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trouble stopping my trailer-gctid385898

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    #16
    wildman wrote:
    I have trouble stopping my trailer. I figure the boat and trailer weigh around 7400 lbs. I have a 1/2 ton truck with front disk and rear drums. The trailer has hydraulic activated drums on the front axle. I had to stop quick, and it didn't go so well. I realized the front wheels were skidding and I drifted dangerously out of my lane. The hitch receiver is a class IV load carrying hitch attached to the rear of the frame only.What should I be changing, checking[ATTACH]CONFIG wrote:
    28168[/ATTAC

    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img] H]?
    i had somewhat the same problem. I think i got it taken care of this weekend. I found this dually in very good shape for what I believe was a good buy. I will only use it 2 times a year but, piece of mind was worth the investment.

    Comment


      #17
      It sounds like your trailer brakes are not working. First check the resevoir on the actuator on the tougue and make sure it is full. If it is empty you will need to bleed the system by opening the valves on the brakes and working the actuator to get the air out. If there is adequate fluid the brakes may need adjustment as they are not self adjusting like on an auto. When properly adjusted and maintained drum brakes on a surge brake system are just as effective as discs.

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        #18
        SeaTea wrote:
        ...Make sure the trailer is level when it is on the truck since a tongue-down situation will push the nose of the truck up under hard braking....
        That is a good point. A good case for some equipment to keep the rear from sagging down. Maybe a load-distributing hitch.

        Comment


          #19
          2850Bounty wrote:
          ...you will be able to bleed the system by manually operating the master cylinder. ...
          How do I manually operate the master cylinder? I'd love to know. I tried to look at the fluid, but the top was a plastic cap that didn't seem to want to come off. I have not inspected the brake shoe system, but I will or have it done soon.

          Comment


            #20
            Make a loop with your safety chain. Use a pry bar (a 2x4 will work) and put one end in the loop under the tongue and the long end up in front of the hitch. Pushing on the long end will depress the actuator.

            Comment


              #21
              1) bleed out your trailer lines starting with the farthest wheel working to closest. A vaccuum bleeder workers better than trying to manually pump your actuator. (keep resevoir topped up when doing this-no air introduction!)

              2) Lift your trailer, pull wheel assembly apart, grease bearings, assemble wheel rotate and adjust drum/ shoe friction to the point where you can just start to hear shoe rub on the drum (all wheels) Free so far!

              3)Take out for test run braking frequently and feel the hub to make sure its not to hot afterwards; you may have to readjust brake shoes to drums again.

              If your actuator or brake assemblies are faulty now would be the time to consider all possiblities such as; new actuator, another braking axle or even going to electric brakes if your at fresh water (electric not recommended for salt) I have had electric brakes and much prefer them to the actuated system. They are easier to set up for road conditons, easier to back trailer and better for heavier loads.

              Electric drum brake assemblies usaully bolt on to the same spot as your hydraulic but you need to wire your trailer for each wheel. You will also need a battery for emergency brake detonation and a controller in the vehicle.

              You can also purchase electric disc brake kits.

              Good luck.

              Comment


                #22
                TrophyTroubles wrote:
                1) bleed out your trailer lines starting with the farthest wheel working to closest. A vaccuum bleeder workers better than trying to manually pump your actuator. (keep resevoir topped up when doing this-no air introduction!)
                Are you sure about this sequence? You want to have all air out of the system which means you first bleed the closest brake to the actuator. Follow the brake lines from the actuator to the brake furthest away.

                The manual for my disk brakes (UFP) agrees with this............

                Comment


                  #23
                  I'll bet the trailer brake system is shot. I can see some rust in the picture which leads me to believe it has been in salt water. I'd pull a wheel and drum and have a look at the insides. You don't have to unbolt the wheel, just pull the bearing cap or buddy and undo the bearing. I'll bet it is not pretty and unrepairable. You will need to replace from the backing plates out. You really should have brake systems on both axles.Brake flush kits are now available, too. Don't forget to also check the brake lines, I 'll bet they are rusted out, too. And the master cylinder... pull that cap and have a look. Probably empty. If any rust at all... replace it. There's a fair amount of work involved here and you may even need to consider getting another trailer.

                  Been there...

                  Ken

                  Pugetsoundog (woof)

                  Comment


                    #24
                    I just re-read my post and realized I was stating it incorrectly by saying "how much the axle moves up". I should have said "How much the frame/body moves up away from the axle". Sorry!

                    Comment


                      #25
                      There is another way to shift some weight off your truck. Move the boat back on the trailer.

                      On RV's the weight is said to be 10% of the total weight on the tongue. That, for some reason, isn't necessary for a boat. I forgot why, maybe because there is no blunt front.

                      If you don't fishtail at any speed, you have enough tongue weight. And it doesn't need to be anywhere near 10%.

                      Good point Jeff made about to much tongue weight taking the load off the front brakes.

                      Another thing I like is air bags to level the load and give stability.

                      Doug
                      Started boating 1955
                      Number of boats owned 32
                      Bayliners
                      2655
                      2755
                      2850
                      3870 presently owned
                      Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                      Comment


                        #26
                        10% tongue weight is too much. My new trailer (Magic Tilt) states 5% tongue weight - 10,400 GVWR = 520 lbs. Mine sits right at 550 lbs (a little heavy, but close enough). This is a duel axle aluminum for 28' boat.

                        Do different manufacturers suggest different tongue weights? I always thought 5% was standard. 1,040 lbs seems way too heavy for mine.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          wildman wrote:
                          How do I manually operate the master cylinder? I'd love to know. I tried to look at the fluid, but the top was a plastic cap that didn't seem to want to come off. I have not inspected the brake shoe system, but I will or have it done soon.
                          You will need to access the fluid reservoir and make sure that it is full, or near full.

                          Use the emergency arm to activate the master cylinder plunger.

                          Don't be surprised if the entire braking system is rusty, corroded, and/or somehow not functioning.

                          People tend to defer maintenance on these.

                          If this is leaf sprung, your rocker arms and spring arrangement should offer the correct load sharing between axles.

                          The part about leveling the trailer frame, IMO, has more to do with axle load sharing, than it will to do with force against the two vehicle.

                          If torsion axle suspension, a level frame is even more important since torsion axles are not load sharing friendly.

                          (no rocker arm to equally distribute the weight)

                          No matter what arrangement, while decelerating, the load inertia will force and add some dynamic tongue weight. It can't help but do so.

                          I seem to recall a target tongue weight of 5% to 7% .
                          Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                          2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                          Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                          Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                          Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Jeff H wrote:
                            10% tongue weight is too much. My new trailer (Magic Tilt) states 5% tongue weight - 10,400 GVWR = 520 lbs. Mine sits right at 550 lbs (a little heavy, but close enough). This is a duel axle aluminum for 28' boat.

                            Do different manufacturers suggest different tongue weights? I always thought 5% was standard. 1,040 lbs seems way too heavy for mine.
                            As I said for RV's it is 10%. Actually the accepted figure is 10 to 15%.

                            I also stated that it was not necessary for a boat. 5% may be more than necessary for a boat. If I recall correctly I had about 350# on a 10,000 boat and trailer.

                            When I got it it pulled perfect bringing it home. I filled it with fuel and it fishtailed. I moved it ahead a couple of inches and pulled it another 10 years with no problems.

                            Another thing, the height of the top of the ball to the level ground loaded should be 17 to 21 inches. That also is industry standard and it makes the trailer level. If its not level more wieght will be on one of the axles than the other.

                            Or put a level on the trailer.

                            This is more important with a tri axle trailer.

                            Air bags on the truck makes this easy. It doesn't increase the capacity of the truck but it makes it level and stable.

                            Doug
                            Started boating 1955
                            Number of boats owned 32
                            Bayliners
                            2655
                            2755
                            2850
                            3870 presently owned
                            Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                            Comment


                              #29
                              KJS

                              You are correct! You do start with the closest and work to the farthest! and even more important if utilizing the actuator to push your fluid through versus a vaccuum.

                              I stand corrected, thank you.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Thanks for the discussion on the tounge weight. I have some work to do. It will be a while before I use the boat now - I just received some news that means I won't be boating for a while. Signing off for a few weeks at least.

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