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Any of you boat with your cat?-gctid391544

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    Any of you boat with your cat?-gctid391544

    We took the 12 year old cat for a car ride. She was pretty cool with the whole thing. Made us think about bringing the ol' girl with us boating.

    Thought from those of you that do?
    Tally and Vicki
    "Wickus" Meridian 341
    MMSI 338014939

    #2
    We take our cat with us:

    It was our first summer together on the boat and I had some serious doubts about how Astrid would take to life on the water. We resolved to be vigilant and keep her inside the cabin. Not a problem. Poor Astrid was so intimidated by the boating lifestyle that she stayed inside the cabin 24/7. We relaxed.

    But Astrid became curious about life outside. One day as we were anchored in the beautiful cove at Patos Island I looked out the pilothouse window there was Astrid outside staring back at me. Hmm, I thought, this could get interesting. Little did I know. Later that evening as we were relaxing in the cockpit, we heard a splash. My wife said, "That was Astrid."

    I heard some thrashing in the water on the port side of the boat by the swim step. I moved out to take a look and sure enough, Astrid was fighting for her life, thrashing underneath the swim step. I clutched her tail and dragged her out from under the step with my right hand and then extended down again and grabbed her by the scruff of the neck and pulled her from the water.

    Still on my knees in my attempt to get to my feet, I moved my left hand within striking distance of poor Astrid, who was experiencing her own version of shock and awe. She reached out with her front paws and sunk her claws into my left arm, pulled it toward her mouth and bit into my left wrist, sinking her fangs deep into my flesh. OUCH!!!!

    Somehow I got to my feet, made my way into the cockpit, and asked my wife for some help. She looked at my predicament and asked in all sincerity, "Doesn't that hurt?" She can be so perceptive at times. But slowly she was able to remove Astrid's paws from my arm, one claw at a time.

    After the claws were detached and the cat had all four feet on the deck, she released my wrist with her fangs and scurried into the cabin none the worse for wear. We washed out the holes in my arm and wrist as best we could with sea water and antiseptic, wrapped the wrist and hoped I might be spared the scourge of cat scratch fever and infection.

    Not to be: that afternoon I developed a high fever, and my wrist swelled considerably and felt as if it were on fire. We made a run to the clinic on Friday Harbor, where the doctor gave me a shot of antibiotics and some very large pills. Cat bites can be very serious, he said. It took a few days, but the wrist made a full recovery. And Astrid? She became a wily old seafaring salt.

    Sruff we learned about boats and cats:
    • Keep the kitty litter box in the cockpit, much easier to keep the boat clean.
    • Keep an eye on your cat especially if they don't understand what going overboard is all about. Astrid gets it now.
    • Cats don't like life vests like dogs, Astrid dumped hers in under 5 seconds.
    • Some people drag large diameter ropes from the stern and teach their cats how to climb back on board, Astrid is what we call in education a "reluctant learner" when it comes to getting in the water, she had none of that!




    Have fun with your cat on board Tally, it can be a real hoot.

    Comment


      #3
      2859er wrote:
      We take our cat with us:

      It was our first summer together on the boat and I had some serious doubts about how Astrid would take to life on the water. We resolved to be vigilant and keep her inside the cabin. Not a problem. Poor Astrid was so intimidated by the boating lifestyle that she stayed inside the cabin 24/7. We relaxed.

      But Astrid became curious about life outside. One day as we were anchored in the beautiful cove at Patos Island I looked out the pilothouse window there was Astrid outside staring back at me. Hmm, I thought, this could get interesting. Little did I know. Later that evening as we were relaxing in the cockpit, we heard a splash. My wife said, "That was Astrid."

      I heard some thrashing in the water on the port side of the boat by the swim step. I moved out to take a look and sure enough, Astrid was fighting for her life, thrashing underneath the swim step. I clutched her tail and dragged her out from under the step with my right hand and then extended down again and grabbed her by the scruff of the neck and pulled her from the water.

      Still on my knees in my attempt to get to my feet, I moved my left hand within striking distance of poor Astrid, who was experiencing her own version of shock and awe. She reached out with her front paws and sunk her claws into my left arm, pulled it toward her mouth and bit into my left wrist, sinking her fangs deep into my flesh. OUCH!!!!

      Somehow I got to my feet, made my way into the cockpit, and asked my wife for some help. She looked at my predicament and asked in all sincerity, "Doesn't that hurt?" She can be so perceptive at times. But slowly she was able to remove Astrid's paws from my arm, one claw at a time.

      After the claws were detached and the cat had all four feet on the deck, she released my wrist with her fangs and scurried into the cabin none the worse for wear. We washed out the holes in my arm and wrist as best we could with sea water and antiseptic, wrapped the wrist and hoped I might be spared the scourge of cat scratch fever and infection.

      Not to be: that afternoon I developed a high fever, and my wrist swelled considerably and felt as if it were on fire. We made a run to the clinic on Friday Harbor, where the doctor gave me a shot of antibiotics and some very large pills. Cat bites can be very serious, he said. It took a few days, but the wrist made a full recovery. And Astrid? She became a wily old seafaring salt.

      Sruff we learned about boats and cats:
      • Keep the kitty litter box in the cockpit, much easier to keep the boat clean.
      • Keep an eye on your cat especially if they don't understand what going overboard is all about. Astrid gets it now.
      • Cats don't like life vests like dogs, Astrid dumped hers in under 5 seconds.
      • Some people drag large diameter ropes from the stern and teach their cats how to climb back on board, Astrid is what we call in education a "reluctant learner" when it comes to getting in the water, she had none of that!




      Have fun with your cat on board Tally, it can be a real hoot.
      Yeah, sounds like a blast!:right.

      You must REALLY love your cat. Personally, if it were me, that cat would be no more. Or at least never be invited on the boat again!

      Comment


        #4
        Check this out,Its cute.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPHuJvs8aws

        My mother took our siamese and us kids through a drive through car wash many years ago and our cat Tiki just lost it! when those squiggly towels contacted the windshield she turned the inside of the car to a blender around and around at lightning speed she went off my head many many times LOL.

        We couldn't bale out and the cat was totally inconsolable we all got a little scratched up the cat was the only one uninjured she lived to 25years and would only eat solid white albicore tuna.She was one spoiled cat. They can be a little unpredictable.

        .

        Comment


          #5
          Cats have a long history at sea and adapt very well. Taking an old cat for the first time might be stressful though. Mine started young and learned very quickly how to climb aboard by the carpet we kept over the side.:arr

          Comment


            #6
            keep a fishing net handy for when they fall overboard.

            Comment


              #7
              We take our cat, Mojo, on the boat. He tends to hide behind the settee when the engines start up. He likes to be on the boat at the dock. He just stares out the window. We started him at an early age in the car, and graduated to the boat. He hasn't jumped over yet, but we're watching him!

              Glen
              Glen Sherwood
              1987 3270 twin 305’s
              Coupeville, WA

              Comment


                #8
                I love cats! Taste like chicken!!
                Simo
                2002 2855 350MPI Bravo III on Lake Champlain -> SOLD!
                Downsized to a couple of kayaks for now.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Unless you have mice on the boat, what the hell would you want a cat on there for? :arr

                  Actually, the mice probably smell better...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Three cats, big, fat, and small (not their real names but they don't object to be called that, I think). They do accompany us at times. They are great kid magnets. Unfortunately "my" head on our 38xx has been taken over by the litter box (only one with enough room is midship). I love cleaning the hair, emptying the litter box, picking up the spilled food from the food dish, being crawled on at 3:00 a.m. Well, maybe love is too strong. However, if the Admiral isn't happy nobody is happy.

                    They are kind of loveable, besides hairballs are a cleaning challenge and since they are allowed the run of everything with little grousing from me I get to sleep in the master suite - priceless.

                    Richard learning to meow

                    Comment


                      #11
                      ishiboo wrote:
                      Unless you have mice on the boat, what the hell would you want a cat on there for? :arr

                      Actually, the mice probably smell better...
                      For the same resons any pet owner wants to keep their pets on board. Come on now, don't be a hater.

                      Comment

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