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Some follow ups and reminders that it can(39)t hurt to repeat-gctid828174

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    Some follow ups and reminders that it can(39)t hurt to repeat-gctid828174

    First, some lessons on trailer tires I should have learned from previous posters but bit me because of inattention:

    1. Do NOT run your trailer on under inflated tires, even by a few pounds. I had trouble finding places to inflate my trailer tires to the proper pressure that were easily accessible to my trailer. Don't know why gas stations tuck their air stations so that you have to back the trailer up to reach them or where it's almost impossible to back into, but they do. So I ran a few long trips in warm weather with my tires about 15% underinflated. I have a single axle trailer and the factory tires were at the load limits anyway. I was lucky to make it to the dealer where I've now had them replaced. Bald, bald, bald. I now have my own compressor and run them at recommended inflation for full load.

    2. Don't leave your tires uncovered in the sun. The spare dry rotted in 3 years. Buy or rig some cheap covers. The running tires may have deteriorated because of this as well.

    3. Don't exceed the speed rating, even by 10%. Again, it seems a lot of trailers with a fully loaded boat are right at the load limits and exceeding the rated speed in that situation accelerates wear a lot.

    Second, follow up on my thermostat-induced guardian mode power reduction. Here, late in the season in 2016, I went aground in a gravel bar on an Ohio tributary because of some missing nav buoys. Pea gravel got into the cooling system and ruined a thermostat. Thermostat fixed but pea gravel remnants still in the system so 2017 had the same problem. Made sure dealer not only replaced thermostat, noted proper engine warming, and ran at 3500 + rpms for several minutes to make sure no more was dislodged. Now, when I put in in 2018, there is still a chance this will happen again so will have spare, tools, and know how to fix myself to save my season. Dealer is great but backlogs etc can still ruin the useable part of the season.

    Hope these things help someone in the future.
    Bayliner 195 Bowrider 2013 4.3l 220hp MPI
    Alpha 1, Gen II
    2019 F-150 3.0l Powerstroke Crew Cab 4WD
    Albany, Ohio

    MMSI: 338234042

    King of retirement. Finally got that last promotion.

    #2
    +1 to that.

    Also make sure you are running trailer tires.

    Most trailer tires are speed rated for 65mph (104km/h).

    If you must use car or light truck tires, the load rating on the tire is the maximum when used on a passenger vehicle, when used on a trailer the load rating is reduced by 10% if memory serves me.
    Joel
    1987 3818 Hino 175
    "Knotty Girl"
    Prince Rupert B.C.

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      #3
      In my experience, Its better to over inflate. In my truck driving days we were going through high cube van trailer tires like crazy. They were inflated as recommended and bit, at around 50 pounds. I was talking with a driver from another company and he told me to pump the up to 90 pounds and the problem will go away. I did and it did. The flexing of the tires when under load creates heat and they come apart pretty quickly.
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      MMSI 367770440

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        #4
        "Pcpete" post=828185 wrote:
        In my experience, Its better to over inflate. In my truck driving days we were going through high cube van trailer tires like crazy. They were inflated as recommended and bit, at around 50 pounds. I was talking with a driver from another company and he told me to pump the up to 90 pounds and the problem will go away. I did and it did. The flexing of the tires when under load creates heat and they come apart pretty quickly.
        Yep. I can watch my tires in my rear view mirrors and they do need to be a bit overinflated when the boat is loaded with fuel and gear to prevent obvious flexing. Not sure I would go to almost 100% over, but a few pounds, yes.
        Bayliner 195 Bowrider 2013 4.3l 220hp MPI
        Alpha 1, Gen II
        2019 F-150 3.0l Powerstroke Crew Cab 4WD
        Albany, Ohio

        MMSI: 338234042

        King of retirement. Finally got that last promotion.

        Comment


          #5
          I have a beefy 12 V compressor that I rigged up with alligator clips and 50 feet of heavy-duty wire (courtesy of an extension chord) so I can get to my trailer tires without disconnecting the trailer from my truck. And I go straight to the battery because I have blown fuses in cigarette lighters plugs before, that's how beefy this compressor is.
          Esteban
          Huntington Beach, California
          2018 Element 16
          Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida
          Former Bayliners: 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

          Comment


            #6
            "canoel" post=828176 wrote:
            +1 to that.

            Also make sure you are running trailer tires.

            Most trailer tires are speed rated for 65mph (104km/h).

            If you must use car or light truck tires, the load rating on the tire is the maximum when used on a passenger vehicle, when used on a trailer the load rating is reduced by 10% if memory serves me.
            A few years ago I was on a flight seated next to a tire company engineer. He told me that passenger car tire designs assume that the tires will seldom see their maximum load rating. Light truck tires (the ones that are actually LT rated) and trailer tires (ST) are designed assuming they will be at their max load rating all the time. He mentioned that ST tires also have additional UV and Ozone protection in the rubber compound. The reason is that these tires are exposed to the elements for more years than auto or light truck tires because they are not used as much. He said that passenger car tires should not be used on a trailer, but LT tires are OK to use with no rating reduction. He did caution that LT tires will degrade due to environmental conditions faster than ST tires.
            1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
            2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
            Anacortes, WA
            Isla Verde, PR

            Comment


              #7
              As far as tire compressors, we have used the Viair 300P on the beach a lot when 4-wheeling and it works great, very fast. There we are airing up from 10-12 psi back to abut 40 or so for the Jeeps. These hook right up to the battery so no blown fuses.

              The cooling system issue, is common with raw water cooling, debris, sand, small marine organisms can all accumulate in the cooling system. One of the down sides of raw water cooling.

              I've wondered if this is a good idea:

              Every few years, or when you have a hard to cure running hot problem, pick up an extra pair of circulating pump gaskets. Then drain the water out of the engine via the drain plugs and the big front hose. Next remove the front circulation pump. Then rig up a way to put a garden hose into one of the ports for the water pump in the block, and use low water pressure to flush out the block and heads. I bet a lot of sand, grit, rust flakes etc will come out! Then close drain plugs and re-install pump with new gaskets.
              88 Four Winns 200 Horizon 4.3 OMC
              98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0/Selectrac
              07 Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7 Hemi/Quadradrive II

              Long Island Sound Region

              Comment


                #8
                If you have a regular air compressor at home another alternative is one of these: https://www.harborfreight.com/5-gall...ank-65594.html. I have one and take it with me whenever I'm going to pick up my boat trailer at the storage place. It has enough capacity to top off the tires. Incidentally, Harbor Freight also sells a 7-gallon aluminum tank as well as an 11 gallon steel tank.
                1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                Anacortes, WA
                Isla Verde, PR

                Comment


                  #9
                  Over-inflate trailer tires? I just did an overhaul on my trailer tires. I noticed that the wear is very inconsistent, and to me, extreme. I've towed trailers all my life and never seen the kind of wear, though this trailer is carrying the most the weight I've ever towed. I also have a torsion system, so I understand that wear can be different between tires.

                  You guys are saying that over-inflating them will make them last longer? I keep mine between 60 and 65lbs due to some advice I received on here, and based on what is printed on the sidewall.

                  http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/in...-of-boc#576262

                  I'm off to the boat, will take photos of the wear and post them in a new thread.
                  "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
                  MMSI: 367637220
                  HAM: KE7TTR
                  TDI tech diver
                  BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
                  Kevin

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