Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

angry seas-gctid407170

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    angry seas-gctid407170

    http://youtu.be/XaQFsRcxcFk went on a simple 30 mile overnight trip to a nearby marina with my brother and brotherinlaw .the marine forecast was good , but lo and behold while we peacefully slept the weatherman changed it. i love the hardtop!!!!!

    #2
    jamie mac wrote:
    http://youtu.be/XaQFsRcxcFk went on a simple 30 mile overnight trip to a nearby marina with my brother and brotherinlaw .the marine forecast was good , but lo and behold while we peacefully slept the weatherman changed it. i love the hardtop!!!!!
    omg I had to stop or I would hurl... we had that happen a month ago.. clear skies, awesome crabbing and halibut in our little nitch cover, woke up fixed breakfast on the stove.. within an hour turned cloudy and winds kicked up. Bytime we raised anchor and spun around the swells were nasty like yours.. never under estimate mother nature and her ever changing ways... glad your back at dock and safe...

    Comment


      #3
      RinnyBeth wrote:
      omg I had to stop or I would hurl... we had that happen a month ago.. clear skies, awesome crabbing and halibut in our little nitch cover, woke up fixed breakfast on the stove.. within an hour turned cloudy and winds kicked up. Bytime we raised anchor and spun around the swells were nasty like yours.. never under estimate mother nature and her ever changing ways... glad your back at dock and safe...
      Me too

      Comment


        #4
        Looks like a typical late afternoon island crossing here, always a slop feast.
        " WET EVER "
        1989 2459 TROPHY OFFSHORE 5.8L COBRA / SX
        mmsi 338108404
        mmsi 338124956
        "I started with nothing and still have most of it left"

        Comment


          #5
          The best way to handle those conditions is to do what you did, buddy boats and moderated speed. Good seamanship.

          If conditions are really uncomfortable, another trick is to borrow a page from our sailboater friends and tack. It will take longer to get to your destination, but can somewhat diminish pounding as opposed to taking heavy seas head on.

          Safe and Happy Boating!

          ColonyCove

          Comment


            #6
            So what did you drink when you finally got to the marina? Besides ALOT??

            Joey
            2007 Discovery 246
            5.0L MPI BRAVO III
            The "BAY-BEA"

            Comment


              #7
              Hey that's still fishable...c'mon over to Lake Erie on an angry day when the forecast goes south: Short sets of five footers capping with mixed seas to boot.

              Comment


                #8
                Reel Power wrote:
                Hey that's still fishable...c'mon over to Lake Erie on an angry day when the forecast goes south: Short sets of five footers capping with mixed seas to boot.
                You've got that right.
                Rick Grew

                2019 Yamaha EX Jetski

                2004 Past Commodore
                West River Yacht & Cruising Club

                Comment


                  #9
                  ColonyCove wrote:
                  The best way to handle those conditions is to do what you did, buddy boats and moderated speed. Good seamanship.

                  If conditions are really uncomfortable, another trick is to borrow a page from our sailboater friends and tack. It will take longer to get to your destination, but can somewhat diminish pounding as opposed to taking heavy seas head on.

                  Safe and Happy Boating!

                  ColonyCove
                  Hi, I am guessing that by 'buddy boats' you mean running right behind each other, correct? Putting the biggest boat out there in front to flatten the water?

                  Am I on this, or way off base?


                  Comment


                    #10
                    LazyCrusr wrote:
                    Hi, I am guessing that by 'buddy boats' you mean running right behind each other, correct? Putting the biggest boat out there in front to flatten the water?

                    Am I on this, or way off base?

                    +1

                    Comment


                      #11
                      LazyCrusr wrote:
                      Hi, I am guessing that by 'buddy boats' you mean running right behind each other, correct? Putting the biggest boat out there in front to flatten the water?

                      Am I on this, or way off base?

                      Placing larger boats up front will do essentially nothing to flatten the water unless perhaps your buddy is a supertanker. The real benefit to be derived here is that another boat is very close by if your boat suddenly gets into trouble, and can possibly tow or rescue if conditions permit, and should at least be able to serve as a communications command center to guide rescue resources to the vessel in trouble. Sailing all alone is a thrill, but somewhat more of a risk if poor weather is encountered.

                      Safe and Happy Boating!

                      ColonyCove

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The boat in the middle wasnt used to this type of weather so to instill confidence in him we travelled in this formation. it wasnt a real bad day but it had the potential to get worse because the wind was against the tide. as the tide slackened off the choppy water conditions sudsided and we were able to pick up the pace. we were all family in the convoy so it was a nice safe way to travel.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          ColonyCove wrote:
                          Placing larger boats up front will do essentially nothing to flatten the water unless perhaps your buddy is a supertanker. The real benefit to be derived here is that another boat is very close by if your boat suddenly gets into trouble, and can possibly tow or rescue if conditions permit, and should at least be able to serve as a communications command center to guide rescue resources to the vessel in trouble. Sailing all alone is a thrill, but somewhat more of a risk if poor weather is encountered.

                          Safe and Happy Boating!

                          ColonyCove
                          I don't agree with that. Any size boat will smooth the water out in front of you. I use that tactic a lot and the closer you follow the easier it is. Try it sometime. I often have boats following me as well.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            trophyboat wrote:
                            I don't agree with that. Any size boat will smooth the water out in front of you. I use that tactic a lot and the closer you follow the easier it is. Try it sometime. I often have boats following me as well.
                            I have also used this method many times and find it works well

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I have found it doesn't flatten the seas but it can knock down the chop at the top.
                              Boatless at this time

                              A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X