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Battery charging while in boat?-gctid396915

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    Battery charging while in boat?-gctid396915

    Ok, another probably simple question. I do not have an onboard charger yet, but I do have the external clamp on type. My batteries are in the back compartments between the gas tank and along the transom. Do I need to remove my batteries like I have been doing to charge or can I just leave them in there and clamp the clamps on and charge away? My concern is obviously the proximity to the gas tank and fumes ect.... What do you guys think? I have no quams lifting the batteries out of the boat, but its kind of a pain now that it is a very tall boat.

    #2
    There are batteries in each of the rear compartments.



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      #3
      I used to charge mine all the time without removing them. In reality if you have a leak in your tank you should be able to smell it, Plus when it is on the trailer you should have the drain plug out and the fuel vapors will drain out the drain hole. If you notice you do not have a bilge blower on this boat, as inboard/ouitboards do.
      Boatless at this time

      A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

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        #4
        Thanks. Yea, I do not smell any fuel, but was just not sure if it is an ok thing to do as opposed to take them out. I will try to charge them in place, but just leave the doors open. And yup, it is on a trailer in my driveway As soon as funds allow, I am going to get a battery selector switch and an onboard charger so alls I have to do is plug her in!

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          #5
          Sniff for fumes first.

          I hook the clamps to mine to charge them. I plan on adding the pigtails with extensions so it is easier to connect.

          Occassionally, on some batteries I get a little spark when I hook up the leads(charger is unplugged, so I don't know why, static?). That happens on batteries I have in the garage, not while they are in the bilge.

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            #6
            A good way to safely do it is to have cables permanently attached to the battery routed for away (and up) and to a socket. Plug your charger in there. If you connect the leads directly to the battery some capacitor in the charger may be charged up by just connecting which could cause a spark.

            You always have to vent as the battery may out-gas while it is being charged and hydrogen is even more prone to boom than gas vapor.

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              #7
              Hmmm. I have heard that before KJS. I may just pull them. I carry two batteries and rarely go through one. I would rather air on the safe side. I just need an onboard charger permantly hooked up. How is an onboard any different than just hooking up a standard prtable charger?

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                #8
                Resqme49 wrote:
                Hmmm. I have heard that before KJS. I may just pull them. I carry two batteries and rarely go through one. I would rather air on the safe side. I just need an onboard charger permantly hooked up. How is an onboard any different than just hooking up a standard prtable charger?
                It costs about 10 times more.

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                  #9
                  I've got a Chargetek 500, onboard charger, it's waterproof, spark proof, I just pull out the cord and plug it in, to me it's worth the extra cost to just install the leads on the batteries once when I install new batteries, instead of messing with alligator clips every time I take the boat out.

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                    #10
                    Battery cable quick-connectors have been around for years.

                    Sold under the names T-Max, Pico, Warn, and several other brand names.

                    These are Polarity Goof-Proof, and are available in an array of amperage capacities.






                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
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                      #11
                      First of all if the clamp on automotive charger is NOT a 3 stage or smart charger, you may cook the batteries. Don't even think about using one.

                      Second, Marine battery chargers are made to be spark supressant.

                      Third, the marine battery charger automatically compansates for temperature differences.

                      Go out and buy a marine smart charger. Its cheaper than replacing the batteries the auto charger ruins.

                      Now, read my post in the BOC Library:

                      http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...s-and-Charging

                      It will educate you in batteries and charging. I wrote this to answer questins frequently asked about charging.

                      As told to me by a major battery manufacturer, most batteries are ruined by improper charging than anything else, usually, overcharging/

                      When a battery is accepting a charge, the current is going into the battery and creating a chemical process to store electricity.

                      When the charge is complete, and you force current into it beyoung its capacity, the current causes heat. Over time it will cause sulfation, and/or warped plates. Certainly will reduce the life of it.

                      Not a personal attack. We get this question frequently
                      Captharv 2001 2452
                      "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

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                        #12
                        2850Bounty wrote:
                        Battery cable quick-connectors have been around for years.

                        Sold under the names T-Max, Pico, Warn, and several other brand names.

                        These are Polarity Goof-Proof, and are available in an array of amperage capacities.
                        Yep, and if you buy them under their real names: Anderson Power Pole or AMP (forgot the number) they cost a fraction.......

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                          #13
                          I have a marine/RV charger with 3 different amp banks and you can also select the type of battery.

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