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Any way to remove and fill all the cover snaps?-gctid808932

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    Any way to remove and fill all the cover snaps?-gctid808932

    Curious if anyone has ever done anything of the like. I've always kept my boat tucked high under my canopy, or with a stretchfit cover. Hate the tons of steel snaps all over a clean boat line.

    Yet all the VR5s I can find have the snap in cover option.. Is there a way to remove them and fill them? (though I'd imagine it would be difficult to make look right?) Maybe some kind of white screws to replace? Or am I out of luck for the time/effort?

    #2
    Your snaps are probably installed with pop rivets. You need a drill, drill motor, countersink, a small hammer, a punch or two, a year and color correct gel coat patch putty kit wet/dry sandpaper 320-1000 grit, rubbing compound, polishing compound and patience to remove and fill those. Just drill through the center of the snap and as you get through the top of the rivet the whole thing comes off. If the pulling shaft is still in the rivet you will need a small punch to gently pound it through so you have a hole in the center of the aluminum rivet. Next, using a punch a bit smaller than the rivet shaft, tap the remaining rivet shaft through the hole. Then run the countersink into the hole to create a good bonding surface, fill it (do a bunch at a time), let it kick overnight then start progressive sanding to the 1000 grit you want to bring the filler down to the normal surface and have a smooth transition without sanding into the surrounding gelcoat. Then use the rubbing compound and polishing compound. It labor intensive and checking out some YouTube on the subject is highly recommended. That's one guys way of doing it anyway.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    MMSI 367770440

    Comment


      #3
      "Pcpete" post=808935 wrote:
      Your snaps are probably installed with pop rivets. You need a drill, drill motor, countersink, a small hammer, a punch or two, a year and color correct gel coat patch putty kit wet/dry sandpaper 320-1000 grit, rubbing compound, polishing compound and patience to remove and fill those. Just drill through the center of the snap and as you get through the top of the rivet the whole thing comes off. If the pulling shaft is still in the rivet you will need a small punch to gently pound it through so you have a hole in the center of the aluminum rivet. Next, using a punch a bit smaller than the rivet shaft, tap the remaining rivet shaft through the hole. Then run the countersink into the hole to create a good bonding surface, fill it (do a bunch at a time), let it kick overnight then start progressive sanding to the 1000 grit you want to bring the filler down to the normal surface and have a smooth transition without sanding into the surrounding gelcoat. Then use the rubbing compound and polishing compound. It labor intensive and checking out some YouTube on the subject is highly recommended. That's one guys way of doing it anyway.
      +1

      Just did this in the cockpit of my 2556 (removing carpet snaps) didn't bother with all the color matching and wet sanding/polishing on my project as its all non skid texture and scratched up from 24 years worth of use. Even my "quick project" took a quite a bit of time.
      Dave
      Edmonds, WA
      "THE FIX"
      '93 2556
      Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
      Misc. projects thread
      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

      Comment


        #4
        So basically... there's not an easy solution.. especially with 25+ snaps

        Comment


          #5
          I spend at least an hour researching, doing maintenance work and general scheming for every hour I use my boat right now. However, I'm making the boat "ours" and fixing deferred maintenance. With our last boat I averaged about an evening a week throughout the year. No, there are no shortcuts, but if you enjoy working with your hands it can be very rewarding. Some of it is prospective, 25 places? Piece of cake. Kind of like when I was working. I traveled to Asia a lot. 12 & 14 hour flights. Five hours to Hawaii now? Heck that's just getting started.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          MMSI 367770440

          Comment


            #6
            "Pcpete" post=809354 wrote:
            I spend at least an hour researching, doing maintenance work and general scheming for every hour I use my boat right now.
            +1 on that! Researching helps me develop the courage, and that typically takes longer than actually doing the project. But while I agree there is an excellent sense of accomplishment doing these projects, I often times think I'm waiting for the other shoe to drop. I have no problem with bodywork, plumbing and electrical, but the mechanical, ......I reluctantly leave 90% of that to my mechanic.

            I've actually been pondering removing my snaps too.
            "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
            MMSI: 367637220
            HAM: KE7TTR
            TDI tech diver
            BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
            Kevin

            Comment


              #7
              I usually just fill the holes with 3M marine white sealant.

              When I get enough holes to justifies opening a can of bondo

              I'll pick it out and fill with short strand clear bondo then sand smooth and use a gel coat and some saran wrap to make a smooth finish

              Comment

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