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Considering Boating: Bayliner Discovery 266 Questions-gctid391487

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    Considering Boating: Bayliner Discovery 266 Questions-gctid391487

    Hi,

    My family is considering buying a boat probably the Bayliner 266 Discovery as this seems to fit our needs. I do have a couple of questions and I was thinking that this forum would make my decisions more informed:


    1. Trailer -- What kind of vehicle do you recommend to tow this boat. I already have a 2005 Toyota Sienna AWD. Reading the spec of the Sienna, it looks like this boat is too big for the van.
    2. Storage Costs -- Due to community laws, I cannot store this boat at home. I leave here in Connecticut, does anybody have some idea of what are the costs involved in storing this boat say in a Marina. If I store the boat in a Marina, does it make sense to buy the trailer?
    3. Sea Worthy -- I plan on cruising from Long Island sound to Cape Cod to Maine. Would this boat be able to handle that? -- with a few stops in between of course. Specs says boat range is 175 miles.
    4. Buy Used or New -- Should I just buy used or new given that this would be my first boat?




    Thanks in advance.

    #2
    I dont have any experience with that boat but I always did like the looks and function of it. As for towing, I would say that van (any van) is not a good choice to tow that size boat, especially the awd format. It might be cheaper to marina it than to buy a tow vehicle if you don't otherwise need one.

    Good luck in your quest.:wel-

    Comment


      #3
      The 266 with trailer is 8400lbs. My boat is around 7000 and my 2011 F150 doesn't like to pull it up hills but it will at 9mpg.

      Storage costs here in Colorado would be around $50 a month for dry storage.

      I would keep it in a Marina but that's me. If you have help with driving the trailer and pulling the boat onto it ect.. You may want to do dry storage, if not, keep it in the marina. My wife hates to drive the boat so I had to do everything.

      As far as the sea worthy question I'll leave that to the experts, I'm in a lake.

      Boats are like cars their value depreciates once you leave the lot. I don't know your financial situation so it's up to you but you can look on the Internet and get one a few years older for a lot less.

      Trailer is also up to you. If you plan to take it to other areas around the country I'd get one. If you keep it in the marina and never take it out of the water, no.

      Welcome to the boating world! I'm sure others will chime in here they are very helpful here.

      Comment


        #4
        Running short on time, so will keep answers short for now[*] Trailer -- What kind of vehicle do you recommend to tow this boat. I already have a 2005 Toyota Sienna AWD. Reading the spec of the Sienna, it looks like this boat is too big for the van. You need to get the specs of the boat, the trailer and capacity of the tow vehicle, and whatever number you get, add about 1000 lbs to it by the time you add gas, water, gear, etc.[*]Storage Costs -- Due to community laws, I cannot store this boat at home. I leave here in Connecticut, does anybody have some idea of what are the costs involved in storing this boat say in a Marina. If I store the boat in a Marina, does it make sense to buy the trailer? This depends on where you plan to use the boat. If you "never" plan to launch anywhere else, skip the trailer. But this also depends on your financial situation - do you have about $500/month to spend for a slip? Some storage/marinas will provide $/foot on their web site, so you can get a good idea before you buy what your monthly storage costs will be for marina slip, dry dock, or storage yard[*]Sea Worthy -- I plan on cruising from Long Island sound to Cape Cod to Maine. Would this boat be able to handle that? -- with a few stops in between of course. Specs says boat range is 175 miles. Don't know enough to answer - but this is also your comfort level/experience - guessing you'd hug the coast?[*]Buy Used or New -- Should I just buy used or new given that this would be my first boat?[*] This is a good question - no previous boating experience for some may be intimidating for a 266 as first boat - but still small enough to handle first time out - the real question is - are you sure it's the right fit AFTER you buy it? See if there are local charter/rental options and take a similar boat out for a few times - this is one scenario where buying new isn't better if you find out later you don't like it. Buy used at a reasonable rate, you don't like it, trade up/down and not lose too much $$$

        Comment


          #5
          Here are my recommendations for your situation:

          1. Buy used. Hire a broker to do your intitial legwork and recommend the best used boats in that class on the market in your area. You have no background so let a professional help you avoid rookie mistakes. It will be money well spent and will no doubt save you many thousands of dollars in the long run.

          Follow the advice of your broker and be prepared for serious negotiations, surveys and inspections. Your broker works for you and, if ethical (which I've found almost all are), will steer you clear of many mine fields and pitfalls just waiting for the unwary. Do not try to cut corners or assume you know stuff because you're handy with a wrench. Boats are tricky business.

          2. A 26 footer is fine for your first boat - it's not a battleship and you'll soon begin to wonder why you didn't go bigger.

          3. Take some classes in boat handling, rules of the road and navigation. Put off your desire for ocean voyaging until you're solidly familiar with boat handling skills and basic navigation. The ocean is big and unforgiving. If you're not comfortable out there the stress will sour you and your family on the whole deal.

          4. Trailer vs marina: Discuss this issue with your broker - you can get good advice pertinent to your area regarding costs, equipment availability, etc.

          You're at the doorstep of a wonderful world, do it right and you'll have few regrets, save a ton of money and open new horizons for you and your family.

          Comment


            #6
            Welcome to the BOC! And welcome to boating as well. I've boating for almost 50 years, I currently own two boats, my 15th and 16th. I tell you this so you understand that there is no perfect boat, and your needs and tastes will surely change over time. But your first choice is a good one, Bayliners IMO are the best value boat there is.

            The 266 (formerly 246) is a solid boat that should be plenty seaworthy for your area. If you're certain you and your family will stay with this new lifestyle for a few years, I would buy new, or slightly used, with warranty. Hopefully you have a dealer you know and trust, or are referred to one by a friend. A good dealer can be very helpful to a new boater, and I think having a warranty is crucial.

            Finally, as already mentioned, TAKE A BOAT SAFETY COURSE! In addition to learning, you will almost certainly get a discount, usually 10%, on your insurance, which for that boat should be a yacht policy, not just a boat policy. I would definitely get a trailer, it adds value and versatility, easier for maintenance and winter storage. If you will boat frequently during the season, then get a slip at a marina, it will give you more boating time. And remember to have fun!

            OOPS, forgot one. Get more truck than you think you will need, if you tow a lot. If not, say just in and out once each for the season, rent or borrow a truck. Newer half-tons should have enough towing capacity for that boat, just make sure it has the towing options, and 4 wheel drive doesn't hurt either...
            Jeff & Tara (And Ginger too)
            Lake Havasu City, AZ
            |
            Current: 2008 Playcraft 2400 MCM 350 Mag B3
            2000 Bayliner 3388 Cummins 4bta 250s (SOLD 2020)
            2000 Bayliner 2858 MCM 7.4 MPI B3 (SOLD 2018)
            2007 Bayliner 305 MCM twin 350 Mag B3s (SOLD 2012)
            2008 Bayliner 289 MCM 350 Mag Sea Core B3 (SOLD 2009)
            And 12 others...
            In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. 7-2-10

            Comment


              #7
              All good advice.

              The 246/266 is extremely seaworthy; always keep in mind your experience level. Its a good boat to slowly venture out with as your skills increase.

              I love it and my family loves it.

              There are many posts on the BOC from myself and other owners so tooling around the site should give you alot of info.

              Buying new or slightly used is good advice. I would add that a windlass is a must. A/C is also nice, I added it 2 years after I bought mine new in 2007.

              It's a great boat!

              Joey
              2007 Discovery 246
              5.0L MPI BRAVO III
              The "BAY-BEA"

              Comment


                #8
                All good advice.

                The 246/266 is extremely seaworthy; always keep in mind your experience level. Its a good boat to slowly venture out with as your skills increase.

                I love it and my family loves it.

                There are many posts on the BOC from myself and other owners so tooling around the site should give you alot of info.

                Buying new or slightly used is good advice. I would add that a windlass is a must. A/C is also nice, I added it 2 years after I bought mine new in 2007.

                It's a great boat!

                Joey
                2007 Discovery 246
                5.0L MPI BRAVO III
                The "BAY-BEA"

                Comment


                  #9
                  One thing not mentioned about the 246/266 is that it has considerable room for a hull of this length and that it still performs well with its single engine. Go much longer and you really need to start looking at twins. There has been a 2009 246 for sale here where I live (far from you BTW) for mid 40's. This boat has apparently never been in the water. I don't know any more about it than that, but it just goes to show that you CAN find bargains if you look around.

                  As far as towing it with that van:

                  Forgeddaboutit; TOO HEAVY!

                  One of the things that many boaters enjoy is simply hanging around the marina for the social aspects. Where I live, many boats never seem to even leave the dock! So, DO check into the cost of a slip and when you do, also check out the marina's amenities (restaurant, play area etc).

                  There aren't that many 246/266 owners here, but pretty much all of us love the boat.
                  2007 Discovery 246
                  300mpi BIII
                  Welcome island Lake Superior

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks for the answers. It looks like I have a better idea now from where I started


                    1. Definitely Store it in Marina. So no trailer needed.
                    2. It looks like it's seaworthy.
                    3. Probably buy new. This would probably be our first and last boat.




                    I think what I am going to do next is to see what is the cost involved in storing this in a Marina. Digging around some of the marina websites tells me that I might have to spend about $2500 to $3000 a year for a 26ft boat. Sounds steep for a cost of ownership but let me call them first. Maybe I am missing something.

                    Thanks Again.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      vacorda wrote:
                      Thanks for the answers. It looks like I have a better idea now from where I started
                      • 1 wrote:
                      • Definitely Store it in Marina. So no trailer needed.
                      • It looks like it's seaworthy.
                      • Probably buy new. This would probably be our first and last boat.




                      I think what I am going to do next is to see what is the cost involved in storing this in a Marina. Digging around some of the marina websites tells me that I might have to spend about $2500 to $3000 a year for a 26ft boat. Sounds steep for a cost of ownership but let me call them first. Maybe I am missing something.

                      Thanks Again.
                      I pay $255 a month for a slip with shore power here in Colorado. Our season is probably shorter than yours, if you can get a slip for that price I think it's a good deal.

                      Other things to consider if you rent a slip....you probably want to get bottom paint. You will pay higher fuel prices at the docks. Maintenance will be higher if you use the marinas mechanics (but you can find other that will come to the boat and work on it). You have to prepare yourself for the boating addiction, winters become much longer cause you can't stop thinking about getting back on the boat. Good luck, make sure you keep us posted with pictures when you buy.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        vacorda wrote:[*]This would probably be our first and last boat.[/LIST]
                        That sound you heard was the collective "suuuuurrrrrrreeeeeeee" noise of the rest of the cast members here to your quoted item above. That slight tickle you feel at the nape of your neck, that's 2foot-itis trying to break down your defenses already.

                        Welcome to the BOC.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          For your new vs. used choice, consider that you will have other costs besides the marina. Annual haul-outs, insurance, maintenance, add-ons you will want to buy, lot of fuel.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Insteada wrote:
                            That sound you heard was the collective "suuuuurrrrrrreeeeeeee" noise of the rest of the cast members here to your quoted item above. That slight tickle you feel at the nape of your neck, that's 2foot-itis trying to break down your defenses already.

                            Welcome to the BOC.
                            I may be the exception to this. When I looked for my new boat I had minus-1-foot-itis. Couldn't find a decent one which is why I went with the same size just in a lot better condition, a bow rider and 18 years younger.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              vacorda wrote:


                              Probably buy new. This would probably be our first and last boat.
                              I'm glad I'm not the only one that giggled at this. The difference between boat dealers and drug dealers is that drug dealers give you your first hit free. You'll be pounding on the doors of both of them after a while.

                              Comment

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