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Which knot is the right knot?

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    Which knot is the right knot?

    Hey Folks,

    I have a question on knots. I will have use of a boat house in the near future. It has dock rings instead of cleats.

    My thought is to keep the line fastened to the ring and when tying off bring the line to the boat and tie off at the deck cleat. I'll mount hooks high enough up the walls that the line when unfastened from the boat can be hung on the hook for easy retrieval when returning to the boat house. I'm just imaging it becoming a pain in the backside to thread the line through the rings when coming and going.

    So my question is, what is the best knot to use to secure the line to the ring? One that will not slip or work it's way loose.

    Thanks in advance for your advice.

    Paul
    US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

    1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
    MMSI: 338181912

    #2
    you will have to pass the rope thru the ring regardless of weather you tie directly to the ring, or bring the line back to the boat and use a cleat.... cleating back on the boat is my preferred method, as the line can be cast off and pulled aboard while standing on the boat, rather having to be on the dock to untie it, throw the line aboard, and then board the boat and put the line away....

    when tying directly to a ring, a double half hitch works well..... i prefer to go thru the ring and tie a slip knot around the line, and then use the loop of the slip knot to half hitch the line for a safety.....

    a mooring hitch can be used but its a bit harder to tie, and has very little more advantage. when leaving the boat unattended, the hitch needs the slip loop to be half hitched around the line for safety..... because these hitches are strong, but simply tied, if the "safety" half hitch is not put in it, the tail could work out of the knot and allow the boat to drift free.


    NU LIBERTE'
    Salem, OR

    1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
    5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
    N2K equipped throughout..
    2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
    2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
    '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
    Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

    Comment


    • O1dSoldier
      O1dSoldier commented
      Editing a comment
      The mooring hitch came to mind right away but as you mentioned it's not really a permanent/secure knot without the extra steps. I'd prefer a knot that is secure "out of the box" rather than have to rely on remembering the extra steps.

      I agree that having the ability to untie from the deck and pull the lines aboard and go is nice but when coming in that method has me getting off the boat, running the line through the loop, getting back on the boat and tying it off. That's a lot running around when single handing it which is why I want to permanently fix the lines to the rings, hang them in the wall when away and be able to just reach over and grab them and tie off on the deck cleat when returning.

      I wonder if there is some contraption that fits on the end of a boat hook that will allow me to pass the line through the ring from the deck of the boat. I've seem things similar for attaching to mooring balls but I've only seen ones that put a hook on the ring versus pass the rope through and bring it back.

    #3
    there are boat hook devices that will pass a rope thru a ring, and you can draw it back to yourself... but its necessary that the ring stand up/out so that it has unobstructed access.... there are a few different ones all working on the same principal. type in mooring ball happy hooker.


    NU LIBERTE'
    Salem, OR

    1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
    5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
    N2K equipped throughout..
    2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
    2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
    '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
    Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

    Comment


      #4
      Maybe just get some cleats and bolt em down
      Dave
      Edmonds, WA
      "THE FIX"
      '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
      (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
      Misc. projects thread
      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

      Comment


        #5
        I would tie a clove hitch with a half hitch safety on the lead (the line leading back to the boat). Inside a boat house you are not going to get any real stress or tension on the ring so little chance of the clove hitch binding up making future un tying difficult. If tying to a ring on a dock that is exposed to strong winds, I have done a double wrap around the ring (this halves the strain on the line at the ring and reduces chance of chafe) with a pair of half hitch safeties on the lead to prevent the line from unravelling from the ring, but still easy to untie as the half hitches won't bind on the lead line. If you are really unsure that the line will unravel you can simply add more half hitches.

        Comment


          #6
          There is this:
          https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8L6_cWLNBU
          Last I checked, they were a little over 100 bucks at the marina store.
          What I have seen many people do is just have a dedicated set of mooring lines permanently attached at their home slip. So no need to detach the dockside end ever. Just unloop from your boat clear and sail away. Pull in and drop loops on your boat.
          Esteban
          B-ham!
          Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

          Comment


            #7
            what green650 said. its your home port dock, easy to have dedicated lines that you pick up with a boat hook upon arrival.
            Novurania 335DL. 30HP. WKRP in cincinnati. Previously: Bayliner 3818 in PNW.

            Comment


              #8
              Thanks for all the feedback folks. We moved the boat down this past Sunday and now that we're actually in the boathouse it's a pretty snug fit with only a few inches of space to each side of the boat so there is very little movement. With that in mind just running the line from the boat through the loop and back to the boat again isn't such a big deal.

              Paul
              US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

              1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
              MMSI: 338181912

              Comment

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