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ANOTHER anchor rode question.-gctid387615

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    ANOTHER anchor rode question.-gctid387615

    Ok, got my shiny new 20lb., or so, anchor ,

    time to hook it to some new chain and rode. Boat is 21ft., about 4300lbs. Got 20ft. of 1/4in. galvanized chain, but am looking for opinions on type and size of rode. The old stuff I have is 3/8in. 3 strand, twisted synthetic of some description.

    So, what are the opinions on the best, or correct type of rope to use for ones anchor rode?

    I am already set on 7/16 or 3/8in. What next? Braid? Twisted? Nylon, dacron, polyester? No winch or windless to worry about.

    I will be buying at least 300ft., so want to be sure I spend my money on the best possible option.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

    James

    #2
    I would use a larger chain than one quarter inch. My rule of thumb is the chain should be the length of the boat and the bigger the better. As for the line you want it to be stretchy so nylon is a good choice. Money is usually the limiting factor here, the larger the diameter of the line the easier it is on your hands. Braid is easier to handle than 3 strand but harder to splice.

    It sounds like you have a good plan.

    Comment


      #3
      Twisted for me.

      Comment


        #4
        7/16 or (1/2) 3 strand. Back splicing double braid is very difficult and requires tools specifiv to the rope size. You really don't need the strength; the larger line is easier on the hands when employing and deploying the anchor.

        What I have in the 2452:

        Bow anchor--13# danforth, 6' of heavy plastic coated chain, 250' 1/2 3 strand.

        Stern anchors/spare-- (2) 8# danforths, 10' 1/4" chain, 100' of 7/16 3 strand. An extra 100' if 3 strand 3/8 nylon to be bent into the rode if necessary.

        When we anchor out at SIlver Glen springs, bow and stern anchors are necessary. So with a big bow anchor and 2 sterns, we are ready.....
        Captharv 2001 2452
        "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

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          #5
          1/2 twisted line. 6 foot of chain and enough line to hold in water you boat in. Rule of thumb 5 to 7 times the depth of the water. Include the height of the bow pulpit in your calc. If going in the ocean carry a sea anchor. I also carry one size larger in anchor if I am caught in a storm or I am hanging on the hook overnite.

          Comment


            #6
            notatthebottom wrote:
            1/2 twisted line. 6 foot of chain and enough line to hold in water you boat in. Rule of thumb 5 to 7 times the depth of the water. Include the height of the bow pulpit in your calc. If going in the ocean carry a sea anchor. I also carry one size larger in anchor if I am caught in a storm or I am hanging on the hook overnite.
            natb,

            Usually length of chain equals length of boat, and as for the 5-7 to 1 scope ratio, ain't gunna happen. Ocean anchoring here. Don't have room on the boat for 1000 - 1500 feet of rope.

            I like the idea of using braid. I also know about the shock absorbing property of nylon, though not braid.

            I think heavier than 1/4 inch chain might be a little over-kill on a boat my size, although I do have about 45 feet of stainless 3/8 inch sitting around.

            I have a line on 600 feet of 7/16 braided. Maybe I should see how inexpensively I can have him part with it.

            Then I guess I need to decide on my 3/8 SS chain or buy a chunk of 1/4 inch galv.

            Thank you gents for the direction.

            James

            Comment


              #7
              Galvanized chain is good, my opinion is that 1/4" will do. As for rode length, the first consideration is the depth of water you wish to be able to anchor in, and in what conditions. Pulling anchor rode by hand is real work, as we well know! So laying out 10 to 1 rode for stormy conditions in 150 fathoms by hand would not be my idea of a swell boat ride. But 10 to 1 in real bad conditions is a recommendation for all weather boaters that is taught by some. I have carried about 700 feet on my 2002 Trophy on the big pond, and would carry more if money and locker space allowed. Frankly, I would only use nylon, but either twist or braid is good for me. I actually have used both at the same time to get that 700 feet, connected with a taped bowline knot.

              There is so much more to anchoring that you can learn from local boaters in your area, find out what is commonly used there. The experience they have is most valuable to you!

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