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How many passengers can I put on my boat?-gctid397105

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    #16
    Here is what I believe to be the passanger quantity formula. My 26' boat had a plaque that said 12.

    The formula assumes a person weighs 150lbs. I should also point out the as of last year the new formula from the coast guard assumes a person weighs 185lbs. So i guess they think we are all fat.

    Number of people = vessel length (feet) X vessel width (feet)/15 ---so a 24 ft boat with an 8 foot beam would be (24x8)/15=12.8 people.
    1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
    twin 454's
    MV Mar-Y-Sol
    1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
    Twin chevy 350's inboard
    Ben- Jamin
    spokane Washington

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      #17
      I would say 10, although it could realistically be packed with more. I had 10 on once and was operating. I had to order the 3 people in the cabin to the other side to balance for the paople on the L lounge and it was a little slow getting up, but not too bad other than that. I was on a smaller inland lake with not too much to really risk, but I don't to do it often. It just worked out that I picked a bunch of people up to take to where all my other friends were anchored. I 't want wouldnt want some 6 footers or anything to pop up somehow though. and I thing we have pretty much the same boat

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        #18
        Maximum passenger occupancy is secondary to the total weight of everything plus people. Also, the person occupancy rating is based on NTSB assumption of average person weight 165lbs, we know that not true in many cases. My 242 is rated 10 people, however I would not have more than 6 and only for short duration day trip.

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          #19
          boatworkfl wrote:
          12 passengers weighing 150 lbs each and no gear, pause for thought. No pop, no beer, no food, no ice, no bait, no fishing gear.
          And NO FUEL!

          The "Max. Passenger" calculations are theoretically performed in a calm pool and calculate the amount of weight placed on one side of the boat needed to capsize it. Subtract the weight of one passenger and you have the number. Load it up or overload it and it's just like going to Las Vegas (with more to lose).

          Comment


            #20
            yachtman wrote:
            Here is what I believe to be the passanger quantity formula. My 26' boat had a plaque that said 12.

            The formula assumes a person weighs 150lbs. I should also point out the as of last year the new formula from the coast guard assumes a person weighs 185lbs. So i guess they think we are all fat.

            Number of people = vessel length (feet) X vessel width (feet)/15 ---so a 24 ft boat with an 8 foot beam would be (24x8)/15=12.8 people.
            I've heard this formula before and all I can say is, whoever came up with it had to be on crack. 12 people aboard say a Bay 245??? Where on earth would you put them? And let's not talk about getting on plane!

            Comment


              #21
              see this (posted as a new thread too):

              http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/05/us/new...html?hpt=us_c2

              Comment


                #22
                I don't know how you do it in the USA, but here in Australia it is very clear how many people can be on a boat. The water police are very strict on this and heavy fines are imposed on the skipper if the rules are not obeyed. Here is the calculation we follow:

                Determining your boat's capacity

                ÔÇóAustralian Builder's Plate or manufacturer's plate

                Take the capacity information from the Australian Builder's Plate or the manufacturer's plate if fitted to your boat. If your boat doesn't have one of these plates, you should contact the manufacturer for details.

                From 1 July 2006, all new recreational boats manufactured in Australia will show an Australian Builder's Plate. Capacity labels are not required if your boat has either a manufacturer's plate or an Australian Builder's Plate, but only if these are clearly visible from each steering position on the boat. You should still consider placing a capacity label on your boat if it provides a more visible reminder of the boat's safe capacity.

                ÔÇóCapacity assessment tables

                To calculate a boat's capacity, measure the length and beam (width) and match these dimensions in the tables below. These tables are also shown on the back of each capacity label.

                Powered boats under six metres Length (metres) Recommended maximum number of persons Maximum permissable weight (kilograms)

                Boat length ppl max weight

                up to 3m 2 180

                3m to 3.49m 3 270

                3.5m to 4.49m 4 360

                4.5m to 4.99m 5 450

                5m to 5.49m 6 540

                5.5m to 5.99m 7 630

                Powered boats six metres and over

                Length (metres) Beam (metres)

                6m 2.5m, 3m, 3.5m, 4m, 4.5m, 5m

                People capacity 7, 7, 8 , 9, 9, 10

                7m 8, 9, 9, 10, 11, 11

                8m 9, 10, 11, 12, 12, 13

                9m 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

                10m 11, 12, 14, 15, 15, 16

                11m 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18

                12m 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20

                13m 15 16 18 19 20 21

                14m 16 18 19 21 22 23

                15m 17 19 21 22 23 25

                Powered boats with a flybridge Length

                (metres) Beam (metres)

                Length Beam

                5m 2m 2.5m 3m 3.5m 4m 4.5m 5m

                People capacity 4 4 5 5 6 6 -

                6m 5 5 6 6 7 7 8

                7m 5 6 7 7 8 8 9

                8m 6 7 8 8 9 10 10

                9m 7 8 9 10 10 11 12

                10m 8 9 10 11 12 12 13

                11m - 10 11 13 13 14 14

                12m - 11 12 13 14 15 15

                13m - 12 13 14 15 16 17

                14m - 13 14 15 16 17 18

                15m - 14 15 16 18 19 20

                If your boat is six metres and over or its dimensions are outside those indicated, you can use an assessment process provided in a recognised technical standard such as Australian Standard 1799.1.

                Capacity is assessed at 80 kg per person (with an additional allowance of 10 kg per person for personal gear).

                Children up to one year should not be counted for loading purposes. Children between one and 12 years can be counted as › of an adult.

                Boats with a flybridge

                For boats with a flybridge or upper deck with a second steering control, a capacity label should be placed at each steering position so it can be seen by the operator at all times.

                Only one quarter of the boat's total permitted number of people may be on the flybridge at any one time. For example, if total capacity of the boat is 12 people, a maximum of three people would be allowed on the flybridge at one time.

                When putting capacity labels on a boat with a flybridge, ensure the label on the main deck shows only the main deck capacity and the label on the flybridge shows only the flybridge capacity. For example if the total capacity of the boat is 12, the capacity label should show three on the flybridge section and nine on the main deck section.

                When no one is on the flybridge, the total capacity may be carried on the main deck.
                David
                1999 Bayliner 1750 Capri. 3l Mercruiser Alpha

                2014 Yamaha VX Cruiser

                Comment


                  #23
                  Seaquel wrote:
                  I've heard this formula before and all I can say is, whoever came up with it had to be on crack. 12 people aboard say a Bay 245??? Where on earth would you put them? And let's not talk about getting on plane!
                  We have a 2010 245 and last year we had 4 adults and 3 kids on board. It was tight. And forget about getting on plane any time soon!!

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                    #24
                    245_Tom wrote:
                    We have a 2010 245 and last year we had 4 adults and 3 kids on board. It was tight. And forget about getting on plane any time soon!!
                    And if you were over here, that would be just over the maximum for your boat by law!
                    David
                    1999 Bayliner 1750 Capri. 3l Mercruiser Alpha

                    2014 Yamaha VX Cruiser

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Number of people = vessel length (feet) X vessel width (feet)/15 ---so a 24 ft boat with an 8 foot beam would be (24x8)/15=12.8 people.
                      I've heard this before but question where it came from. According to this formula, my boat (which has a very wide beam) can carry 26 people!

                      Is the formula just one of those myths that has been around for a while, or is it based on some reg?

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Wow, it's clear that there is really no hard rule (except in Australia). And I guess I don't have a capacity plate because I'm a 26 footer.

                        Sounds like it boils down to common sense and based on feedback I shouldn't go over 14 passengers (with PFD's for all of course), and I would only so this to head to a nearby sandbar in calm waters where passengers will be swimming and hanging on the bow, otherwise there would be absolutely no room in the cockpit and everyone would get cabin fever real fast.

                        Thanks for all your input

                        Comment


                          #27
                          love2speed wrote:
                          Wow, it's clear that there is really no hard rule (except in Australia). And I guess I don't have a capacity plate because I'm a 26 footer.

                          Sounds like it boils down to common sense and based on feedback I shouldn't go over 14 passengers (with PFD's for all of course), and I would only so this to head to a nearby sandbar in calm waters where passengers will be swimming and hanging on the bow, otherwise there would be absolutely no room in the cockpit and everyone would get cabin fever real fast.

                          Thanks for all your input
                          With all that has been written where in the world do you come up with 14 people on a 26 footer ?

                          Maybe at the dock but not on the water.

                          Take a look at the Aussie formulas. For your boat size they are showing 9 and that's more than I will take out on my 30 footer.
                          Jim McNeely
                          New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
                          Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
                          Brighton, Michigan USA
                          MMSI # 367393410

                          Comment


                            #28
                            That's a combination of adults and kids on calm water with a sort ride to a sand bar for the day, not for cruising or distance traveling. I was inquiring about the max number passengers and or weight, we all know that less people make it more comfortable.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              I am referring to the maximum number of passengers as well on smooth waters.
                              Jim McNeely
                              New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
                              Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
                              Brighton, Michigan USA
                              MMSI # 367393410

                              Comment


                                #30
                                I'd look at it as a function of how many people can be seated comfortably and safely in the cockpit, not all over each other, and also move around. If the boat looks overpacked, it is. If the boat looks comfortably loaded, it *probably* is.

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