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1986 2556 Bayliner Flybridge-gctid396653

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    1986 2556 Bayliner Flybridge-gctid396653

    I need some help on a bayliner model. My friend is looking to buy a bayliner and we are trying to figure out if the owner is giving us the correct info or not. The owner is calling it a Trophy, but, I have only seen this boat as a cierra. What do you think? This is a 1986 model.

    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...ch&um=1&itbs=1

    #2
    They were named both Trophy and Cierra. I believe the later models were called the Cierra Mine is an 88 and it has Trophy on the side. Also, mine must have been built during the transition because half the documentation says 2560 and the other 2556.I looked at the CL boat. The boats I'm familiar with had the OMC Cobra in them. The Volvo should be better if it's been cared for.You don't have a lower helm. This might seem distressing at first, but in practice, we never used the lower helm. Frankly, it adds a lot of complexity to the boat.Check the cabin back. The white panels typically rot out.CHeck the stringers for rot.... The fuel tank for leaks. (hard to do)The fly-bridge can get leaks and rot out. Check carefully for soft spots.This is a very heavy boat. The trailer needs to be in first class shape. The tow vehicle needs to be stout. I tow with no water, fuel and heavy items on board to ease the load on the trailer. The boat looks like an apartment going down the freeway.When at anchor, the 2556 is quite stable as compared to the 2452. This is due to the weight and 9 1/2' width.Be careful tearing across flat water. If the large wake (from a ferry) comes up on your rear 1/4, you'll get whip sawed around. If you're not careful, you could get tossed off the boat. A lanyard kill switch is critical.I've crash through some heavy seas at moderate speeds and thought the hull did very well.You want to be careful pulling up to a dock with the wind at your back. The square cabin back can drive you forward pretty hard. I come in bow to the wind pretty quickly, pull up next to the strongest dock cleat I can see, then race to tie off the bow line before the boat takes off. (and it will)We find that we sleep better back in the "Cave' under the dinette. We use the V berth up front for storage. This works much better than sleeping up front.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/700341=29347-Alameda Clipper cove 04 2007 027.jpg[/img]

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      #3
      This boat saw three designation changes: It started out as a 2556 Trophy. As Monterey alluded to, midway through 1988 they switched to 2560 Trophy. And then in 1989, it became a 2560 Ciera.

      It is all the same boat with no major changes, aside from Volvo (1986 only) to OMC (1987 to 1989) to Mercruiser (1990 - 1994).

      This one appears to be an early production model with the optional dual station removed.
      Matt Train
      BOC Site Team
      Chicagoland, IL

      Comment


        #4
        Having owned a couple Ciera's and a Trophy of this vintage, the info (e.g. it being advertised as a Trophy) appears to be correct. There were certainly many commonalities (including the hull in some cases) between the two sub-models from Bayliner. I have always seen those mid 1980's 255x boats labeled as a Trophy, and Trophys of that vintage typically have that blue hull (which I am very fond of). I currently own a 2450 Ciera Command bridge, and it is basically the little brother to the 2556 Trophy Command Bridge (even though one is a Ciera and one is a Trophy). Besides the command bridge, the Trophy also came as a hard top (non flybridge) or an open cockpit version.

        I would be more concerned about things like why a bilge pump is dangling in an unusable spot, and I'd be moving that battery switch out of the engine bay (which itself seems to be a bit dirty). Just make sure to have it inspected well if you are not comfortable looking things over yourself. We've certainly seen some very badly done "rigging" jobs as of lately, but not everything is always noticeable or obvious to being a problem. I'd also be asking the owner if and when the last time the PDS bearings were replaced (Primary Drive Shaft). They say it's a one owner boat, so they should know. If it's never been done, it would be a further negotiation point below their "firm" price. In general, getting any maintenance history is great. My personal preference would be having one of these boats WITH the Volvo Penta stern drive as shown (easy to work on and maintain).

        Comment


          #5
          I like the idea of not having the lower helm station.
          Phil, Vicky, Ashleigh & Sydney
          1998 3055 Ciera
          (yes, a 1998)
          Previous boat: 1993 3055
          Dream boat: 70' Azimut or Astondoa 72
          Sea Doo XP
          Sea Doo GTI SE
          Life is short. Boats are cool.
          The family that plays together stays together.
          Vice Commodore: Bellevue Yacht Club

          Comment


            #6
            For a smaller SDN F/B boat, these are very nice.

            I've installed several DP's on this model, and it made quite an improvement.
            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

            Comment


              #7
              You guys gave me some good info to pass on. I am trying to convince him to come to the BOC. There are the best people in the world here and the best people own Bayliners.

              Thanks:worth

              Comment


                #8
                itsabowtime2 wrote:
                I like the idea of not having the lower helm station.
                I agree. It was an afterthought anyway, and I always felt you were too forward, and too low to reasonably pilot the boat (especially on plane).
                Matt Train
                BOC Site Team
                Chicagoland, IL

                Comment


                  #9
                  Download_Complete wrote:
                  I agree. It was an afterthought anyway, and I always felt you were too forward, and too low to reasonably pilot the boat (especially on plane).
                  Lower helm is why I love command bridges though, get stuck out in a storm or something and you can continue to navigate from the lower helm

                  Comment


                    #10
                    2.4 mpg for that boat at cruise? Not sure I buy that...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      But the visibility from the lower helm on a 2556 is pretty amazing. 340 degrees of view, can see the horizon, even on hole-shot (with the 7.4, anyways)

                      Unless it is hot, I almost always drive from down below. I dock, depart, navigate tricky water, etc. from the upper. When it is nice, there isn't anywhere better, but in the PNW, the lower helm is desirable, and not a downside, at all. Docking might even be easier from below, as you can see the dockline easier on both sides.
                      Tally and Vicki
                      "Wickus" Meridian 341
                      MMSI 338014939

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Download_Complete wrote:
                        I agree. It was an afterthought anyway, and I always felt you were too forward, and too low to reasonably pilot the boat (especially on plane).
                        There is no such thing as too far forward for the helm unless you are out jumping wakes, visibility improves the further forward you go and in a boat this size keeping people (weight) forward is a good thing.

                        I ran my contessa from lower station almost exclusively - one season the only reason bridge cover came off was to get to stuff stowed up there.
                        1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
                        1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
                        Nobody gets out alive.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Personally, I prefer dual stations. The upper is great for good weather and best visibility, but the lower station is best for bad weather and rough water, especially for people that aren't good with rough water. And at least on my 2450, I'm just about standing on the hull anyway, and the lower station barely takes up any space. The seat folds down out of the way, and in its place is more counter top. And as previously mentioned, visibility is actually very good (just remember to keep the curtains open while under way). About the only blind spot for me is the head because it's walled off. At some point I plan on adding a rear view mirror or side mirror (e.g. car door mirror). The flybridge also had a weight limit. Downstairs, you can typically "visit" with more people. Either way, it's just nice to have the choice. Short of buying a bigger boat, adding a second story is a great way to add square footage.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Question: Will this 1986 2556 Bayliner Flybridge not have a lower helm station?

                            If memory serves me, of the several that I have worked on, I've seen them both ways.

                            Tally, it sounds as though your 2556 does!

                            .
                            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Logically, you are safer using the lower helm. Another overlooked advantage was revealed to my friend. He was maneuvering from the flybridge when the upper shift failed. Paniked, he held up the broken shifter and wailed at his wife "Help!". The business like wife called up to him blandly, "So, go to the lower helm" "Oh" and he scurried down below.

                              Just a note. My friend got his wife into yachting. A year or two later and she's turned out to be the strong, agile, skilled, clear headed captain.

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