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    Trailer Tires ...from another thread

    From the other thread, I wrote:

    Over-inflate trailer tires? I just did an overhaul on my trailer tires. I noticed that the wear is very inconsistent, and to me, extreme. I've towed trailers all my life and never seen the kind of wear, though this trailer is carrying the most the weight I've ever towed. I also have a torsion system, so I understand that wear can be different between tires.

    You guys are saying that over-inflating them will make them last longer? I keep mine between 60 and 65lbs due to some advice I received on here, and based on what is printed on the sidewall.

    http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/in...-of-boc#576262


    Here is the right rear trailer tire wear. This one was the worst, so I moved it to the spare and put the 'new' spare on. The other side rear tire is almost as bad. The two front tires are worn, but still have plenty of tread.



    The most wear is on the outside and on the rear tires.



    These were pretty much new when we bought the boat and trailer in July or 2014, and considering I travel 17 miles and back in one direction (to PA Haven Marina) and 5 miles each way to JWM, that equates to a total of about 1,000 miles. This amount of wear seems very extreme. I will also say that I have never had a torsion trailer, so I have no idea if this is normal. I also thought that putting too much air in the tires would make the boat ride too rough.

    Thoughts? Do I need to increase the tire pressure? If so, to what?

    I should also add that I switched the drum brakes to discs, and replaced the bearings and races. When I just did the maintenance, the grease is good, no water intrusion and the bearings, races, seals and spindles are like new.
    "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
    MMSI: 367637220
    HAM: KE7TTR
    TDI tech diver
    BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
    Kevin

    #2
    I don't have a trailer like yours but I had the same type of wear on my single axle trailer and had to replace the axle because it was bent .No more problem.

    Comment


      #3


      Not sure torsion axles can bend. They look good to me.


      Attached files

      "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
      MMSI: 367637220
      HAM: KE7TTR
      TDI tech diver
      BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
      Kevin

      Comment


        #4
        Your tire wear is not due to under-inflation. If it was, the wear would be on both tire outside edges, not jut one edge. It appears to be wear due to incorrect camber. If the wear is on the inside only it could be a bent spindle, bad or loose bearings, overloading, or worn torsion rubbers. If it's on the outside only it could be a bent spindle, or bad or loose bearings.

        Here's a good article on checking trailer axle alignment. It might help you get to the bottom of the problem: http://www.centrevilletrailer.com/ho...ar/#multi-axle
        1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
        2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
        Anacortes, WA
        Isla Verde, PR

        Comment


          #5
          Norton Rider said it it about as good as possible...

          but I will add that with these new trailer tires we get today, I have found that you NEED to keep them inflated to the max pressure as stated on the tire for maximum life... an under inflated tire creates a lot more heat than an over inflated tire does.... the only danger running over inflated tires is that it can wear the center of the tread, or be more prone to rupture when hitting a pot hole or curb at a high speed.

          I have 5 trailer in the fleet, and I have tried to run less pressure to soften the ride, but it costs tires, thru wear, and broken belts which ultimately result in many more blowouts... at full inflation, the tires last as they should and I have never had a blowout since changing my ways. in my experience, when its trailer tires, over inflated is always better than under inflated.

          and the torsion axles.. they are nice, but the rubbers DO get worn or take a set that can change the alignment of the wheels. this is their only downside...


          NU LIBERTE'
          Salem, OR

          1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
          5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
          N2K equipped throughout..
          2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
          2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
          '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
          Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

          Comment


            #6
            "Norton Rider" post=828299 wrote:
            Your tire wear is not due to under-inflation. If it was, the wear would be on both tire outside edges, not jut one edge. It appears to be wear due to incorrect camber. If the wear is on the inside only it could be a bent spindle, bad or loose bearings, overloading, or worn torsion rubbers. If it's on the outside only it could be a bent spindle, or bad or loose bearings.

            Here's a good article on checking trailer axle alignment. It might help you get to the bottom of the problem: http://www.centrevilletrailer.com/ho...ar/#multi-axle
            I read the article and am not sure it applies to a torsion system as I understand it. To my understanding, there are rubber strips inside the square tubing that hold the part that connects to the spindle. These rubber pieces tend to allow the tires to move around. I know this because of this - a photo I took in the middle of a hard turn.

            [attachment]42215 wrote:
            BonDCTrailerTorsionAxle.jpg[/attachment]

            I showed this to the mechanic who helped me purge the new disc brakes, and his exact comment was, "That's normal for a torsion axle trailer." Then he described what I wrote above. BTW, the greatest wear was on the tire in the opposite corner. Also, this was right after I'd changed over to disc brakes, which means new everything from the spindles out. What is really strange is the tread on that tire is still in very good condition.

            Is it possible the square metal tube holding the rubber pieces has shifted, or is it somehow locked into place? But even if it did, wouldn't the wear bow on the outside on one side and the inside on the other? For that matter, they'd be working against each other, so the all 4 would have one side or the other worn.
            "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
            MMSI: 367637220
            HAM: KE7TTR
            TDI tech diver
            BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
            Kevin

            Comment


              #7
              "CptCrunchie" post=828306 wrote:
              "Norton Rider" post=828299 wrote:
              Your tire wear is not due to under-inflation. If it was, the wear would be on both tire outside edges, not jut one edge. It appears to be wear due to incorrect camber. If the wear is on the inside only it could be a bent spindle, bad or loose bearings, overloading, or worn torsion rubbers. If it's on the outside only it could be a bent spindle, or bad or loose bearings.

              Here's a good article on checking trailer axle alignment. It might help you get to the bottom of the problem: http://www.centrevilletrailer.com/ho...ar/#multi-axle
              I read the article and am not sure it applies to a torsion system as I understand it. To my understanding, there are rubber strips inside the square tubing that hold the part that connects to the spindle. These rubber pieces tend to allow the tires to move around. I know this because of this - a photo I took in the middle of a hard turn.

              [attachment]42215 wrote:
              BonDCTrailerTorsionAxle.jpg[/attachment]

              I showed this to the mechanic who helped me purge the new disc brakes, and his exact comment was, "That's normal for a torsion axle trailer." Then he described what I wrote above. BTW, the greatest wear was on the tire in the opposite corner. Also, this was right after I'd changed over to disc brakes, which means new everything from the spindles out. What is really strange is the tread on that tire is still in very good condition.

              Is it possible the square metal tube holding the rubber pieces has shifted, or is it somehow locked into place? But even if it did, wouldn't the wear bow on the outside on one side and the inside on the other? For that matter, they'd be working against each other, so the all 4 would have one side or the other worn.
              its highly possible that they have shifted..

              torsion axles are nice, but their only downside is that the rubbers DO get worn or take a set that can change the alignment of the wheels.... its not unheard of to have this happen rather quickly to nearly new torsion axles.. its not common, but it happens. probably due to a faulty assembly procedure...

              torsion axles are usually less prone to bending in hard turns or due to overloading than spring axles are, so its highly likely it is the rubber inserts that have allowed the misalignment.


              NU LIBERTE'
              Salem, OR

              1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
              5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
              N2K equipped throughout..
              2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
              2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
              '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
              Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

              Comment


                #8
                "CptCrunchie" post=828306 wrote:


                I read the article and am not sure it applies to a torsion system as I understand it. To my understanding, there are rubber strips inside the square tubing that hold the part that connects to the spindle. These rubber pieces tend to allow the tires to move around. I know this because of this - a photo I took in the middle of a hard turn.

                I showed this to the mechanic who helped me purge the new disc brakes, and his exact comment was, "That's normal for a torsion axle trailer." Then he described what I wrote above. BTW, the greatest wear was on the tire in the opposite corner. Also, this was right after I'd changed over to disc brakes, which means new everything from the spindles out. What is really strange is the tread on that tire is still in very good condition.

                Is it possible the square metal tube holding the rubber pieces has shifted, or is it somehow locked into place? But even if it did, wouldn't the wear bow on the outside on one side and the inside on the other? For that matter, they'd be working against each other, so the all 4 would have one side or the other worn.
                its highly possible that they have shifted..

                torsion axles are nice, but their only downside is that the rubbers DO get worn or take a set that can change the alignment of the wheels.... its not unheard of to have this happen rather quickly to nearly new torsion axles.. its not common, but it happens. probably due to a faulty assembly procedure...

                torsion axles are usually less prone to bending in hard turns or due to overloading than spring axles are, so its highly likely it is the rubber inserts that have allowed the misalignment.


                NU LIBERTE'
                Salem, OR

                1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
                5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
                N2K equipped throughout..
                2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
                2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
                '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
                Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

                Comment


                  #9
                  From the photos I posted, are you guys saying I'm under-inflating the tires?

                  Is there a solution to this wear, or is it a symptom of torsion axles? I was hoping to take the boat to Westport 120 miles SW of here in a week or two, but am concerned about blowing out a tire.
                  "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
                  MMSI: 367637220
                  HAM: KE7TTR
                  TDI tech diver
                  BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
                  Kevin

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I have two trailers with torsion axles and the tires on both wear evenly. As I mentioned in my previous post, the torsion rubbers on your trailer may be worn.

                    You mentioned that this started after a bunch of work. Based on this, you may want to check for loose bearings or bearings not pressed in completely.

                    BTW, the article that I linked early applies to any trailer. Regardless of which type of suspension a trailer has, the axles need to be in alignment.
                    1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                    2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                    Anacortes, WA
                    Isla Verde, PR

                    Comment


                      #11
                      You need to find a trailer service company that knows what to look for on torsion axles, and that knows alignment procedures, you do have issues.

                      I also have a torsion axle trailer, same boat as yours and my tires wear so evenly that it never crosses my mind to even bother to rotate them.
                      " WET EVER "
                      1989 2459 TROPHY OFFSHORE 5.8L COBRA / SX
                      mmsi 338108404
                      mmsi 338124956
                      "I started with nothing and still have most of it left"

                      Comment


                        #12
                        With the maneuvers you do launching, parking, turning into parking lots, basically anything where the towing vehicle is more than about ten degrees out of alignment with the trailer, some scrubbing is going to take place. Just look at the trucks with auxiliary drop down axles. Those tires are a wreck in no time.

                        You may get some relief by getting the axles aligned and the camber correct. I had the "twin I beam" suspension adjusted. They locked the beam down then used a bottle jack to bend the bar. Then they should make sure one axle is perpendicular to the frame, then adjust the other to be parallel. It will probably cost about as much as a set of trailer tires I'm guessing.
                        P/C Pete
                        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                        MMSI 367770440

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Just look at the picture closely and you can see that that front tire has an inward angle at the bottom. You are way out true there, that's what's wearing the outside edge like it is. You're going to have to get that wheel off and find out what happened to the rubber mountings. Makes me glad I have good old fashion Springs and I think I have the identical trailer minus those rubber :silly: axles.

                          You should be able to pull the wheel , just yank the wheel bearings not the wheel lugs. You'll probably have to pull the mounting plate , 4 bolts. Pull it down out of way and straight edge and or try square. You're probably going to be able to see the misalignment anyways.

                          Go see the local trailer and spring shop and see what he says to fix it. Ask him what might have done it, like overweight load ect. Show him that picture and pic of tire. You should able to do the work yourself just getting the part. Check it against the cost for a new axle. Sharpie match marks where it locates if you remove it. It could well be easier and cheaper to simply buy a new replacement as these axles are one of the few things left in the world that are fairly generic so no dealers involved.

                          It's probably got 3500 lb axles like mine . If weight might be a cause consider upgrading that axle , it's not much more to up it and I think the bearings stay the same . The spring shop can advise you on all this stuff and get you what fits.

                          Well you got it rolled up On block or jacked might as well go ahead and do the wheelbearings on that side at least get it over with while it's up in the air .:cheer:

                          Comment


                            #14
                            a bad tire can cause itself to wear uneven.... an ST tire can go bad if its not fully inflated to its recommended pressure, so only you know if you are running them under inflated..

                            as for the axles, to do a quick check of the alignment yourself, try this...

                            if you have someone to help you (maybe 2 people), you take some scraps of perfectly straight trim or other material (to use as a straight edge), you need 2 pieces that would lay against the sidewall of the tires from top to bottom, but just short of touching the ground or the fender.....

                            after pulling the trailer in a straight line to releave any side thrust stress that may be on the tires, have the helper hold the straight edges to each of the tires at the same time (on one side) in an up and down position.... then you get back behind the trailer about 20-30 feet and sight down the straight edges to see if the camber in both wheels are within spec.... they shouldnt be out from one another over a 1/4 inch.....

                            afterwards. hold the straight edges in a fore-and-aft position against the, tires and sight down them... the straight edges should align perfectly parallel to one another...... the axles may be out of track with one another a little, which is ok, but the wheels should be perfectly parallel....

                            now do the other side..... this will tell you if you need some axle work done or if the tire itself may be the problem...

                            if you find a problem this way on both sides, measure center of hub to center of hub of the wheels (on each side) to see if the axles are out of alignment with one another... the measurements should be within a 1/4" to be within reason, but within 1/8" to be within spec.....


                            NU LIBERTE'
                            Salem, OR

                            1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
                            5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
                            N2K equipped throughout..
                            2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
                            2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
                            '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
                            Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Here's a way to determine if the rubbers in the suspension are bad:

                              Pull the trailer straight forward on level ground. Put a straightedge vertically on the suspension swing arm and measure from the top and bottom of the straightedge it to fixed points on the trailer. Pull the trailer into a hard left turn. Use the straightedge to take the same measurements again. Pull the trailer to the right and repeat the measurements. Do this for the same axle on both sides of the trailer. Compare the measurements you get for each side. If the swing arm on the side with the worn tire is showing more camber (in/out tilt) change than the opposite side, there's something wrong with the torsion suspension rubbers. If there's not much difference from one side to the other, the issue may be a bent axle, bad bearings, etc.

                              The sketch below shows where to put the straightedge:


                              Attached files

                              1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                              2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                              Anacortes, WA
                              Isla Verde, PR

                              Comment

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