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Understanding wave heights and reports?

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    #31
    If you need cables, here are the length and quantity call outs for the 1993 model. Installing and adjusting are a pita so get the good ones that can take the tightest bends.
    2-13 foot
    3-16 foot
    1-19 foot
    1-22 foot
    1-24 foot
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    MMSI 367770440

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      #32
      It just keeps going I am taking it all in and trying to be a good student.. anyone down Niceville fl way we are planning to be there about every weekend starting in march..give a shout maybe we could share some docktails

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        #33
        Originally posted by BPJum View Post

        Toy4two - I used to Test Fly over those waters between Marina Del Ray , Long Beach and Catalina. We used to spot some HUGH sharks basking in the sun in that channel. Always had a raft on board . Feared them finding the beacon and just the arm that was holding it.
        Oh I've seen large sharks on my way to Catalina in the channel twice. Huge dorsal fin and their rear tails going side to side moving in figure eight patterns eating schools of fish at the surface. I try not to get too close. One weeks at Two Harbors unbenonst to us this was happenning less than a mile from where we were moored: https://www.latimes.com/california/s...atalina-island

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          #34
          Yes, "Sometimes that shark he looks right into ya. Right into your eyes. And, you know, the thing about a shark... he's got lifeless eyes. Black eyes. Like a doll's eyes" Quint from Jaws.

          But seriously, in those waters I have seen 30 knot windy days and the seas out there were perfect for sailing and boating in a 20 footer. I think it probably has to do with the 27 plus mile stretch. here in puget sound that same wind could make it a real challenge for that same 20 footer due to the narrow 3-5 mile average.

          In so Cal waters your biggest fear is what would make the taxidermy man faint as those teeth show. Your water temps are pretty warm. Here in Puget Sound hypothermia will getcha in about 20 min. Even when we are out in challenging 3-4 footers, the inflatable vests are just a feel good. We both know the real savior if we were to take on too much water is the dingy. Another plus here is the amount of boaters in a given area especially in the summer months. If you were to put out a distress call chances are you would have a boater respond on channel 16 immediately.

          A old Alaska Tug Captain once told me ,
          Your vessel is up to it ! are you?
          I think he was right. The only way to learn what the limits are is by slowly working your way into more challenging conditions until you find those limits. preferably with someone more experienced with you.The 2452 being top heavy is more work than maybe a 3255 laying low. Safe Boating and following seas

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            #35
            Just wanted to Say thank you too all for the education. Promise to take it slow, this is all a little different than my 30 years of boating on lakes in a ski boat. If anyone is down in the Niceville area on the weekends this summer, ok so summer starts in march lol look us up.
            Mike and The Admiral Karen

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              #36
              Buy "Chapmans piloting and seamanship" book. They have it at rip-off west mar, and thru amazon. They have a section on "heavy weather" which will show you how to stay boat bottom down. In the CG auxiliary boat operators manual is defines heavy weather as "the wave heights are more than 2/3 the freeboard of the boat." The Chapmans used to be the manual for C G Aux basic qualification, and for the Power Squadron.
              Here is Florida the media is accused at not telling it like it is, because of many parts of us are dependent on tourist money for fishing and boating. So its watered down a bit. However in their jargon, 2-4 ft seas means the AVERAGE is that, but there may be some as high as 5, and a small minority ay 6'. Be aware and keep a lookout.
              I have been had by the weather reports and been out in some heavy stuff. But I was train in that. Note: When the admiral is hanging over the stern giving a different meaning to the words "heaving line", don't ask for her to bring you a beer.
              Captharv 2001 2452
              "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

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                #37
                My next book for light reading.. I have my coast guard aux inspection next week and going to ask about some on the water training. Yes the Admiral has made it quite clear she does not want to be "heaving any lines" anytime soon.. One day I will get past the pass

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                  #38
                  If the Admiral doesn’t want to handle lines and fenders, then put her at the helm and you do the lines. Another option is to take a guest or two who know how to handle boat lines. We’ve done that on our two week cruise the last couple of years and it worked out great.
                  P/C Pete
                  Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                  1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                  Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                  MMSI 367770440

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                  • Centerline2
                    Centerline2 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yes.... I actually prefer to handle the lines, as I know exactly what I want, but my wife cant handle the boat as well as I can, and she is well aware of it, so we just make do with her playing "deck hand"... (which is why I felt the need to install the anchor windlass)
                    .....you gotta do what you can to take care of the deck hand when shes the one keeping you warm at night....
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