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2855 v. 2859-gctid406566

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    2855 v. 2859-gctid406566

    I know they're really 2 different kinds of boats, but I'm looking at one of each in the next 2 days and wanted to see if I could get any real input from people who actually own each boat, or have even owned both. They both have carb'd 454s but the 1996 2855 has a B3 and the 1995 2859 has a B2. The 2859 does have a couple extras like radar and GPS, but they're both about the same price range.

    I don't personally know of any hull differences or if there really are any, and how they would each handle rougher weather. its just a big difference in appearance and really functionality of the boats since the 2859 doesnt have an open deck. I'm sure I'll be looking for a little input on some other possible purchases, so I'd like to thank you all in advance.

    Mike

    #2
    I'm all in on the 2855. Mine is a 7.4L BIII set up and it is everything we need in a boat. We are a boating couple with a slip on Lake Michigan and do all of our boating on the "pond". I'll start with what we see as the only downsides to the 2855. The admiral would like a bigger fridge and we both would like a little more deck space for the few times we entertain. 6 adults is about max for entertaining at the dock. Ideally there would be room for two deck chairs on the back deck - but that's a push on a boat designed to maximize cabin space on a 28' boat. Sometimes I'd like a bigger swim platform too.

    The upsides are many. Our boat is our weekend retreat and/or "lake cottage" only ours floats and we can go where we want. The cabin area is perfect for the two of us with a very comfortable queen size aft berth, a dinette and sufficient storage for week long trips around the lake. We have A/C/Heat - a must have in our opinion for Lake Michigan boating where it can be in the 40s in April/May and the 90's in the summer months. The 7.4L BIII is a perfect set up for this boat as we can max out at close to 40MPH(with huge sucking sounds) and cruise all day at 3200-3400RPM and 25MPH with an efficiency equating to about 1.8MPG. The BIII handles like a dream and I'm not bragging when I say I can virtually parallel park this boat when needed. What's really nice about this boat is we can go to the marina and be under way in minutes and not have to be thinking about how much gas we'll burn to just go out and putz around. Many of my dockmates have larger boats, but most have become dock queens making maybe one or two trips a year. We are often out every weekend - maybe only for a few hours, but the size and set up make those trips easy and economical. And yet we are very content to just go to the boat and hang out or spend a night on the boat since we have all the conveniences of home.

    As far as handling, I have found the 2855 can take whatever Michigan throws at you short of full on gales. 3-4 footers are well within it's ability and on one trip we found ourselves in 9+ footers - the waves were higher than the windshield. We managed though I wouldn't recommend it. We got hit with fog, thunderstorms and building seas within a span of 2 hours and we were between ports so had no choice. Michigan can turn "sporty" in a hurry and it's nice to know the 2855 will take it if it has too. So all in all this has been a great boat for us. Perhaps when we "retire???" we'll go for the bigger one, but we have never regretted the purchase of this boat.

    I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have about the 2855!

    Comment


      #3
      These are really 2 different styles of boat - a sunbridge or a foul weather fishing platform.

      If you want open air, lots of sunshine, lots of padded seating - then you want the sunbridge.

      If you want protection from the elements, a bit more comfy/roomy cabin - then go for the 59.

      Comment


        #4
        Sunbridges have very flat bottoms compared to the 2859 as well. They'll beat ya to death in rolling chop. The 2859 is a great platform for staying dry, cruising in damp weather and fishing as Mike said.
        Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

        iBoatNW

        1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

        Comment


          #5
          A nice compromise! Sunbridge feeling on the flybridge. Cabin feeling down below. Comfy boat, wide beam.
          Tally and Vicki
          "Wickus" Meridian 341
          MMSI 338014939

          Comment


            #6
            SomeSailor wrote:
            Sunbridges have very flat bottoms compared to the 2859 as well. They'll beat ya to death in rolling chop. The 2859 is a great platform for staying dry, cruising in damp weather and fishing as Mike said.
            The 96 2855 has a 21* deadrise hull and is very good in rough water. Having owned a 2655 I can speak to that. I have no idea how the 2859 handles so I go with what you say here. I was in rough waters several times up to and including 16' waves on Lake Erie and the 2855 handled them very well. I would own another 2855 of that vintage in a heartbeat.
            Rick Grew

            2019 Yamaha EX Jetski

            2004 Past Commodore
            West River Yacht & Cruising Club

            Comment


              #7
              talman wrote:
              A nice compromise! Sunbridge feeling on the flybridge. Cabin feeling down below. Comfy boat, wide beam.
              My first Bayliner was a 289/2859. Our summers here are ridiculously hot (119 yesterday) so we tired quickly of the 3-sided glass under the hard top. In retrospect, we could have installed an RV air cond. on the hard top, and probably would still own that one, which had a 350 mag (300 hp) and B3. What I liked most about that boat was the spacious aft cockpit for our two deckchairs, which we prefer to upholstered seating.

              But we traded that in on a 305/3055, the next step up from the 2855. We liked that boat's cabin and roomy aft seating, but no room for deck chairs. I also liked the power of the twins, except at fuel stops and annual maintenance. It was more difficult to tow with an 11' beam and 15,000 lbs.+ on the trailer, a little over my old truck's capacity. The 2855 I believe is 9'10", just one inch wider than the 2859, no big deal there. What I didn't like about the 305/3055 was hassling with isinglass and screens, same as you would have on a 2855. We had the camper back on the 2859 and no Alaskan bulkhead. The camper top stayed up all year, the back rolled up, and the sides too.

              So we put the 305 up for sale, and before it sold, a friend and former dock neighbor informed me he was selling his 2858. When we bought the 289, the 288(2858) was our other consideration. I guess we had to go through a hard top and a sunbridge to realize that we really like the flybridge the best. As Tally said above, a great compromise. I have a bimini top on the bridge, no isinglass. If it's too hot or cold, or raining, we go below. I have a bridge cover that goes on pretty quickly, but all I really need is a dash cover to protect electronics, coming soon. The beam is 10 feet even and it's L.O.A. is listed at 30'6". The huge swim platform, best of the three, stretches the length to almost 33 feet. On the trailer, it's about 13,000 lbs., and my old truck handled it easily, my new one even better. We've owned it about 1.5 years now, and have no immediate plans to change. Go check one out, might save you a boat purchase or two...

              Edit: The things CaptJMH said about handling would also apply to the 2859 or 2858. We just got back from 2 weeks aboard on the Pacific, where we got in some nasties. As with most boats, they'll take more rough waters than the captain and first mate will! Also, the 2858 has a larger fridge like the 305, bigger than the 2859 or 2855. And room for an icemaker too! Another thing we liked better in the 289, and now the 2858, is the large cabin windows. The 305 was OK, though...
              Jeff & Tara (And Ginger too)
              Lake Havasu City, AZ
              |
              Current: 2008 Playcraft 2400 MCM 350 Mag B3
              2000 Bayliner 3388 Cummins 4bta 250s (SOLD 2020)
              2000 Bayliner 2858 MCM 7.4 MPI B3 (SOLD 2018)
              2007 Bayliner 305 MCM twin 350 Mag B3s (SOLD 2012)
              2008 Bayliner 289 MCM 350 Mag Sea Core B3 (SOLD 2009)
              And 12 others...
              In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. 7-2-10

              Comment


                #8
                I'd agree with the 2858 being a worthy consideration. They have a similar hull to the 2859 and are actually a little wider. I don't care for driving from down below and forward like that configuration gives you, but the flybridge is awesome if you have the weather for it.

                As far as deadrise goes, cutting through chop is as much a factor of the bow angle and hull steepness in the front section. Run a Trophy alongside a Bay with the same deadrise angles and you'll soon see them walk off and leave you in the choppy stuff.

                If you haven't given the 2858's a good look, I'd add them to your searches.
                Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                iBoatNW

                1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks for all the replies. I do really like the open deck layout of the 2855, as well as the styling. I did see some 2858s while I was looking around, but couldn't really find anything within 100 miles or so to look at. Still it is an option, as I really do like the flybridge, not really sure I could get used to driving a boat from inside and be as happy.

                  I'll give some feedback on what I see in the boats as I look at them.

                  thanks again, Mike.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Well, I just got back from looking at a 1996 Bayliner 2855 at a broker. It looked as if it came with a trailer, but they said something about the owner had no title blah blah blah. So they were asking $22500 for it, and it was a bare bones model with almost nothing. The boat was in pretty good condition, I'd give it a little less than a 9/10 and it wasn't really cleaned up like it should have been. I don't think I'd go over 15 for it based on the options. does that seem somewhat reasonable?

                    One question about this model-Is it fairly typical for the dash to have a bunch of small cracks all over it? This is the 2nd one I've seen, and both had this to different degrees.

                    I'm also a little skeptical about bottom paint, just because I can;t tell anything really about the condition of the bottom. The paint was decent, but definitely needed touched up at least. But on that note, how smooth should bottom paint be? just so I know when looking.

                    Thanks, Mike

                    Comment


                      #11
                      no title ? and a broker is trying to sell it ?

                      How does the broker figure you can get title to it so you can register it ?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I don't speak blah blah. But it probably means the owner still has a bank loan on it which means the bank is the lien holder. So, the bank is actually holding the title until they get their money.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          trophyboat wrote:
                          I don't speak blah blah. But it probably means the owner still has a bank loan on it which means the bank is the lien holder. So, the bank is actually holding the title until they get their money.
                          No broker would use the term "no title" in that situation - that is just normal closing stuff. No title is code for "the seller cannot give you title to it".

                          Either the broker provides a clear path to get title or, as was said in the movies, "Run Forest! Run!"

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Oh i'm sorry for the confusion, it is the trailer that they said did not have a title. The previous owner used the trailer, but didn't have it titled or something along those lines. And in PA it is required to have a title, unlike OH where it just gets registered with its weight. So, in short, the boat did not end up having a trailer with it as the owner said in the craigslist ad i found it through.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Ah. Trailers exist in a very fuzzy place. It really depends on what the state requires. I had a trailer in CT that (at the time ) did not need a title, and a simple bill of sale transferred ownership.

                              Comment

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