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A Night to Remember !!-gctid397306

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    docmirror wrote:
    Also have your bilge pumps running when the storm hits in case you do take water, or collect a lot from the rain into the cockpit.
    Bad idea to have the pumps running if there isn't any water present... your pumps will burn out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    It apears that they stayed put okay.

    Both 40'+ and were bouncing around pretty wildly before I lost sight of them. By the time I was returned to anchor visibilty had also returned and they seemed to have stayed intact.

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  • hfxjack
    replied
    Sarah

    How did the other boats in the bay make out?

    Cheers

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Thank you!

    Some good thoughts there - happily I find that I knew some of them! :right

    No,,,,really, I did - altho the 'kellet' is new to me I think I have something in my shed that is just the ticket too!

    Not to be confused with being impressed with my paltry skills, I am pleased that I kept my head and kept my boat unharmed.

    Sometimes you don't have to be perfectly executing everything, but if you keep your head things just work out.

    This was one of those times, I think

    Anyways.......thank you all so much!

    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    captharv wrote:
    More chain is better, however, one must look at the size/power of the anchor reteival device.

    A 13# anchor with 75' of chain is a burden for us guys, but for a couple of 120# ladies, in a tense situation spells disaster.

    I went from a 8# danforth to a 13# one a couple of years ago, after the anchor plowed 15' thru a hard sand bottom during a suprize storm. Being my wife is not exactly a bodybuilder, I stayed with my 6' oif vinyl covered 3/8" chain. This anchor digs in and stays put. When we are at Silver Glen, and theres wind or a threat of wind, I use 2 8# stern anchors.

    last weekend, we were at an island camping outing. The 13# was out 100', and was set using reverse engine. The stern ha a 1/2 nylon line to a substantial tree. The wind gusted to 25. We did not move.

    Buy a Chapmans "seamanship an small boat handling" it is the boaters bible, and discusses anchoring in a lot more detail than I can type......
    Careful with stern anchors......in a quick wind swing or storm they can be a nightmare. Personally I never use them but have been on a boat with high wind to the beam, bow and stern anchor........and we couldn't get the stern anchor up!

    If a boat swings 180 degrees the anchor should re-set.....Quickly! The use of a Kellet is good advice but chain should be at least the length of the boat. 6 feet is from the "old school". The right anchor for the right bottom is important..I wouldn't even get into anchor types.....it has been discussed to death here.

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  • captharv
    replied
    More chain is better, however, one must look at the size/power of the anchor reteival device.

    A 13# anchor with 75' of chain is a burden for us guys, but for a couple of 120# ladies, in a tense situation spells disaster.

    I went from a 8# danforth to a 13# one a couple of years ago, after the anchor plowed 15' thru a hard sand bottom during a suprize storm. Being my wife is not exactly a bodybuilder, I stayed with my 6' oif vinyl covered 3/8" chain. This anchor digs in and stays put. When we are at Silver Glen, and theres wind or a threat of wind, I use 2 8# stern anchors.

    last weekend, we were at an island camping outing. The 13# was out 100', and was set using reverse engine. The stern ha a 1/2 nylon line to a substantial tree. The wind gusted to 25. We did not move.

    Buy a Chapmans "seamanship an small boat handling" it is the boaters bible, and discusses anchoring in a lot more detail than I can type......

    Leave a comment:


  • Stratocaster
    replied
    Hey Sarah, first of all, GREAT job at keeping your head in a stressful situation. Well done!

    A couple of tips, for what it's worth.

    1. When anchoring with two off the bow, make sure they are at an angle of at least 30 degrees to each other. Lay the first one down, then travel sideways to where you're dropping the second one and lay it down. Back down, paying out rode for both. Set them, and forget them. The 2 anchors will be in front of you, with the rodes in a "V" formation. You can keep the rode and chain for the 2nd anchor in a 5 gal pail, stored in the bilge. The reason for the angle is so the boat will swing less and the rodes won't twist together (called "candy caning"). Practice on a calm day with a friend, it's easier than it sounds, if everything is at hand. If the wind changes, you will have to bring in one of the anchors, let the boat swing, then reset the 2nd hook in the new spot.

    2. If using one anchor, when dropping anchor, clip a 12 lb (or heavier) lead cannonball to the chain, right where it joins the rode. Set your anchor. This is called a kellet, and will keep the chain more horizontal on the bottom. Buy the cannonball at any good fishing store. This is a much easier, and I think a more effective method. But it won't do anything about your swinging.

    Old tricks learned from my Grandpa, a commercial fisherman for 65 years, and I was often his deckhand.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    LazyCrusr wrote:
    Aw shucks,,,,,,,Adequate is more the word that I'd use.....

    Anyways, thanks so much for the good words, and ideas too.

    Maybe I'll take that coated chain back & trade for plain jane chain

    Going to sleep on land tonite! First time in 9 nites!

    Last I night me and the dogs spent the night off Savage Island in the 'Inland Sea', what a beauty of a night!

    And I used 2 anchors

    Sarah
    Constant learning is part of boating.....almost 60 years at it and I'm still learning (Only Power S know it all What doesn't kill us makes us stronger and smarter.

    I would suggest using as much chain as you can carry. There is nothing wrong with anchoring all chain and the hold is increased

    substantially. Another small thing is I try to anchor in 10 to 15 feet of water because there are less weeds and silt so you get better hold.

    Having said all that..one night in 6 feet of water with 40 feet of chain down, the wind came up and I plowed about 100 feet of bottom before grabbing again......silt doesn't hold well!

    Boat safe....people safe...you made an excellent recovery!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    CO detector, No,,,,I don't have that.

    But I hope that you get the great weather also,,,,,,,49 nice nights for YOU!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Great job!!

    I would be cautious of running the engine when at anchor since you have a hard top. Especially in a storm, since you don't want to open any windows, raises the risks CO poisoning.

    Do you have a CO detector on the boat?

    9 days on the water I hope we get that kind of time this summer!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Aw shucks,,,,,,,Adequate is more the word that I'd use.....

    Anyways, thanks so much for the good words, and ideas too.

    Maybe I'll take that coated chain back & trade for plain jane chain

    Going to sleep on land tonite! First time in 9 nites!

    Last I night me and the dogs spent the night off Savage Island in the 'Inland Sea', what a beauty of a night!

    And I used 2 anchors

    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • ksanders
    replied
    Sarah

    We've all watched as you have went from being a complete greenhorn to an experienced captain.

    Great job in this emergency!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Great seawomanship, Captain Sarah! Well done...

    Leave a comment:


  • Go Aweigh2452
    replied
    You did an outstanding job Sarah. Better then many on this forum would have done...

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    LazyCrusr wrote:
    Well thanks guys

    They're still talking about it here on TV, the storm did a good job in the area.

    http://www.wptz.com/news/vermont-new...v/-/index.html

    I still find it hard to believe that I didn't end up on shore

    And a good scene for a nightmare would be out in the open lake with that storm pounding away,,,,the waves that would generate I do not care to ever see.

    And I am now working on improving my second anchor; I bought some coated chain for it and will increase the length too.

    Anyway,,,,,the drama queen sails again, today! Weatherman promises no more big storms for 24 hrs.

    Off to explore the 'inland sea' in a cpl hrs.

    Have a wonderful weekend guys!

    Have fun and BE SAFE, whatever you do.

    Sarah, who likes the Lucky Bucket analogy,,,,,,
    Sarah,

    I have heard warnings about using "coated chain" because you cannot see the rust that may be eating your chain.

    The other day, one of the boats at our marina was bow in at the slip with a loose spring line. His pulpit and anchor were hitting the dock and eventually the anchor got caught and broke the chain. From the point of the break, you could see the chain was in very bad shape. The coating looked okay but the chain inside was trashed.

    You would be better off with a good galvinized chain without the coating.

    Al

    Leave a comment:

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