Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Boat Question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    New Boat Question

    I just put a deposit on a new VR5 and have a few questions. We mainly got it to take the family out on the local lakes in the Pacific Northwest. I was wondering if would be safe to take it out on the Puget Sound and maybe do a little crabbing and island hopping. I know it has a lot to do with the weather conditions, but I was only thinking of maybe going to an island and staying the night and then going back

    #2
    The Puget Sound can be subject to severe weather changes and rough water!
    For me, that would not be the boat to use in the Puget Sound unless the weather was extremely cooperative.

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      I have done some immensely stupid things on small boats and lived to tell the tale. Locally I have acquaintances that go 50 to 60 miles out in the Gulf to dive on little jetski boats. People do things daily that are not particularly brilliant and everything works out sometimes due to blind luck and other times due to great planning and execution. If you are OK with the risk then take it but take the risk after doing your research and planning, and then execute it well.

      Oh! And if you do something daring and interesting make sure to come back here and tell us all about your adventure so we can live vicariously through your deeds while telling you how crazy/stupid you are and at the same time being jealous!
      Current: 1998 Bayliner 4085 - Cummins 6BTA 370's
      Past: 2004 Monterey 322 - Volvo 5.7 GXi's
      Past: 1987 Silverton 34X - Crusader 454's

      Comment


      • billhein94
        billhein94 commented
        Editing a comment
        I won't be getting the boat until next spring so hopefully you can wait until then.

      #4
      Adding to Ricks comments and my personal experience running an 18 foot open bow on the Puget sound:
      There are days when it’s totally doable, flat water, mild wind, sunshine etc, great fun. Then there are days when it starts out perfect and the weather takes a turn to the point you’re taking an absolute beating trying to get back to port, taking water over the bow etc. One can adjust direction and speed to somewhat compensate for the nasty water conditions but it’s not really something I’d consider safe boating in a small boat. I’ve even taken a beating in my 2556 out there, so always look at the weather/wind forecast to determine how uncomfortable it might be or if it’s even worth going. Have all your safety gear including a decent vhf so if you get into trouble others can be notified to potentially assist.
      Dave
      Edmonds, WA
      "THE FIX"
      '93 2556
      Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
      Misc. projects thread
      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

      Comment


        #5
        I wasn't going to do anything crazy. . .some of the islands are only 10 to 15 miles apart maybe less. I would definitely make sure I was outfitted appropriately. Just wanted to get some inputs

        Comment


          #6
          I came across this review. Doesn't sound too bad.
          Around Seattle I see so many boats of this size, where do people take them?

          https://powerboatmagazine.co.nz/amp/bayliner-vr5/

          There is a youtube channel about Haulover Inlet near Miami, watch that and see what a boat this size can do, or should not do. At this inlet water from the Intercoastal flows out int the Atlantic, generating nasty waves.

          Comment


            #7
            Totally doable much of the time, however, weather is going to be the deciding factor. You might think about a canvas cover for the bow section up to the windshield, there are plenty of YouTube videos showing boaters purposely dunking the bow intending on just a bit of water in the boat….and filling it. Some ship and even medium size boat wakes can put the bow under and having something that slows the flow is a good thing. Where are you on the sound that the islands are ten to fifteen miles apart? There is a danger in overnighting on your boat that you need to be aware of especially if you have an Admiral along. We, wife and our first two kids, started with a year old 19’ Capri and put 200 hours on it in seven months. Then we bought a new 2450 Cierra Sunbridge that worked well until the twins came along. You see where this is going. Our focus was and still is on cruising, but crabbing and fishing are right up there for time the boat is used. Just saying.
            Take classes beyond the minimum and plan to buddy boat to start, especially the first few times you go out.
            P/C Pete
            Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
            1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
            Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
            MMSI 367770440

            Comment


            • Pcpete
              Pcpete commented
              Editing a comment
              Yup, but the porta potty is just the start. Then there’s the privacy thing, next something to cook on, and real bunks, and on from there. I’m being a bit of a joker here but my intent was a cruising focus. Crabbing was a given, but fishing was my Admirals bright idea. My biggest problem with it now that the kids are grown is having someone to go with me.

            • Metrodriver
              Metrodriver commented
              Editing a comment
              My admiral came up with the whole boat idea, thanks to a dog. She went to walk the dog, saw a boat for sale and agreed on it, if I was " on board" with it. Now, 2 years later, it is finally ready for water, except the trailer is not road ready just yet. Ours has a v-berth that can sleep 3, and the upstairs table and seats that can be converted into a bed. A 2 position alcohol stove was standard, we added a small fridge. The portapotty lives in the v-berth, but when anchored I think it will move to a corner on deck. I have been thinking hard about mounting a proper "head" in a corner on the rear deck against the cabin, with a curtain for privacy. I have space for a tank. But toilets are expensive, most are porcelain, and heavy.

            • billhein94
              billhein94 commented
              Editing a comment
              I am talking about launching from Anacortes and visiting some of the San Juan Islands. NOT sleeping on the boat, but just using it for transportation to and from the islands.

            #8
            Originally posted by Metrodriver View Post
            I came across this review. Doesn't sound too bad.
            Around Seattle I see so many boats of this size, where do people take them?

            https://powerboatmagazine.co.nz/amp/bayliner-vr5/
            Lake Washington and lake Samamish for the most part. The Puget sound is doable in this type of boat, just need to watch the weather.
            Dave
            Edmonds, WA
            "THE FIX"
            '93 2556
            Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

            The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
            Misc. projects thread
            https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

            Comment


            • Metrodriver
              Metrodriver commented
              Editing a comment
              I drive quite often by the boat storage place on Lake Union halfway between the I-5 bridge and Fisheries Supply that has several hundreds of small boats stacked up on racks. Always wonder where people go with them.
              Friend of mine in Miami has an open boat, about 20ft, 2 outboards. He has taken it to Bimini (Bahamas), 50 NM of open ocean. Once on the way back they ran into thunderstorms, he said it was scary. Except for a little bimini top over the helm, there was nowhere to hide. Told him he was nuts...

            #9
            Originally posted by Metrodriver View Post

            There is a youtube channel about Haulover Inlet near Miami, watch that and see what a boat this size can do, or should not do. At this inlet water from the Intercoastal flows out int the Atlantic, generating nasty waves.
            Personal experience with Haulover and the surrounding area. Net is finding a boat with anyone sober on it could be a lifetime challenge so take some of what you see in those videos as examples of the impaired doing things the impaired do. On the plus side, the mating displays are extraordinary and well worth the cost of admission.
            Current: 1998 Bayliner 4085 - Cummins 6BTA 370's
            Past: 2004 Monterey 322 - Volvo 5.7 GXi's
            Past: 1987 Silverton 34X - Crusader 454's

            Comment


              #10
              Bill, launching at Anacortes has some interesting choices.. I launched our 24 from Washington Park one time, over thirty five years ago, and the local custom was to very casually rig your boat after arriving at the ramp. I had our system set up so that it took less than ten minutes to be ready to dip the trailer, so, after watching the others get lost in conversations with each other, I went up the line of four bats and asked if I could go ahead of them while they talked. They were shocked that I could be ready after “just pulling in”, but allowed me to go ahead. Point is, different places have their own social customs and you need to be aware of them.
              As to challenges of rough water, Rosario Straight can be pretty snotty, or absolutely flat, or socked in with fog. Once across Rosario most of the channels are protected, but some, like San Juan Channel, have enough fetch to make it uncomfortable. Do not cut any buoys! Follow the Rules of the Road, because there are those who won’t and you have to compensate for them, and stay clear of the ferries. They are on regular routes and I use the “he’s big and I don’t want to ruin my day with a collision at sea” or get a call from the USCG. A reasonably sized gps chart plotter would be a good tool for planning and executing a trip. A VHF radio, fixed or hand held is also a good plan to use. The Marinas all use VHF for assigning moorage, even short stays. The radios also have weather channels. However, it’s not a CB and there are strict procedures, hail on 16 then go to an appropriate working channel.
              Not sure makes a good point about being sobriety challenged. Being on the water is like you’ve already had your first, and maybe a second, so the skipper really needs to hold off until the end of the day before having that adult beverage. Any problems need to be dealt with with a clear head. I’m not trying to be a downer, I just want you to be safe to have a great time.
              P/C Pete
              Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
              1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
              Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
              MMSI 367770440

              Comment


              • billhein94
                billhein94 commented
                Editing a comment
                Pete,
                This is great information. I really just wanted to know if it is even a good idea to even think about it. We had made reservations on a resort on Orcas Island a while back and we were originally going to take the ferry. I just had a wild thought about using the boat to get there instead. It would basically be launch the boat somewhere I am comfortable with and take to West Beach on Orcas. Then I would moor is somewhere while we go to the resort for the weekend. Then take the boat back home. Maybe it is just a lofty thought, but we are super excited about our new boat and just wanted some inputs on its limtations. I realize that the limitations are probably more in the experience of the Captain and the Weather.
                Sounds like it is doable i just need to do my homework.

              #11
              Originally posted by builderdude View Post
              Lake Washington and lake Samamish for the most part. The Puget sound is doable in this type of boat, just need to watch the weather.
              I basically plan to stick to the local lakes and trailer the boat each trip. We live close to Baker Lake and Lake Whatcom. We also plan to take trips East of the mountains to Pearyggin Lake and maybe Chelan.

              Comment

              Working...
              X