Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

White powder coming off from boat washing-gctid813928

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    White powder coming off from boat washing-gctid813928

    My 1986 boat has been out in the sun and the weather all of her life. I just moved her to a covered berth. I gave her a power wash yesterday. I am going to apply rubbing compound and then wax her next week. When I washed her some white stuff came off with the wash water. Is that part of the gel coat? Is there anything you would suggest that I do? I have been waxing her once a year and she looked ok after with the wax but not a real great shiny.

    Thanks,

    Joe
    1986 2850 Commend Bridge on hydrohoist
    A260 and AQ280 with DP lower unit

    #2
    I hope i am wrong, but i had something similar with my previous boat, as i had some damage on my gelcoat and made a professional company fix it.

    They told me that the overall gel coat on the boat was getting chalky and that showed on several places. That is also what i experienced before, Tried sanding/polishing with 3m and the blue hull was like a mirror but the white top was a different story nothing really helped. My boat was from 2003.

    Comment


      #3
      Joe, that "chalky residue IS the GelCoat coming off due to oxidation from usage, weather and the years taking the toll as they do on all our boats. We really can't stop it but we CAN slow the process down. But don't panic. It's a thick layer and you should have plenty left to work with. It can be a pain to get all the oxidization off. but it ALL needs to be removed to allow you to compound and polish the shine back. Mine was very weathered too and white color overall with red/blue striping. It almost looked light gray on the flat horizontal surfaces it was so badly weathered. To do it right on this initial restoring process, it's going to take time and elbow grease but the results will prove well worth the effort (or expense if you hire it done) and it sounds like the blue isn't as bad so you may be good with just polishing and waxing them but I'd for sure polish the whole boat before waxing to ensure it doesn't get to the point the horizontal surfaces are. There are a LOT of procedures and opinions on restoring GelCoat to it's former luster and gloss. I suggest you get on YouTube and start getting familiar with what's involved and getting things together over summer. Boating season's upon us so I'd suggest just a deep cleaning to get you through and during winter, when there's time in the evenings, start another deep cleaning and continue rest of the restoration project Here's what I did. You're going to really do some sort of mechanical cleaning as the pressure washer won't get deep enough into the GelCoat to reach what's still intact. Take a look at YouTube videos for both marine and automotive as they both are informative I used a fairly worn green Scotch Brite pad, a couple of nylon stiff bristle brushes (to scrub the non skid areas) and 2 spray bottles of Foamy Scrubbing Bubbles with bleach. After washing with water I applied the Scrubbing Bubbles and worked the entire exterior surface of the whole boat, working it in with the green pad and a light to a med pressure. I worked about 4X4 ft sections at a time and rinsed. Also gave the non skid a vigorous scrubbing with the brushes. I actually went right over the 1990 vintage red and blue stripes (the one's I chose to keep) on the vertical surfaces with the foam, pad and even the compound and they shined back up too! The whole thing looked like I'd been scrubbing all day! Took maybe 2 hours to do everything but the helm/ cockpit. Once the white "looked" clean, I started with rubbing compound on a buffer. If you're comfortable with rotary polishers , that's the best and fastest way to compound AND polish. If not they can beat you and the finish up pretty badly. TRUST ME! I recommend an orbital buffer. I picked mine up at AutoZone for under $40 If you compound you HAVE to polish afterward to seal the GelCoat before waxing. compounding actually removes the GelCoat down to "fresh' as if it just came out of the mold EXCEPT the compound leaves very fine scratches in that "fresh" surface you just uncovered and the polish will continue removing those and leave you with a finish that should shine nicely without waxing. The waxing will leave that fresh surface protected from the elements and provide UV protection and with a cover or covered berth only require washing every so often ( depending on use) and a thorough cleaning/ waxing at haul out. The liquid cleaner/waxes should be fine after that initial paste waxing to keep the shine going during the season. I am using a softer bristle brush to compound the non skid area so the recessed part will get depth coverage. I spent quite a bit of time on YouTube and the consensus is that 2-3 layers of paste wax over what you've gotten the finish compounded and polished to should protect it. The liquid cleaner/ waxes should then suffice between annual haul out/ cleanings but the paste provides a more durable finish/ layer of protection in the long run. . Mine hadn't had anything done with regards to the care or upkeep of the boat in several years before I got her and I let her sit a year uncovered on top of that. It will not get in that bad a shape again! ! I will be investing in a good quality cover to help protect all the blood sweat and tears I will have invested in restoring the finish. Of course it may be more feasible to just hire that done as it does take time lots of time to bring the shine back but either way you'll be pleased with the results and time as well as money you won't have to spend "down the road" to maintain rather that restore that finish. Good luck!
      Dave
      Restoring/ upgrading: 1990 Ciera Sunbridge 2655 ST, "One Particular Harbour"
      5.7 Mercruiser Alpha 1 Gen 1 (my floating retirement villa if it doesn't kill me first)
      Sold:
      1995 SeaPro 210 C/C "Hydro-Therapy"
      Mariner 150
      Towing with:
      2002 Ford F 350 7.3L Super Duty
      Near High Rock Lake, N.C.

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Dave,

        Thanks for your long and informative writer-up. I appreciate it very much. I was not aware about the need for polishing before reading your article. I have read up on it now and realize that I need to polish between the rubbing compound and waxing steps. I will read up a little more on the website and YouTube before proceeding. What I plan to do is to work on the flybridge outside area first. I think that's the worst area on the boat because it is the area that received the post sun exposure. I think my hull is in much better condition and the non-skid areas are not as bad. With the pressure washer I was able to get in between indent of the non-skid area. So I would leave it alone at this point. I will work on ribbing compound, polishing and waxing in the coming weeks. I do have a buffer and and an orbital water. I do enjoy working on e boat and being on the water. look at it as a replacement to the shrink office! Again thank you very much for your insights.

        Joe
        1986 2850 Commend Bridge on hydrohoist
        A260 and AQ280 with DP lower unit

        Comment


          #5
          here is my 2 cents on the subject I own a 1988 2556 with severe oxidation from the uv sunrays ,the hull was easy came out nice and shiny but the topside wow a challenge so i have tried all 3 M products including rubbing compound and could not get the shine back from oxidation, bought the shurfuld pro polisher and tried with buff magic ,not happy so here is my research and results ,did online research several said wet/ dry sanding ,some body shops i contacted suggested the same ,wet,dry sanding lots of water starting with 800 wipe all residue of then 1000 same procedure final with 2000, now you don't sand the heck out of it just a little lots of water from a bucket or hose while doing it wipe down well and let dry ,then buff magic with the polisher ,then i used a 3000 variable speed dewalt buffer at a bout a 1800 setting ,so my next step will be the pro polish lots of work but i have tried a section of the boat i am very happy with the results still lots of boat left to finish ,so thats my 2 cents on the subject ,i guess its how much of shine do you want? mine is a showroom look
          1988 flybridge trophy bayliner 2556 ,mercury 5.7 lit. OMC cobra out drive 76 hrs. on new package,
          located in ketchikan ak,name DOMINION

          Comment


            #6
            your welcome i have spent a lot of time and expense trying to get the shine back
            1988 flybridge trophy bayliner 2556 ,mercury 5.7 lit. OMC cobra out drive 76 hrs. on new package,
            located in ketchikan ak,name DOMINION

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks Desuch. I will give the compound, polish and wax combination first on a small section. If it doesn't work then I will do the wet sanding as you suggested. I guess it is managable as long as you don't try to rush through it. Now that I have a covered berth, I have more incentive to get and maintain a shine!

              Joe
              1986 2850 Commend Bridge on hydrohoist
              A260 and AQ280 with DP lower unit

              Comment


                #8
                IT IS VERY TIME CONSUMING ITS TAKING ME QUITE AWHILE BUT I REALLY LIKE THE RESULTS TURNING THE OLD BOAT NEW AGAIN,sorry didn't know cap lock was on lol
                1988 flybridge trophy bayliner 2556 ,mercury 5.7 lit. OMC cobra out drive 76 hrs. on new package,
                located in ketchikan ak,name DOMINION

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks Desuch. I will give the compound, polish and wax combination first on a small section. If it doesn't work then I will do the wet sanding as you suggested. I guess it is managable as long as you don't try to rush through it. Now that I have a covered berth, I have more incentive to get and maintain a shine!

                  Joe
                  1986 2850 Commend Bridge on hydrohoist
                  A260 and AQ280 with DP lower unit

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I just had a reply from shurfuld who specialize in boat waxing and also said with severe oxidation one might have to wet sand
                    1988 flybridge trophy bayliner 2556 ,mercury 5.7 lit. OMC cobra out drive 76 hrs. on new package,
                    located in ketchikan ak,name DOMINION

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I just want to provide you an update on my progress. I went to the boat the applied compound to the upper flybridge sides and front. I then applied polish and wax to the port side only. It took me four hours with an electric polisher. I can see a decent shine on the finished side. I tried to take a photo to post but since the boat is in a covered berth there is not enough light for a good photo. I am sure that the shine won't impress most of you, especially those who have their boat at home and protected, but I am quite please with it. I will finish the other side and take the boat out to see how she looks under the sun. If the result is not good enough then I will wet sand on another day, may be the next season!

                      Thanks for all of your help. I will research on how to clean the non-skid deck and ask you for assistant under a new thread.

                      Joe
                      1986 2850 Commend Bridge on hydrohoist
                      A260 and AQ280 with DP lower unit

                      Comment


                        #12
                        "desuch" post=814032 wrote:
                        here is my 2 cents on the subject I own a 1988 2556 with severe oxidation from the uv sunrays ,the hull was easy came out nice and shiny but the topside wow a challenge so i have tried all 3 M products including rubbing compound and could not get the shine back from oxidation, bought the shurfuld pro polisher and tried with buff magic ,not happy so here is my research and results ,did online research several said wet/ dry sanding ,some body shops i contacted suggested the same ,wet,dry sanding lots of water starting with 800 wipe all residue of then 1000 same procedure final with 2000, now you don't sand the heck out of it just a little lots of water from a bucket or hose while doing it wipe down well and let dry ,then buff magic with the polisher ,then i used a 3000 variable speed dewalt buffer at a bout a 1800 setting ,so my next step will be the pro polish lots of work but i have tried a section of the boat i am very happy with the results still lots of boat left to finish ,so thats my 2 cents on the subject ,i guess its how much of shine do you want? mine is a showroom look
                        I found the same... compound wasn't bringing the shine back so I am into the wet-sand mode now. Already had #600 and 800 from other projects. Working my way right each grit up through 3000# (soon as it arrives) and seeing a marked improvement in addition to removing more of the stripe/ decal shadowing as well. Light pressure and very few passes with each grit Found hook and loop brushes on eBay for a third less than the Shurholds, one short for compound and a longer bristle one for the polish. Slowly but surely....
                        Dave
                        Restoring/ upgrading: 1990 Ciera Sunbridge 2655 ST, "One Particular Harbour"
                        5.7 Mercruiser Alpha 1 Gen 1 (my floating retirement villa if it doesn't kill me first)
                        Sold:
                        1995 SeaPro 210 C/C "Hydro-Therapy"
                        Mariner 150
                        Towing with:
                        2002 Ford F 350 7.3L Super Duty
                        Near High Rock Lake, N.C.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          You could just use wax and a cloth and bring it back pretty. Trouble is you'll be a pile of bones next to the boat before you finish :sick: :sick: :sick:

                          Seriously, if you have oxidation coming off or she's looking sorta furry to the touch save yourself and go sandpaper. Get the black stuff - wet or dry (always use it wet ). 2000 will do it but if fuzzy / cloudy looking start with 800 go to 1000 then 2000. Get ya a nice 1qt spray bottle filled with water and a couple drops dish detergent, Work small sections at a time. I marked mine out with a soft lead pencil so I could see where I was working and not wander.

                          An air or even electric palm sander will move things along and you won't end up a cramped up walking round the house like Lobster Man scaring the kids. Hand cramps hurt! You are only spraying a couple spritzes of water to keep the paper from loading up so it will cut well. You're going to see results pretty fast with each successive grit then move on to the compound and low speed buffer.

                          Start on an easy to get at yet not highly visible part of the boat like next to the outdrive. Get the feel of what you're doing there. Not on the side just in case you goof . You won't but you won't worry as much about it right? Tight places and edges , that's where you hand sand. Be careful sanding sharp edges ,!!! Sand off em if using a machine not into them. Reason being you cut much faster into and on sharp edges . It's not such a big deal with gell as it's so thick but just be aware not to grind on em:dry: :dry:

                          It's all 6 pack work so grab a beer get a nice low beach chair and a chunk of soft carpet to lay, sit, crawl around on. Be as comfortable as possible, it helps. As someone said it's into the season so you might want to just pretty her up a bit quick and do it for real in Fall or Spring. After that keep it waxed causeYOU DONT WANNA DO THIS AGAINinch:

                          Comment


                            #14
                            "jmcajmca" post=814555 wrote:
                            I just want to provide you an update on my progress. I went to the boat the applied compound to the upper flybridge sides and front. I then applied polish and wax to the port side only. It took me four hours with an electric polisher. I can see a decent shine on the finished side. I tried to take a photo to post but since the boat is in a covered berth there is not enough light for a good photo. I am sure that the shine won't impress most of you, especially those who have their boat at home and protected, but I am quite please with it. I will finish the other side and take the boat out to see how she looks under the sun. If the result is not good enough then I will wet sand on another day, may be the next season!

                            Thanks for all of your help. I will research on how to clean the non-skid deck and ask you for assistant under a new thread.

                            Joe
                            Joe, I went to Shurhold Univ.( their online videos LOL) and adapted their process for non skid. I'd already gone over everything white on the exterior with a worn red Scotch Brite pad and the foaming Scrubbing Bubbles with bleach and gotten a lot of oxidation broken loose. To save money I ordered a short stiff hook and loop round bristle brush and a 1.5" version too for about half the cost. LOWES actually sells a brush made for SawZalls but found it too small and narrow, not to mention the length of the saw limits where it can be used and the power of the saw and the design can cause it to violently wander over the surface. I've been a Meguairs user for years but started with the short bristle round on the D/A with Ultra Cut 105. Starts very aggressive but the "diminishing abrasives" quickly dissipate. Did the overlap grid then went with the grain on both directions along the diamond pattern. wiped with a towel and water rinsed. The preceding wasn't part of ShurHold's process but when I bought my 2655 last July, it didn't look like it had any TLC since it rolled off the ;line in '90. Surhold has you starting with a cleaner/ polish doing the patterns and wiping the excess. For this step. I used Meguiars 102 finishing polish, wiping the excess afterward. Their final step has you using the softer longer bristle brush with a POLYMER liquid wax. Their video explains the difference and advantage of polymer over traditional waxes. Work it in, wipe excess off and that's it. I plan on using liquid on the non skid and paste polymer (both Meguiars) ) on all other flat areas and carnauba paste everywhere else and evaluating whether i'll continue using them based on durability. My back, wrists, elbows and shoulders ache and sometimes it looks like I haven't knocked a dent in this painstaking task BUT I know I'm making progress. The results will be stunning once the chosen logos and fittings are in place but driz's last sentence NAILS IT! MUCH easier to maintain than to restore!! Stay the course....she'll be standing tall and turning heads!
                            Dave
                            Restoring/ upgrading: 1990 Ciera Sunbridge 2655 ST, "One Particular Harbour"
                            5.7 Mercruiser Alpha 1 Gen 1 (my floating retirement villa if it doesn't kill me first)
                            Sold:
                            1995 SeaPro 210 C/C "Hydro-Therapy"
                            Mariner 150
                            Towing with:
                            2002 Ford F 350 7.3L Super Duty
                            Near High Rock Lake, N.C.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thank you everyone for your information and help. I want to give you an update on the project. I have not used wet sanding, and so far I have applied rubbing compound, polish and wax on the boat and was able to bring back a reasonable shine. Attached are some photos for your viewing. I have not taken the boat out to see how it looks under the sun, but it shows a decent reflection under the berth cover.

                              As for the non-skid I have used a fiberglass cleaner with PTEF for the area in the cockpit, which is the worst non-skid area on the boat. The cockpit is now clean but can be better. I will try the method suggest by Dave and may be attend the Shurhold Univ (LOL).

                              Joe






                              Attached files

                              1986 2850 Commend Bridge on hydrohoist
                              A260 and AQ280 with DP lower unit

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X