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NIGHTMARE AT SEA!!! (everything goes wrong)

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    NIGHTMARE AT SEA!!! (everything goes wrong)

    Never drop your anchor across someone else's anchor....or this can happen.

    Riley and Elayna had a rough day!
    Greg
    1999 Bayliner 3988
    Twin Cummins 6BTA 270hp
    Malaspina Strait, BC

    #2
    That is a very scary situation. What is the best solution???

    What would you have done?

    For me, that’s easy...

    Cut the anchor chain.

    If I’m in the boat who’s prop is fouled, drift free and deploy the spare anchor.

    In our waters of Alasksa we do not have the opportunity to dive so all we can do is cut things free.

    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    www.transferswitch4less.com

    Whats the weather like on our boat
    https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


    Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

    Comment


      #3
      Yep cut the anchor. I carry bolt cutters on the boat for that very reason and a spare anchor and rode
      1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
      twin 454's
      MV Mar-Y-Sol
      1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
      Twin chevy 350's inboard
      Ben- Jamin
      spokane Washington

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by ksanders View Post

        In our waters of Alasksa we do not have the opportunity to dive so all we can do is cut things free.
        Yup, up here you need more than a thong bikini to dive in the water. But I appreciate her effort.

        And I agree, the simplest solution is to ditch your rig and start over. Same thing you do skydiving, same thing you do rock climbing, same thing you do when your primary weapon fails.

        Esteban
        Huntington Beach, California
        2018 Element 16
        Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida
        Former Bayliners: 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

        Comment


          #5
          I bet many words from the unabridged dictionary were used.
          1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
          twin 454's
          MV Mar-Y-Sol
          1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
          Twin chevy 350's inboard
          Ben- Jamin
          spokane Washington

          Comment


            #6
            always carry your spare...
            Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
            Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
            93 3058 sold
            92 2855 (day boat)
            91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
            Longbranch WA
            Life is Good

            Comment


              #7
              We carry a spare 70 lb anchor plus 600’ of anchor rode as well

              KEVIN SANDERS
              4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
              www.transferswitch4less.com

              Whats the weather like on our boat
              https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


              Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Ruffryder View Post
                always carry your spare...
                Yup.
                Two is one and one is none.
                Applies to everything. Well except maybe wives, might get in trouble for that.
                Esteban
                Huntington Beach, California
                2018 Element 16
                Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida
                Former Bayliners: 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by yachtman View Post
                  Yep cut the anchor. I carry bolt cutters on the boat for that very reason and a spare anchor and rode
                  Well, cut the chain appears right but may be not so fast! I encountered a similar situation when my own chain got loose and wrapped around my prop while cruising at 24mph!. In my case the chain+anchor just went over the duo props once and hung down into the depths while the other end of the chain was still attached to the windlass. This meant that I could feed more chain from the windlass and the chain would slide over the shaft to continue its travel and keep going downwards into the sea. IF this is the case, there is a solution that does not require cutting the chain. Here is how it would work;

                  1) First tie a rope to the chain at/near the bow and the windlass. Then tie the rope securely to a cleat that can carry the combined weight of the chain and anchor.
                  2) Unwind the windlass to let all of the chain out (preferably onto your deck). This is the key; as you release more chain the weight of the existing chain dangling from the shaft should cause the chain to slide over the shaft and keep going down the other side. Otherwise, this method won't work. If necessary and possible you can dive down and help pull the chain over the shaft.
                  3) When the end of the chain is reached, tie another rope to the end of the chain. After releasing sufficient chain/rope so that only the rope is on the shaft (i.e. all chain has slid off), tie the other end of the second rope to another cleat.
                  4) Now the chain is hanging off of 2 ropes, one (first rope) tied at the beginning and second that is tied to the end of the chain. At this point cut the rope around the shaft/propeller. that will free your prop/shaft from the chain.
                  5) Use the first rope that is still attached to the chain and the boat to pull the chain back onto the boat. The combined weight of chain and anchor will be too much to pull by hand; Try to wrap the chain around the gypsy of the windlass so the windlass can do the work for you.

                  I was able to do something like this and saved my 250 ft x 8mm chrome-plated chain + Ultra anchor (roughly $3500 total).

                  Happy cruising to all
                  Retired, computer expert / executive
                  Bayliner 285 Cruiser / Mercruiser QSD 4.2L 320 HP Diesel
                  Live in the Bay Area, CA, USA, boat in Turkey
                  D-Marin @ Turgutreis in Bodrum/Turkey
                  [email protected]
                  [email protected]

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I always tie my chain off to a cat heat aft of the windlass, , if no cat head or cleat you need to fins a way to secure your anchor line/chain, a short tie line works well.
                    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                    Twin 350 GM power
                    Located in Seward, AK
                    Retired marine surveyor

                    Comment


                      #11
                      La Vegabond is one of my favorite streaming shows.
                      97 2859

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by MonteVista View Post

                        Well, cut the chain appears right but may be not so fast! I encountered a similar situation when my own chain got loose and wrapped around my prop while cruising at 24mph!. In my case the chain+anchor just went over the duo props once and hung down into the depths while the other end of the chain was still attached to the windlass. This meant that I could feed more chain from the windlass and the chain would slide over the shaft to continue its travel and keep going downwards into the sea. IF this is the case, there is a solution that does not require cutting the chain. Here is how it would work;

                        1) First tie a rope to the chain at/near the bow and the windlass. Then tie the rope securely to a cleat that can carry the combined weight of the chain and anchor.
                        2) Unwind the windlass to let all of the chain out (preferably onto your deck). This is the key; as you release more chain the weight of the existing chain dangling from the shaft should cause the chain to slide over the shaft and keep going down the other side. Otherwise, this method won't work. If necessary and possible you can dive down and help pull the chain over the shaft.
                        3) When the end of the chain is reached, tie another rope to the end of the chain. After releasing sufficient chain/rope so that only the rope is on the shaft (i.e. all chain has slid off), tie the other end of the second rope to another cleat.
                        4) Now the chain is hanging off of 2 ropes, one (first rope) tied at the beginning and second that is tied to the end of the chain. At this point cut the rope around the shaft/propeller. that will free your prop/shaft from the chain.
                        5) Use the first rope that is still attached to the chain and the boat to pull the chain back onto the boat. The combined weight of chain and anchor will be too much to pull by hand; Try to wrap the chain around the gypsy of the windlass so the windlass can do the work for you.

                        I was able to do something like this and saved my 250 ft x 8mm chrome-plated chain + Ultra anchor (roughly $3500 total).

                        Happy cruising to all
                        Thanks for this information.

                        Comment

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