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Neverending maintenance what have you changed in the last 12mths?-gctid821894

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    Neverending maintenance what have you changed in the last 12mths?-gctid821894

    So i have had my Bayliner 288 for pretty much a year and how much i have spent on it *eyes water*, its without saying lots! What i cant get my head around is how much maintenance I am finding I am doing. Luckily for me none of this is engine related, but mostly ship related systems randomly failing. Here is a quick run down of what i have had to repair/replace. The boat is a Bayliner 288, the only thing i can think of is that the electrical systems are coming to end of life which is why i have such a high rate of failures, its driving me mad!

    Fuel Sender packed in, replaced

    Temp gauge (flybridge) packed in, replaced

    Temp alarm sender not working, replaced.

    Bow thruster stopped working, Main control unit dead, replaced

    Macerator stopped working, replaced

    UP Trim on stern drive stopped working, replaced solonoid

    Then i noticed the trim pump bracket was corroded to mush so replaced with stainless steel.

    Leaking upper square shaft seal, replaced

    Hot water Faucet stopped working, blockage

    Stern drive trim switch stopped working on flybridge,replaced

    Thats just off the top of my head, there is most likely more!

    #2
    Some of what you are seeing is "deferred maintenance" meaning "let the new owner fix it". Even a new boat takes time to work things out and make it yours. Many of the items, like the macerator, are items that need to be cycled often. You will find that this kinds of repairs will taper off as you use the boat. And that's the key, use the boat. Just like an auto that isn't used often runs poorly for a time, boats are worse.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    MMSI 367770440

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      #3
      thats what i keep telling my self, plough through the faults until i get to some kind of reliability!

      Comment


        #4
        You may want to go through your electric connections with a wire brush and a very small amount of dielectric grease to clean up the contacts and slow down any new corrosion. As you winterize the boat, seal the engine Bay vents and put a low temperature bilge heater in there, same with the helm area. That and some air drying product will give you a better start to the new season.

        Btw, I'd be happy to trade lists, mines longer and uglier. It started with the black water hoses. :sick:
        P/C Pete
        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
        MMSI 367770440

        Comment


          #5
          Bring Out Another Thousand. . . .

          My little 2452 is exactly the same. Had it 10 years or thereabouts and it has been nothing but trouble. That is just what boats are like. My Marine Engineer buddy suspects that 90% of the boats in my marine are incapable of moving. He may be exaggerating but I doubt it.

          Terry
          Terry (Retired Diving Instructor and Part Time IT Consultant)
          1998 Bayliner 2452. 5.7l V8 - Edelbrock 1409 4bbl - Alpha1Gen2 - Solent UK.
          MMSI 235061726

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            #6
            Those 2858's and 2859's are notorious for eating the trimp pump bracket. I replaced mine too with a stainless one.

            Other repairs since I bought the boat 2.5 years ago:

            Exhaust manifold, spacer, and elbows...Mercruiser parts $$$$$

            Raw water pump...Johnson...much better $$$

            Batteries $$$

            Shower drain pump...replaced system with bilge pump in box, quiet!!! $

            Shift cable and bellows $$$$

            House water pump...$$

            Optional...floor hatch and wood floor...$$

            Much cheaper than a new boat and no payment other than fuel and booze.

            Oh, I forgot...

            Replaced all fuel lines to include filler hose and vent, they were leaking like a drip irrigation system due to being made before ethanol was invented. Replace yours soon!

            Also forgot, power steering pump...used a non marine NAPA one ...$
            Esteban
            Huntington Beach, California
            2018 Element 16
            Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida
            Former Bayliners: 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

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              #7
              I bought my 1995 2859 a year ago and decided once i started to fix things that i might as well get right into it and take a year of working on it to make it mine. Hate it when things break while your out on the boat using up vacation time.

              My list is so long that i can not list it all here. At last glance i think i had worked on/rebuilt/replaced approx 65 different items. Then i got into rebuilding the transom and stringers and replaced the 22 year old fuel tank. And i rebuilt the motor while it was out.

              Still working on it and have a list of things yet to be done. Should be a new boat front to back when done tho! Hundreds of hours of labour and thousands of dollars spent!
              Doug
              1995 2859 -extensively rebuilt/restored 2016/17
              496 big block - Bravo ll leg
              The Doghouse
              Prince George BC

              Comment


                #8
                I told my wife I would name the boat after her: Spoiled Brat She gets what ever she wants.

                She wouldn't go for the name, but the boat gets what she wants and she wants to be maintained, and that takes time and money. More money if you don't have the time.

                Keeps you off the street. I spend almost every Tuesday night after work at the boat, even through the winter with the goal of doing 'something' and there is always something.

                I love it.
                Tally and Vicki
                "Wickus" Meridian 341
                MMSI 338014939

                Comment


                  #9
                  its a boat and maintenance is the life story of them... anyone who says their boat doesnt need maintenance either has a row boat, or a new boat that hasnt been used yet so they dont know what it needs, or the maintenance is all caught up for the moment, or more likely they are not doing proper maintenance on it, in which case they or the future owner of it will have a lot of catching up to do to get it right.

                  boats that get a lot of loving attention usually have less need of a lot of maintenance all at once, but over a 10year span, the cost will be about the same for boats of equal size and outfitted the same...

                  but there are extreme cases too, because one cant polish up a POS and expect it to be any more than the POS it was before, so even though it may look decent, it may need a LOT of money and work to bring it up to standard, maybe more than its worth.

                  where one may be able to drive a new vehicle many, many thousands of miles without anymore input or effort other than getting in it and turning the key and driving... boats on the other hand need work everytime they go out. sometimes before sailing, sometimes after sailing,... it may only be preventive maintenance, but if it doesnt get done, and done properly, the real work will soon follow....

                  it usually takes freshwater boats longer for the "delayed" maintenance issues to get serious, but its rare that the issues are any less expensive to repair.

                  the majority of boat owners only keep the maintenance up to the point where the boat will take them out and probably bring them back, while so many other "less important" systems on the boat are being neglected because they have nothing to do with making the boat start up and go.

                  here is a bit of time proven advice.... the most affordable way to own a boat is to stay on top of all maintenance issues and spend the money necessary to do it right the first time... with this practice, the boat and its systems will always be "turn-key" ready when you want to use it.... and if you decide to sell, the boat will be in a condition that will dramatically increase your chances of getting the full market value for it, and a fairly quick sale.... which allows you the best chance of getting some of your maintenance costs back out of it..

                  it is my opinion that the only thing worse than a boat that is ill kept and run down but gets you there and back, is a poorly maintained boat that the owner thinks is ready to go at a moments notice, but needs worked on when it gets to the ramp for launch... very rarely is it the boats fault.


                  NU LIBERTE'
                  Salem, OR

                  1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
                  5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
                  N2K equipped throughout..
                  2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
                  2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
                  '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
                  Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

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                    #10
                    Black water, lift mufflers, vents and electronic ignition for.me this year. After three owner's of you know what it was time. The macerator and Y valve along with all the old rubber hose is gone.

                    You might say this boat was ridden hard and put back in the barn wet. But it was all worth it.....kinda
                    Dan
                    Frostbite Falls, Minnesota
                    Claudia V. III
                    1988 - 3218
                    Gas Drives

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                      #11
                      Thanks for these posts. Have been shopping for a used 2858, but I have a lot of friends with boats and might not end up using it very often. I have enough maintenance on the house. So think I will just let a friend keep their boat on my lift and use it in exchange.

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                        #12
                        Got a 2850 Contessa in January. Replacing manifolds and risers, head gaskets and yesterday replaced the very dim cabin lights with LED's. Bought a new teak oval for the L seat. I have underwater lights to instal. Many more plans for upgrades$$$ Love It!!
                        Ted G
                        The Great PNW

                        86 2850 Contessa SB
                        Designers Edition
                        Mercury 350 Mag
                        290 Volvo DP

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                          #13
                          I really don't keep track. We live aboard for the entire season in an area where it is difficult to get parts. I carry a lot of spare parts and tools. I fix what needs with what I have. What I can't repair I make a list. Each fall I attempt to fix all on the list after layup. Last fall I replaced the satellite dish. Also the switch that switches from shore power to genny power. Had to do some creative wiring to get through the season and added an automatic transfer switch instead of the original manual switch. I don't like to leave anything until spring. I don't like to leave anything partly done either. The reason is at my age I just may not make it back in the spring and I want the boat to be ready to go.
                          As an example of what I carry. I have a spare inverter charger. I had one fail one season and it was not good with only the original charger which I left as a backup. I have a spare genny in case the diesel fails. Of course filters, pump impellers and even a complete oil change aboard. I have battery operated jig saw, skil saw, sawsall, sanders and a large assortment of electrical parts and stainless nuts, bolts, and screws. I can repair any canvas snap. I have varnish for the bright work. I even have a spare trolling motor for the fishing boat we tow. I have backup electronics except the radar. I like to be prepared.
                          Doug
                          Started boating 1955
                          Number of boats owned 32
                          Bayliners
                          2655
                          2755
                          2850
                          3870 presently owned
                          Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

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