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DIY boat maintenance for $730/year... just for starters!-gctid351438

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    DIY boat maintenance for $730/year... just for starters!-gctid351438

    I was just tallying up my estimated maintenance costs, and thought I'd share and see if it's on par with you all. Keep in mind that this is a salt water boat... Even without considering miscellaneous failures and infrequent maintenance (i.e., bellows replacement), I'm coming up with an estimated average $730/year maintenance on my 5.7l alpha 1 (and this is always parts-only as I do all my own work!).

    1) Replace trailer tires after 3 years regardless of condition or mileage (this is due to internal/structural degredation of the rubber)

    Cost: $166/year (at $500 every 3 years)

    2) Replace exhaust mani/risers every 3 years in salt

    Cost: $200/year (at $600 every 3 years - more it you take to a shop)

    3) Replace spark plugs every year

    Cost: $24/year (at $3/plug every year)

    4) Outdrive service (pull drive, inspect, grease, align, fluids, gaskets) every year

    Cost: $50/year

    5) Impeller replacement every other year

    Cost: $25/year (at $50 every other year)

    6) Oil change every year

    Cost: $38/year ($8 for filter, $30 for oil)

    7) Change fuel/water separator every year

    Cost: $8/year

    8) Trailer brakes

    Cost: $71/year (rotors/hubs and calipers repalced every ~7 years at $500)

    9) Anodes

    Cost: $18/year (replace every 4 years at $70)

    10) Wax and Soap

    Cost: $30/year

    11) Batteries

    Cost: $100/year ($400 for 3 batteries every 4 years)

    #2
    On the trailer tires... I'm assuming it is a dual axle. I just replaced tires on a friend's trailer for $300 out the door on all four. These were 205/75 R15 load class D tires; and will last well over three years. Shop around and you'll find them for that price.

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      #3
      Astral Blue wrote:
      On the trailer tires... I'm assuming it is a dual axle. I just replaced tires on a friend's trailer for $300 out the door on all four. These were 205/75 R15 load class D tires; and will last well over three years. Shop around and you'll find them for that price.
      Goodyear Marathons $110 ea = $440 plus tax = $488

      Regardless of brand, I've seen the guideline to replace them every 3 years in many places. It seems too frequent to me, but I figure better safe than sorry. The last time I replaced mine, the tread looked great.

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        #4
        It is what it is.....If you like boating and you've got the money to do it, you spend it whether or not you DIY which I do as well. Frankly, I don't add it up because I don't care. As long as I can afford to enjoy my boat, I will!

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          #5
          leedub wrote:
          Goodyear Marathons $110 ea = $440 plus tax = $488

          Regardless of brand, I've seen the guideline to replace them every 3 years in many places. It seems too frequent to me, but I figure better safe than sorry. The last time I replaced mine, the tread looked great.
          Is that a manufacture's recommendation ? Sounds a lot like a shampoo bottle, lather rinse repeat...

          I would not replace it unless it had some indication of being bad, cracking dryness etc..

          Of course if I was going on a long trip that would be taken into consideration as well.

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            #6
            A friend of mine told me the 3 year rule too. His opinion on the matter, was that since the tires often sit for extended periods of time they tend to get harder than other tires that get used like on our cars. Not going through the normal heat cycles a tire stands to get hard and brittle. He also said that if you went out and put tire dressing on the side walls every few months you could stretch it another year or so.

            Now a little antecdote about tires that looked new to me. Heck they even had the nipples on the side still. Trailered over Snoqualamie pass with my wife and 3 month old daughter with our new 27ft Cobalt. On the way down the pass we had *2* flat tires, on 4th of July weekend. Let me tell you what a fun day that was. I will personally never trailer a boat any distance without seeing the receipt for tires, or putting my own on after that escapade.

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              #7
              I keep mine covered when not in use.

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                #8
                RV tires, also loaded quite heavy, the recommendation is replace every 5 years. Three years is way excessive. IMO

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                  #9
                  Monterey10 wrote:
                  I keep mine covered when not in use.
                  never thought about my tires....but I like your idea....and also the idea to use something to "moisturizer" the tire

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