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Starting to get 2 footitus!-gctid401460

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    Starting to get 2 footitus!-gctid401460

    Hey there all, long time since I have been on the forum but been having fun with my 1988 19' cuddy with 125 force outboard(bought 4 years ago).

    We did a trip up the Trent Severn for the first time this summer and now the Admiral is on board with the idea of something a bit bigger when money permits...lol. I have started looking something in the 2255 or 2355 category. Can anyone tell me the fuel consumption difference between a 4.3, 5.0 and the 5.7? We usually have 3-4 people on-board and we like to travel in the 25 mph range(we are not speed demons). I am trying to see dollar wise how much more it would cost to operate. I have a 100L fuel tank and am factoring in the 2 stroke oil. I was looking at the mid cabin layout because we do like to do a fair bit of fishing and I like the idea of the more open back on those models.

    Thanks!

    #2
    Sounds as though you have 4-foot-titus, not 2-foot-titus! Actually, that is a better disease to have, IMO, when coming from a 19 footer.

    Years ago we did the 2 foot steps also, and in looking back, wish that we had made the large step all in one jump.

    That may be something to consider!

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      I have developing a small rash on my arrs near my wallet, I went to the doctor last week and was informed it looks like 6 footitus.

      I was giving a shot and so far it appears to be working, haven't been searching the web for bigger boat in the last few days.

      IT NEVER ENDS !
      " WET EVER "
      1989 2459 TROPHY OFFSHORE 5.8L COBRA / SX
      mmsi 338108404
      mmsi 338124956
      "I started with nothing and still have most of it left"

      Comment


        #4
        We are so very happy with our 2452. it's a 1998 and well outfitted. 3rd owner, PO's took pretty good care of it. bought for $16k with trailer, ac, pressure water, hot water, cockpit shower, marine head. My wife and our two girls have the privacy they need, I've got a boat that plows through wakes better than the 20' cuddy we almost bought and I love having a hard top over my head at all times!

        The fishermen on our lake all have told us to let them know when we plan to sell, they think the 2452 would make a perfect fishing boat!

        Still, we have started thinking about our longer term plans. The wife is talking about live aboard and cruising after the girls leave home in about 5 years and an early retirement/hiatus. If so, I'm a very lucky man! We will go from 23.5ft to 45ft! That's 21.5ft-itis!

        Good luck!

        Comment


          #5
          There are a lot of nice 87-89 2455's out there for a great price. A nice set up with the 5.7, fast and decent on fuel and a good over nighter.

          Comment


            #6
            dktool wrote:
            I have developing a small rash on my arrs near my wallet, I went to the doctor last week and was informed it looks like 6 footitus.

            I was giving a shot and so far it appears to be working, haven't been searching the web for bigger boat in the last few days.

            IT NEVER ENDS !
            Dean, you could have saved your doctor visit Co-Pay by leaving your money, credit cards, bank card, and check book at home with your wife!

            These ladies are very good at things like this!

            BTW, I've had that same rash before!

            .
            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

            Comment


              #7
              2850Bounty wrote:
              Sounds as though you have 4-foot-titus, not 2-foot-titus! Actually, that is a better disease to have, IMO, when coming from a 19 footer.

              Years ago we did the 2 foot steps also, and in looking back, wish that we had made the large step all in one jump.

              That may be something to consider!

              .
              +1 here. Several years ago, (about 4 now), my wife and started discussing getting a larger boat. We had purchased a 16' open bow w/90 Force in 1995 and had it continously that whole time. Loved that boat, but as the kids aged, our needs clearly did as well. After spending close to two years researching, much of that research on this site, we purchased our 265. I know that is a big leap, but to your original point (fuel), I'm willing to bet that what you will spend on fuel between your current 20 ' w/125 Force and a much larger boat with MPI and B3 set up would not be as significant as you may be thinking. Your old 125 Force two stroke will be a pig on fuel compared to a similar FI four. Have fun looking and welcome back.
              Mike & Dixi
              2006 265 5.0 MPI B3
              Closed Cooling

              Comment


                #8
                The Bayliner 24 foot cruisers offer a lot of value and a lot of space. This is where you should be looking.

                Can anyone tell me the fuel consumption difference between a 4.3, 5.0 and the 5.7? We usually have 3-4 people on-board and we like to travel in the 25 mph range(we are not speed demons).
                Fuel economy is really a function of weight, hull design, and speed. Faster is NOT always less efficient, nor are bigger motors. Your choice of 25 MPH will actually burn more fuel in almost any planing boat in the 18-30 foot range. You can actually also end up burning more fuel with a motor that is too small for the hull/weight. The 24 foot cruisers do best with a motor in the 250-300 HP range, which means either a carb 5.7 or an MPI 5.0.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Peachy, when you jump up from a day boat to a cruiser, you also jump up dramatically in accomodations and luxuries. Many people find themselves slowing down a bit, traveling slower and staying longer at the places they really enjoy. So overall, your increase gas costs will not be significant. Your budget will be hit harder by the higher maintenance and upgrade costs, and slip/storage costs and a dramatically higher booze bill.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I recommend the 2452.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      whiskywizard wrote:
                      Peachy, when you jump up from a day boat to a cruiser, you also jump up dramatically in accomodations and luxuries. Many people find themselves slowing down a bit, traveling slower and staying longer at the places they really enjoy. So overall, your increase gas costs will not be significant. Your budget will be hit harder by the higher maintenance and upgrade costs, and slip/storage costs and a dramatically higher booze bill.
                      I am trying to factor in slip fees can only guess at maintanence costs. Storage isn't a problem at this time. I have told the Admiral that although we might burn more fuel doing certain things we would be able to stop and smell the roses instead of having to scramble back to port every day. I do believe you are right about the booze bill though... the Admiral has already pointed out the fact that the larger boat means legal consumption while on the hook... and are you still dabbling in the single malts?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        SwampNut wrote:
                        Faster is NOT always less efficient, nor are bigger motors.
                        Just to add to the mix here.... there will be only two efficient speeds for larger hulls. "Hull speed", whereby you're just putt-putting along..... and then "Planing Speed".

                        But there's a bit more to planing speeds, IMO.

                        Most of us who plane our boats, will see an increase in performance once up on step, and then just a bit more.

                        I call this; "on step, and then some!"

                        People that try to stay just under this hull attitude, are actually burning more fuel per mile than what they realize.

                        whiskywizard wrote:
                        Peachy, when you jump up from a day boat to a cruiser, you also jump up dramatically in accomodations and luxuries. Many people find themselves slowing down a bit, traveling slower and staying longer at the places they really enjoy. So overall, your increase gas costs will not be significant. Your budget will be hit harder by the higher maintenance and upgrade costs, and slip/storage costs and a dramatically higher booze bill.
                        Agreed!

                        There is a cost to anything like this that we enjoy..... snow skiing, rafting, car/truck camping, motor-home travel, air travel vacationing, and the list goes on and on.

                        My philosophy is..... and if you even want to bother doing it:

                        Add up your yearly costs for owning/operating.

                        Divide that by the number of hours/days that you have enjoyed the adventure.

                        There's your cost per hour/day for the luxury of ownership and enjoyment.

                        You can do this for snow skiing, rafting, car/truck camping, motor-home travel, bla bla bla, and so on.

                        Should you decide to quit, you've got a boat with a value that can be sold.
                        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I had a 20' OB ski boat but decided a cabin cruiser would be more my families style. I spent last winter looking at boats and ended up with our 2355. I love the boat...too much, we love to spend the weekend on it and now realize it's just a little too small. In the next few years I'm looking to go to a 2855 or better.

                          Our fuel is'nt bad we usually cruise to a cove and hang out, when we do pull the kids on the tubes is when we start to see the fuel gauge go down. We have the 5.2L merc.

                          The 2355 is about the biggest i'd want to pull with my truck which we only do when we are pulling it to clean her up and repairs.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            A general, ballpark figure for annual maintenance costs for budgeting purposes is 10% of the purchase price of the boat. That doesn't include fuel, berthing fees, insurance or stuff like that. Your mileage may vary depending on the condition of the boat.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I would agree with others, take the 6' jump if you can.

                              Many will comment on the 2452 and similar. Try to find some and get on them. Cockpits are roomy, but the comforts of cockpit seating is also nice in the 2355 and up.

                              Comment

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