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  • cwiert
    replied
    Just a follow up. All I needed to do was to tighten up the friction clutch. I tightened it up maybe a quarter of a turn and now the anchor stays put. Simple fix. I also added a large caribeaner that I can attach to the chain and it can hook on to my center cleat on the bow. That way, if the windless ever does fail, the caribeaner will not allow it to fall.

    Thanks again for all the help.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I have never used an anchor pin or tie off to secure my anchor! Never been necessary. I wish it were. Even when I release the tension on the windlass I have to go up therre and kick it free. An inconvenience when you are by yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • cwiert
    replied
    Awesome. Lots of good info here. Thanks everyone for the tips, pics, links and advice! I appreciate it.

    -john

    Leave a comment:


  • mrbigsea
    replied
    Go to www.animatedknots.com We use this website alot for our safe boating class. There is a knot for every use and also shows you how to splice into the chain or for that matter make your own loops for your boat lines.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    ronlord wrote:
    We just use a quarter inch line through the chain then tied off on the port and starboard cleats to secure the anchor. Simple, but it works and won't cost you anything.
    this is the same thing I do, I have a 25" of 1/4 braid tied to the chain and then have a small designated cleat for quick tie off/release in front of the windlass...works like a charm

    I have the same anchor with an above deck lewmar, found the windlass was slipping too easily, tightened clutch and all is good

    Leave a comment:


  • JimMc
    replied
    There are plenty of instructional site to show you how to do the splice. Once you know how you can make your dock line eyes also.

    A short piece of line from the anchor to a cleat will make the anchor safe.

    I agree with tightening up the windlass clutch.

    If the chain was slipping it would be obvious.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pacrimrat
    replied
    +1 on some kind of security for the anchor. I use a carbineer attached to a ›" line and tie it off to the cleat on top on my winch.

    Before you go out and buy new chain you should check the gypsy to see what it calls for. It should be stamped on it.

    The 45's and 47's came with 5/16" chain. Mine has 3/8" put on by the PO.

    Is your winch installation is aftermarket?

    I think 3/8" is overkill for the weight of your boat.

    Attaching the rode to the chain isn't hard. I've done it a few times.

    I have instructions for doing it that are easy to follow.

    I'm about to get on a plane right now so I'll post it later.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I have the Lewmar 700 pro series windlass; I use a lock on the highways when trailering. I use a rubber bungee around the anchor and pulpit when on water; this keeps the anchor from bouncing around and an unwanted release. I have my windlass clutch tightened in as much as possible for my chain and my windlass doesn't seem to loosen ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    ronlord wrote:
    We just use a quarter inch line through the chain then tied off on the port and starboard cleats to secure the anchor. Simple, but it works and won't cost you anything.
    I had my anchor break free - got REAL lucky it went straight down and I threw the boat into N at the same time it happened.

    Ever since then, I have a cleat right on the bow right next to the anchor line - I "figure 8 and invert" the chain on the cleat. That line ain't coming free for nothing!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    The best advice on this thread is securing the anchor with a lanyard. Short piece of line, carbine hook or similar device and viola! No more worries.

    If the winch and anchor rode function correctly presently, why fix it if it ain't broke?

    Leave a comment:


  • yachtman
    replied
    cwiert wrote:
    Good to know. I will have to get new chain and do that.Yup... that's what it looks like. I will try tightening it up, but it's probably the chain.Gotcha. Thanks.So it looks like I have a few things to add to my to do list.1. Get new chain.2. Have WM splice new chain to existing rode3. Snug up friction clutch4. Get an anchor lock.And until I get that done, I'm not going anywhere without securing that anchor one way or another...even as a temp fix. Those horror stories are SCARY!!!Thanks fellas.john
    Good choice. Here is a different type of lock. Neyter but more expensive. You will be able to find various styles.

    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/..._med.jpg[/img]Here is what the set up might look like.

    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/...5374.jpg[/img]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    We just use a quarter inch line through the chain then tied off on the port and starboard cleats to secure the anchor. Simple, but it works and won't cost you anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • cwiert
    replied
    Brad 3055 wrote:
    I got my chain and rode at WM, they have a mobile guy (non wm) that comes in and braids it once a week. Took about 15 minutes, beautiful work. $20. We have the same windlass, I went with 5/8. That anchor is fantastic!
    Good to know. I will have to get new chain and do that.
    whiskywizard wrote:
    Looking through Lewmar's site, it seems the Concept line is vertical.

    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/...6028.jpg[/img] Are you sure yours is horizontal? I might have the wrong unit.If I'm right, there's a bi-square hole on top of the gypsy drum. It is the drive hole for a winch handle that allows you to manually retrieve the rode if the windlass were to fail. If you give that a part-turn clockwise, you'll snug up the friction clutch. Conversely, you'd turn that top nut counter-clockwise to manually lower the anchor. When you do this, you're not cranking the anchor down; you're releasing the drive clutch and allowing the unit to free-wheel.As for anchor security devices, there's a number of ways. Factory units are usually either a pin throught the anchor and roller/guide plates, or a short length of aircraft cable with a snap-lock carabiner on it. An easy way is to splice a short length of nylon rope to a chain hook, and run that nylon back to a deck cleat.
    Yup... that's what it looks like. I will try tightening it up, but it's probably the chain.
    yachtman wrote:
    An anchor lock looks like this and costs about $30

    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/...7134.jpg[/img]
    Gotcha. Thanks.So it looks like I have a few things to add to my to do list.1. Get new chain.2. Have WM splice new chain to existing rode3. Snug up friction clutch4. Get an anchor lock.And until I get that done, I'm not going anywhere without securing that anchor one way or another...even as a temp fix. Those horror stories are SCARY!!!Thanks fellas.john

    Leave a comment:


  • yachtman
    replied
    An anchor lock looks like this and costs about $30

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696369=28935-9397134.jpg[/img]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    cwiert wrote:
    No. How do you do that?
    Looking through Lewmar's site, it seems the Concept line is vertical.

    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/...6028.jpg[/img] Are you sure yours is horizontal? I might have the wrong unit.If I'm right, there's a bi-square hole on top of the gypsy drum. It is the drive hole for a winch handle that allows you to manually retrieve the rode if the windlass were to fail. If you give that a part-turn clockwise, you'll snug up the friction clutch. Conversely, you'd turn that top nut counter-clockwise to manually lower the anchor. When you do this, you're not cranking the anchor down; you're releasing the drive clutch and allowing the unit to free-wheel.As for anchor security devices, there's a number of ways. Factory units are usually either a pin throught the anchor and roller/guide plates, or a short length of aircraft cable with a snap-lock carabiner on it. An easy way is to splice a short length of nylon rope to a chain hook, and run that nylon back to a deck cleat.

    Leave a comment:

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