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    Dry rot common?

    Hi all, heard a few people around my local marina talk about dry rot, is it something bayliners are subjected to easy? I have a 1999 3055,
    everything seems ok? I’m a newbie as you probably all can tell by now :-)

    #2
    Soft wood aka dry rot is common to any wood that gets near fresh water. Houses have the same problem. Ever heard about a major bathroom rebuild because of a water leak?
    With fiberglass boats, any brand, wherever there is wood reinforcement there is an opportunity for rot. If fasteners and penetrations are properly bedded in the appropriate compound, there isn’t an issue as long as the bedding is inspected and replaced when needed. If fresh water is allowed to wick down along any unprotected penetration and sits, rot will start. The classic situation is that the factory will do everything correctly then the selling dealer will add an option like a depth finder transducer and the tech will do a poor job of sealing the fasteners or through hull. Possibly because of little or no training, certainly no knowledge of why bedding is important or just plain laziness. Owners are worse. Most really don’t understand why it is important.
    Yes, it’s messy. You know those Clorox wipes? They clean it right up, except the part on your clothes. Don’t ask why would know that.
    I’m guessing you had a marine survey done as part of your purchase process. If not, have a condition and valuation survey done then you can go shopping for Yacht Insurance which is an agreed value type where the value of a total loss is set at the time the policy is issued. If your agent doesn’t offer a competitive rate, coverage can be coordinated. I found by doing a bit of shopping that I could get more bang for my buck by going to an agency that focused on boats and yachts.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
    MMSI 367770440
    1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
    Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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      #3
      More or less then any other boat or brand? I have no idea...any untreated wood exposed to moisture for any period of time is subject to any kind of rot. Dry rot is rot that is caused by fungus attacking moist wood. Fungal spores exist pretty much anywhere...

      Keep your boat dry
      . . .It places the lotion in the Basket. . .and that basket happens to be in a 1987 Bayliner 3870 w/ Hino 175's

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        #4
        Is it treatable if any if any is found?

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          #5
          There is a product called "Git Rot" that wicks into the rotted wood and restores it. I haven't used it but someone else here probably has.
          2007 Discovery 246
          300mpi BIII
          Welcome island Lake Superior

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            #6
            Treatment depends on where and how much. Then there are personal opinions and preferences. The most common place in recreational boats is the transom, for two reasons. The first is unbedded fasteners, the second is the drain plug. For some reason manufacturers drill the hole for the drain through the plywood reinforcement and bed the threaded fitting up the hull; trouble is, they don’t line the hole in the plywood allowing water to have direct access to unprotected wood. Head smack time! Larger boats don’t have a plug, so not an issue. It’s all fixable, but it’s kinda like a wrecked car, at what point do you want to pay for repairs against selling and taking the loss.
            Prevention is the obvious answer, and it’s not difficult. Fresh water is the number one enemy in this fight with salt water coming in second. Keep water from standing where it should be draining. Make sure the limber holes, the drain holes in your stringers and bulkheads in the bilge are lined and clear. If they are lined there will be a short length of thin wall pvc through the hole and glassed in. If not, you can install some by drying the heck out of the limber hole area, google the process as there are several depending on the situation, then you can insert your own liner using 5200 as a sealing compound. 4200 will let you get bedded parts apart, with effort, 5200, not so much as in extremely difficult to get apart.
            P/C Pete
            Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
            1988 3818 "GLAUBEN
            Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
            1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
            MMSI 367770440
            1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
            Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

            Comment


              #7
              dry rot is not nearly as common in a boat, as opposed to "wet" rot. dry rot, if caught in time is relatively easy to stop, but if the wet wood in a boat remains wet, it will rot in time no matter what.
              wood that gets saturated often, but is fully exposed so that it can dry out, can last for many years.
              but its the wood below decks, or that which is encapsulated and never drys, will rot rather quickly. and there is NO stopping the rot, other than drying the wood out before damage is done, and sealing it up so moisture cant get to it.

              dry rot on the other hand is a fungus that spreads thru wood no matter if its dry or wet... its common, but the thing that gets boats is usually just the wet...
              1989 Bayliner 2556, 5.7 OMC Cobra

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