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Wet stringers - Bayliner 4387 - 1990 - repair-gctid813612

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    Wet stringers - Bayliner 4387 - 1990 - repair-gctid813612

    I would like to share some insight into my journey to find a reasonable solution to this problem that most boaters will experience in their boating lifetime. I live in the south suburban Chicago area at the southern tip of Lake Michigan to begin this story. It was 2015 that I was told that the boat "might have wet stringers" after a mechanical service inspection was completed. I was not too concerned at the time, since, I was in the process of listing the boat for sale, not believing this as significant. I did manage to secure a purchase agreement through a local broker in 2016 for a reasonable price and learned after the purchaser surveyor inspected that this was a major problem without question.

    Long story short, the estimate for this work to be completed was in the range of $29K and that number was not firm, it was just an estimate and it could go higher. The additional problem was the two main lower stringers were very bad and the weight of the engines on these stringers were being compressed downward toward the bottom of this boat.

    Believe or not, the answer came through a further discussion with the surveyor who had previously inspected for the sale that went dead; he referred me to a firm in Michigan by the name of DRYBOAT (www.dryboat.com) what had a specialized system for handling of these type of repairs with high success and return to structural soundness. This system really worked and these repairs were accomplished all "outside during April at the marina that I wintered stored all within three weeks from starting............!!!

    The work also included mechanical assistance from the local mechanic to lift the engines for realignment; all this for a firm price of less than half of the original estimate stated above.

    New survey was completed by another independent surveyor stating structural soundness; providing a current market valuation for this boat as to age and condition.

    I hope that this will help anyone else in need since DRYBOAT will provide this service NATIONALLY!!!!

    #2
    So what did dryboat do for $15,000 dollars?
    Esteban
    Huntington Beach, California
    2018 Element 16
    Currently looking for 32xx in South Florida
    Former Bayliners: 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

    Comment


      #3
      "green650" post=813683 wrote:
      So what did dryboat do for $15,000 dollars?
      From what I found online, all they do is suck the moisture out and get the area dry enough to not show up on a moisture meter. It appears that they do not address the root cause or any wood rot.
      1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
      2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
      Anacortes, WA

      Comment


        #4
        "Norton Rider" post=813688 wrote:
        "green650" post=813683 wrote:
        So what did dryboat do for $15,000 dollars?
        From what I found online, all they do is suck the moisture out and get the area dry enough to not show up on a moisture meter. It appears that they do not address the root cause or any wood rot.
        That's scary. It seems an unscrupulous owner looking to sell a boat with wet stringers could use dryboat to mask the issue and the party looking to purchase wouldn't be wiser. Any thoughts on what other things could be looked at that would provide a tip-off that this work had been done?
        Why Naut
        1996 Bayliner 4087
        Twin Cummins 250 HP 6BTA5.9 M2
        Anacortes, WA

        MMSI 338311223

        Comment


          #5
          The whole thing reads more like an ad to me, just sayin..........

          I can see where this could work in some circumstances though I keep seeing it as something akin to Bondo. You know slap it on the old jalopy quickly sand and shoot a dose of cheap paint . Even here in the salt mine it'll last that 3 years before becoming next years knives and forks and won't look atrocious till then.. At most it's a couple hundred bucks and some time. Further, bondo isn't used on any sort of structural or stressed area.

          This process is akin to using bondo on your motor mounts but it's worse in that you can't even see what's really holding things on place. Now add to the fact it costs over half what a REAL permanent fix costs. I don't see the gain here except in one area. Unscrupulous dealers and owners turning a quick buck or unloading a problem. Perhaps there is one area it would be worthwhile, Fixing a problem very early on BEFORE any damage has really occurred. Which scenario do you think you'll see more of? :whistle: A guy once used a term I'd never heard before when he was showing my his new paint job on his very old truck, " it's like pouring perfume on a pig"........

          Comment


            #6
            It just proves that you should get a full survey done on any potential purchase and adjust the offering price accordingly. However it does bother me that this process might indeed be a temporary fix to mask the true problem to get the boat to survey acceptably.
            1990 2755 - sold
            2005 275 - sold (now boatless)

            Comment


              #7
              "New survey was completed by another independent surveyor stating structural soundness;"

              Comment


                #8
                It's an interesting concept. From what I gathered, the process only removes moisture from whatever coring is retaining it. In some ways it looks similar to a dry kiln for lumber. That's all well and fine for moisture, but it doesn't appear to address soft wood, voids or delamination. My take on it is that it might be the right tool for some cases but, like every tool, not universal.
                P/C Pete
                Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                MMSI 367770440

                Comment


                  #9
                  "SARSCOTT" post=814500 wrote:
                  "New survey was completed by another independent surveyor stating structural soundness;"
                  The fact that the core was wet before and is now dry enough to pass a surveyor's moisture and tap test did nothing to address the root cause. Moreover, the wood core may now be damaged permanently.

                  This method almost seems like it hides potential issues.
                  1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                  2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                  Anacortes, WA

                  Comment


                    #10
                    "looks similar to a dry kiln for lumber."

                    And I would bet the tree would have registered very high on a moisture meter when it was a growing and absorbing rain, hence the kiln to dry it before using in the manufacturing process :whistle: ???

                    So what is wrong with drying it out, sealing it, and splashing the vessel....sounds like that would just be completing the cycle?

                    Also agree it is probably not the tool for every circumstance. Then again neither is a crescent wrench

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I can remember quite a few years back when my Dad had a Ford station wagon and he took it out and had it Ziebarted (where they drill small holes and spray some tarry junk in the door panels to keep them from rusting out so quickly) . . . . anyway, they plugged all those holes with yellow popping plugs . . . . so wouldn't Dryboat have to have some way to close off all those holes from draining the water out? I was (probably mistaken) under the impression that they used some sort of resin to impregnate the stringers and such after they had vacuumed out the water . . . . maybe not . . . heck, don't know . . . . :S
                      1998 Avanti 3685 - "Dad's Dream" w 454 Mercs - for sale - Dredge Harbor, NJ
                      Former - "Home Aweigh" 2003 - 2452 Bayliner Cierra Classic Hardtop Cruiser
                      WQQM835 MMSI: 338147209
                      James H. Stradling

                      Comment


                        #12
                        "Dadrock33" post=814805 wrote:
                        I can remember quite a few years back when my Dad had a Ford station wagon and he took it out and had it Ziebarted (where they drill small holes and spray some tarry junk in the door panels to keep them from rusting out so quickly) . . . . anyway, they plugged all those holes with yellow popping plugs . . . . so wouldn't Dryboat have to have some way to close off all those holes from draining the water out? I was (probably mistaken) under the impression that they used some sort of resin to impregnate the stringers and such after they had vacuumed out the water . . . . maybe not . . . heck, don't know . . . . :S
                        Yes that stuff worked. Of course of you sprayed it on an already rusty inner panel it wouldn't help so much. That's all non structural.. this sort of thing is way more important than a rusty fender. It's more akin to undercoating an already rusted out frame. Once the strength is gone it ain't a comin back. It still reminds me of a slap and dash bondo job to shove something out the door.

                        If I was ever going to look into a big boat I'd very well educate myself in how to determine if this has been done. Whatever holes are filled and painted, little marks in that pattern ect. This is definitely something to beware of because I'd bet my socks that no owner dealer or broker is going to tell you it's been done. Take that to the bank.:whistle:

                        Comment


                          #13
                          "Dadrock33" post=814805 wrote:
                          I can remember quite a few years back when my Dad had a Ford station wagon and he took it out and had it Ziebarted (where they drill small holes and spray some tarry junk in the door panels to keep them from rusting out so quickly) . . . . anyway, they plugged all those holes with yellow popping plugs . . . . so wouldn't Dryboat have to have some way to close off all those holes from draining the water out? I was (probably mistaken) under the impression that they used some sort of resin to impregnate the stringers and such after they had vacuumed out the water . . . . maybe not . . . heck, don't know . . . . :S
                          Seems if they have the ability to suck out the moisture and dry out the core they should have the ability to also inject some sort of epoxy resin into the now dry and waiting to absorb some type of liquid core. Perhaps that's another 15k :huh:
                          Dave
                          Edmonds, WA
                          "THE FIX"
                          '93 2556
                          Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

                          The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                          Misc. projects thread
                          https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I read a report form someone who had it done. it took months, but they put heating pads on the hull, drilled holes, then put a hard vacuum to it. It took 90 days or so for all the sections to get done. They then peeled the outer hull glass, repaired the coring and re glassed it. I doubt repairs to stringers would be possible, without doing exactly what we have done. Epoxy will only travel so far before it gels up and goes no farther. And using an UV epoxy, there would be no way to get the light into the coring. So I tend to believe it is a viable option for things like hull and deck coring, but structure, would only be a half step, on dumping it on someone else.
                            1986 Bayliner Contessa 2850
                            In over my head for sure!!
                            M/V SKUA refit
                            https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...ak-gctid499442

                            https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...contessa-refit

                            Comment


                              #15
                              DRIZ...help me understand your statement "Once the strength is gone it ain't a comin back"

                              Is the strength immediately gone every time moisture gets "Back" into wood ....... temporarily?

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