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Today was Plasti-dip day-gctid390198

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    Today was Plasti-dip day-gctid390198

    One of the few things that bugs me is frayed rope ends. I'm not particular about many things, but this is an annoyance and I like to fix it. So, I got out all my various utility lines, and trimmed the frayed ones, then dipped the ends in the Plasti-dip. For those who haven't found this stuff yet, it's a nice little plasticizer in a can that you can dip parts, or rope, or tool handles in and it forms a pretty nice solid seal on the end.

    It sticks to almost anything, and is quite durable. It's water proof, and resistant to most fuel and oil. A quick dip, then let it hang for four hours, then one more dip, and ropes are all set for at least a year, usually two. Avail at big-box hardware places.

    http://www.plastidip.com/diy.php

    No affiliation, ownership, etc, but my 401k may have shares I don't know.

    #2
    How to whip rope ends:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMq9KdOtSJ0

    I've used method two all my life and it will last for the life of the rope. I use waxed sailmakers twine and burn the ends of the rope after whipping and trimming.

    Comment


      #3
      But, I don't want whipped ends, I want plastic ends.

      Good reference though. I might try it when I have some twine on the boat, and I"m out at the lake without my plasti-dip.

      Comment


        #4
        I just heat my ends up with a heat gun, holds forever too.

        Comment


          #5
          kjs wrote:
          I just heat my ends up with a heat gun, holds forever too.
          A cigarette lighter also works well.


          Comment


            #6
            Whipped ends just look very professional too. Especially if you use colored waxed sailmakers thread.
            Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

            iBoatNW

            1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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              #7
              The whipped ends do look nice, I agree.

              I simply prefer the smooth feel of a simple heat melted and layed down end.

              If you do this with a wet gloove, you can lay them down nicely, and you can also go back at it a second time for any remaining burrs.

              Each to his own, eh?

              .
              Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
              2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
              Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
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                #8
                You want nautical looking?

                Do a crown knot and a backsplice down the rope.

                The other end should have an eyesplice in it.

                Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/693958=28580-pix 012.jpg[/img]
                Captharv 2001 2452
                "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

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                  #9
                  mole2 wrote:
                  A cigarette lighter also works well.

                  YOU FORGOT THE CHARGE ALL CREDIT CARD MAN BUSH !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:arrops
                  GARCHAR
                  1988 2655
                  2009 Volvo Penta 5.7 300 hp DP F3s
                  Twice Past Commodore
                  Northwest Outboard Trailer Sailors, Eugene,OR

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                    #10
                    these special methods to prevent a rope end from fraying all were extremely important at a time where ropes were made from natural materials.

                    Todays plastic stuff is a lot more slippery which means that these tricks won't hold as well any more, they just slide off. I got a new rope 2 weeks ago and it is that smooth that you can let it run through your hands under (moderate) load and there's no risk it will hurt you. I'm sure the only good way is to heat seal the ends or to use the plasti-dip stuff.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      kjs wrote:
                      these special methods to prevent a rope end from fraying all were extremely important at a time where ropes were made from natural materials.
                      Lines are still whipped all the time. Especially around thimbles, loop and bites. Melting the ends isn't a good option for braided lines like Gold-N-Braid and the likes. You have to learn to splice and whip.
                      Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                      iBoatNW

                      1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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                        #12
                        Some of us love true seamanship, some others don't. I love the art of the seaman that has been developed over the centuries. It works, that is why it is done.

                        Some just like the easy way of the butane backsplice or the cigarette lighter mush splice.

                        Me I love seamanship, that is why I got my AB's certificat

                        Comment


                          #13
                          sailorand wrote:
                          Some of us love true seamanship, some others don't. I love the art of the seaman that has been developed over the centuries. It works, that is why it is done.

                          Some just like the easy way of the butane backsplice or the cigarette lighter mush splice.

                          Me I love seamanship, that is why I got my AB's certificat
                          So, the lighter method is - unseamanlike?

                          Guilty.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Not really. It's just that a whipped line is as much a testament to the seamanship of the owner and the attention to detail it requires.

                            Nothing says that PlastiKote isn't a great product, or the method doesn't work. It's just another method. I quite enjoy the challenge of splicing and I wish I were better at it. My lines aren't whipped, but I can sure appreciate what it looks like when I see it.
                            Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                            iBoatNW

                            1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

                            Comment


                              #15
                              This



                              or

                              this?



                              Yea sure it is "right" but who like using three strand lines?

                              I will take a nice samson braided line with a "hack" end treatment over a three strand any day.

                              I won't even use three strand on my fender whips.
                              1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
                              1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
                              Nobody gets out alive.

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