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    s/s ladder-gctid800931

    I'm in N. Vancouver B.C. and I need someone to make some changes to the 3870 ladder to the bridge. I'm having trouble locating some one to do it. Any help would be appreciated.

    1tugger
    1984 3870 with Mitsubishi's
    located in Deep Cove, North Vancouver, B.C.
    Retired Tugboat operator
    Past Commodore Burrard Yacht Club
    Member Deep Cove Yacht Club

    #2
    Tugger, I'm almost done with reworking my 3818 ladder. The new treads are in the shop being varnished. I'm going to pm you with my email so we can have a longer conversation. The pm's have a limited number of characters used.

    My. 3818 has a double rail ladder meaning the tread mounts are connected to two rails and the hand rail is separate. I have seen single rail ladders and some of this may apply.

    The first challenge is getting the set screws and sheet metal screws out of the rail connectors for the hand rail and stiffeners. Disconnect the flybridge hand rail, the ladder hand rail at the upper mounts, the side supports as the ladder passes through the flybridge deck slot and the handrails at the bottom.




    Move the upper mount forward using the old forward holes as the aft holes in the fitting




    I laid the grid down to get at some of the fittings and do some fitting of doublers and extended tube sections




    Here's the rough installation as it is now.




    Then I added a removable step so I can open the port hatch




    I used about 15 feet of 7/8 tube and 5' of 3/4 tube for doublers. I bent the tube with a harbor freight 20 ton tube bender that I used along with my very old workmate bench. The tubing cutter I used was the cheap larger sized one from Home Depot. You have to be patient cutting stainless and not apply too much pressure to the cutter or it will knock out the bearings. You will need a burr tool to remove the seam inside the 7/8 tube to enable the doublers to slide in. Then there will be the normal drill bits, buy good ones and lots of them because the the screws being drilled out are really hard on them.

    The pitch of the ladder went from 88 degrees to 67 degrees, about the same as a step ladder and the stairs on a bunch of the newer boats. The treads are being replaced with 7 1/4 inch ipe, similar to ironwood and less likely to split under pressure like unsupported teak.

    The only mounting points that moved are the side supports at the flybridge deck, about 5" forward and the two handrail mounts I mentioned before. I reused much of the tubing I cut off or sections removed. I'm not happy with the removable step and am going to remake it. I probably have about 40 hours in direct labor and about the same running around gathering stuff.

    If you find someone that is willing to copy what I did, I'm open to an onboard show and tell. The boat is in Everett, WA, so reasonably close to you.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    MMSI 367770440

    Comment


      #3
      Really nice job, Pete.

      Comment


        #4
        p/cpete

        Thank you for the information, and I'm going to try to duplicate what your doing. As it is now I can hardly climb up to the Bridge.

        My email address is "[email protected]"

        1tugger

        By the way, I'm trying to get Mitsubishi owners together to pool information for parts, I'll send you a copy when I get your email address, just for interest.
        1984 3870 with Mitsubishi's
        located in Deep Cove, North Vancouver, B.C.
        Retired Tugboat operator
        Past Commodore Burrard Yacht Club
        Member Deep Cove Yacht Club

        Comment


          #5
          How do you open your floor hatches now?

          Also, being a stainless steel fabricator myself, for cutting the tube, just buy a small cordless mini grinder and some Zippy Disc. Cuts thru that tube like butter.

          Also handy to have one of these on the boat. It will cut thru anchor chain or any lock or cable in seconds.

          For drilling SS, use a high quality drill bits. Always center punch so the bit doesn't wander all over the place. Start with a 1/8" diameter bit. Use cutting oil or paste and go slow. If the bit starts to burn, you will harden the stainless and you won't be able to drill if after that. To deburr the SS tube, cut all of the tube first. Then put a 120 grit disc on your grinder and clamp it in your Work Mate with the disc facing up. Turn on the grinder and then you can roll the ends of the tube over the disc.

          Wear goggles and watch out when you are cutting or deburring as the sparks will melt into your gel coat. I tape some carboard up around the work area.

          One other SS tip that I've told people on this forum before. Have dedicated drill bits for Stainless Steel and another set for everything else. If you drill mild steel and then use the same bit to drill stainless steel, you will impregnate the stainless steel with iron and it will appear to be rusting afterwards. Especially in a salt air. Same goes for wire brushes. Buy a wire brush with stainless steel wire and keep it just for stainless

          And never, ever use steel wool on your stainless steel. Use Scotchbrite pads.

          Hope this helps.

          JV


          Comment


            #6
            In those pictures it shows the removable bottom step over the Genset hatch. I fixed that and changed the feet to rubber feet like on a cane. To get into the port laz, I pull two pins that hold the bottom step in place and open the hatch. My hatches only go up to about 45 degrees with the assist tubes.

            I like your idea of the cutter on board.
            P/C Pete
            Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
            1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
            Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
            MMSI 367770440

            Comment

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