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Help....Just bought a new boat found hole in hull-gctid807142

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    Help....Just bought a new boat found hole in hull-gctid807142

    So I just bought a boat. I was so focused on making sure it was mechanically sound I over looked something big. Once I got the boat home I went over it again, this time crawling under the boat. I found the gel coat and paint to be worn off exposing I guess the bare fiberglass. Also there is a hole I can stick the tip of my finger in. Also on the side I found another crack that had what looked like clear caulk in it. My question is with the hole in the bottom of the hull what's the likely hood of it potentially sinking and is there a cheap fix to plug the hole on the bottom of the boat or did I completely get screwed?

    #2
    What boat do you have and a photo would help.
    David
    http://www.cambridgeadvertising.org
    http://www.davidladewig.com

    Comment


      #3
      Post pics, could it be a cheapo plastic through hull fitting broke off??
      Dave
      Edmonds, WA
      "THE FIX"
      '93 2556
      Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
      Misc. projects thread
      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

      Comment


        #4
        I will get pics asap when it stops raining. It's on the bottom if the boat looks like it's from beaching it or got into some low water....it's not a bayliner but I knew I'd get answers here. When I looked at it there is an apparent hole i could stick my finger in but looks like there is another layer of something on the inside

        Comment


          #5
          Hull integrity is high on the importance scale. This is why a marine survey and a sea trial are so important when purchasing a boat. I first would consider bringing it back if possible -can't believe the previous owner didn't disclose this to you. I would not recommend the "cheap fix" or "chewing gum" approach on fixing a hull - especially if its below the waterline. Good news is that most fiberglass hulls and gel coats can be fixed with a DIY project and fairly low cost. Please indicate the type of boat you purchased and identify specifically on the hull where the damage is located when you send the pics. Take a wide angle pic first and close-up afterwards.

          Comment


            #6
            With a hole it the hull, sinking would be high on the things that can happen.

            Its a little late to advise a survey but you now know why it would be a good idea.

            Not the good. Fiberglass is easy to repair. You need to get some good advise on where you stand and have someone with some fiberglass knowledge do the repair.

            It sounds like it is isolated and should be easy if you can get to the inside hull.

            While easy fiberglass repair does have important steps that must be followed starting with the area being clean and dry. Heavy on the dry.

            Do not attempt a fast repair. Do it right. That starts with removing any caulk to see what you are facing.

            Pictures are needed here.

            Don't panic, just be sure you get proper instructions or help.

            Doug
            Started boating 1955
            Number of boats owned 32
            Bayliners
            2655
            2755
            2850
            3870 presently owned
            Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

            Comment


              #7
              I have done this type of repair a few times.

              When you say worn off...due to what??

              The hole can be repaired. there are a lot of websites that can show you what do in detail, but in essence, you grind a gently sloping circle around the hole, then fill it with multiple plies of fiberglass, then gel coat it and it's good to go.

              I like this series:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9hfpOCnzEs

              I would advocate a P100 mask (HEPA) filter, and a tyvek suit for the grinding. Way more confortable. I use nitrile gloves and socks I don't care about and tape up the joints. all of this prevents the ITCH!!!!

              Chay

              Comment


                #8
                "Gixx3r" post=807151 wrote:
                IWhen I looked at it there is an apparent hole i could stick my finger in but looks like there is another layer of something on the inside
                You can't just fix a hole with an unknown history when it's below the waterline.

                [ul]

                [li]If the boat was ever operated at speed with the hole, that can force water in between the fiberglass layers (as well as between the glass and core material) at high pressure. This can cause the glass layers to delaminate (separate) compromising a large portion of their strength. The longer it was operated with the hole, the worse the delamination can be. We once had to fix a fast ferry where a hairline crack that wasn't spotted after striking a reef led to several square meters of fiberglass delaminating.

                [li]It sounds like you've got a cored hull. That's a sandwich of fiberglass with something else (usually foam or wood) in the middle to build up thickness (which helps make it more rigid). If the boat sat in the water for a while with the hole, you could have water intrusion into the core material, possibly damaging it or separating the core from the glass.

                [/ul]

                So the damage may be much more extensive than just the hole you see. You'll need to figure out for yourself how bad it is, or hire someone to figure it out for you. Then repair the interior damage (if any) before patching the hole. Hopefully it's just a simple hole. But if it's worse, you don't want to fix the hole and ignore a compromised interior structure.
                1994 2556, 350 MAG MPI Horizon, Bravo 2

                Comment


                  #9
                  cfoss, I like that guys videos too, explains things very well.
                  Dave
                  Edmonds, WA
                  "THE FIX"
                  '93 2556
                  Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

                  The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                  Misc. projects thread
                  https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                  Comment


                    #10
                    "Solandri" post=807207 wrote:
                    "Gixx3r" post=807151 wrote:
                    IWhen I looked at it there is an apparent hole i could stick my finger in but looks like there is another layer of something on the inside
                    You can't just fix a hole with an unknown history when it's below the waterline.

                    [ul]

                    [li]If the boat was ever operated at speed with the hole, that can force water in between the fiberglass layers (as well as between the glass and core material) at high pressure. This can cause the glass layers to delaminate (separate) compromising a large portion of their strength. The longer it was operated with the hole, the worse the delamination can be. We once had to fix a fast ferry where a hairline crack that wasn't spotted after striking a reef led to several square meters of fiberglass delaminating.

                    [li]It sounds like you've got a cored hull. That's a sandwich of fiberglass with something else (usually foam or wood) in the middle to build up thickness (which helps make it more rigid). If the boat sat in the water for a while with the hole, you could have water intrusion into the core material, possibly damaging it or separating the core from the glass.

                    [/ul]

                    So the damage may be much more extensive than just the hole you see. You'll need to figure out for yourself how bad it is, or hire someone to figure it out for you. Then repair the interior damage (if any) before patching the hole. Hopefully it's just a simple hole. But if it's worse, you don't want to fix the hole and ignore a compromised interior structure.
                    Think the phrase "Job's comforter" applies here!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Here are a couple pics.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Can't get pics to load

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Email them to me, I can upload for you or see why they won't

                          [email protected]
                          Boatless at this time

                          A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Emailed you the pix

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Stand By Gixx3r

                              I tried too and it failed.

                              I am having admin look into it
                              Boatless at this time

                              A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

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