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    Rookie trailer question

    Hey all,

    I picked up a 96 trophy 2002 WA with its original single axle Escort trailer. It has the typical carpet covered wooden bunks and the guide rollers up the center of the frame. My question is, are the guide rollers supposed to make contact with the keel when it's supported on the bunks when out of the water? I know with my other boat, it always sits on those guides, but the keel is covered in black marks from the rubber, I've never actually questioned this or set up a trailer myself. If I was close to water I probably wouldn't be too concerned, but real fishing is over the mountains and through the woods to Vancouver Island literally almost 1000 miles from where I live.

    Thanks for the help

    #2
    From my perspective, yes, the keel should be supported by the rollers. I’ve never had or setup a bunk trailer, but have had a trailer with roller trays that preceded bunks. It seems that the roller trays were mounted so they supported the boat under the outboard stringers. The trick will be balancing the load equally between the bunks and keel. Also, the back roller went under the transom to prevent a hook from developing in the hull. It was a carryover from wooden boats but careful support is important. There are non marking rollers, and that your previous boat was marked suggests that the rollers were, well, not rolling.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
    MMSI 367770440
    1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
    Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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      #3
      Yes. The weight of the boat should be distributed between the bunks and the rollers.

      Comment


        #4
        No personal experience with "keel rollers" on a trailer but this boat is on a single axle trailer so probably not to heavy.
        Personally Id want most of the boats weight on the carpeted bunks and the winch post roller/bow stop and very little on the keel rollers. I'd be afraid of overly stressing the keel at the point where the rollers make contact especially while bouncing down the highway. The rollers may have been added to help protect the keel from making contact with the trailers cross members while retrieving.
        Just my thoughts....
        Dave
        Edmonds, WA
        "THE FIX"
        '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
        (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
        The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
        Misc. projects thread
        https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

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          #5
          here is a pic of my very old 1997 escort trailer...is yours kinda like this?

          those 3 rollers in the center were only to keep the boat from hitting the trailer frame while loading the boat...the boat did NOT rest on these

          the boat would rest on the very front wheel type rollers

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Capture.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	280.3 KB
ID:	415187
          1997 Bayliner Trophy 2352
          5.7 Mercruiser/Alpha I Gen II /Full Closed Cooling
          San Diego, CA

          HookEmDanO out ......

          the more people I meet the more I love my dogs !

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            #6
            I agree...the bunks carry the weight evenly. The rollers at cross members are to protect keel during launch and load due to angle of boat while at the launch.

            If those are not rolling or rotted then replace to prevent gauging....cant imagine they would have flat spot as they only contact boat briefly. You can get the clear neoprene ones to prevent marking up keel.
            Current: 2008 H210SS Four Winns
            Prior: 1997 2050SS Bayliner

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              #7
              Thanks for all the input. I've been doing some reading elsewhere and I have to agree with the last few comments. I'd rather not have weight concentrated on such small points of contact especially considering the traveling I'm doing and the age of the boat. Once I get the wife hooked then I might have to start looking for something bigger and newer........you know.........for the family.

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                #8
                In an ideal world you'll get the bunks set exactly at the right height so that just before the bow contacts the front roller all the weight goes onto the bunks and the last few inches of forward travel leave no weight on the keel rollers. That shouldn't be a problem - we all live in the ideal world - right? In practice what you need to do is load the boat, snug it up at the bow and then adjust the keel rollers so they just barely clear the keel.
                R.J.(Bob) Evans
                Buchanan, SK
                Cierra 2755
                Previously 43 Defever, Response LX
                Various runabouts, canoes & kayaks

                Comment


                  #9
                  Of all the keel rollers I have seen they are not setup to actually carry weight.

                  The rod through the middle is a sloppy fit and too small for the span if you were to rest a portion of the boat weight on them, the brackets and slotting will not hold up weight over time with the load trailer bouncing from road inputs.
                  1989 3888
                  Nobody gets out alive.

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                    #10
                    Thanks for all the input. My trailer is very similar to the one that hookemdano with the exception of the bow rollers, mine's is a smaller unit. I do know one thing right now after almost 6 months of winter, I'm aching to get working on this boat and get it on some liquid water.

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