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Coast Guard Boating accident stats-gctid384426

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    Coast Guard Boating accident stats-gctid384426

    I received the Boating accident stats by email yesterday and cruised thru them. I picked the top numbers in each catigory to come up with the "most likely to get into an accident scenerio"

    This was done strictly for my amusment, and some of the figures they reported may not be accurate. Example: minor injury, such as a cut or burn not requiring a Doctor to treat, is not a reportable accident, so their stats only include what was reported.

    You are most likely to get into a boating accident if:

    You are in Florida, in July,A sunday, between noon and 6:30 PM on a lake, while cruising (and fishing as a second activity), in an open motorboat, 16-26' in lenght, with an 75-150 HP engine.

    The weather conditions will be o-6 MPH winds, and less than 6" waves, with clear visibility.

    The accident is most likely a collision with another pleasure boat or a fixed object (NAVAIDS are included here). The injury will be a broken bone or cut. The victim will be 20-29 yrs old, while the opertor of the boat is 35-55 yr old, and has 101-500 hrs of experience, and NO formal (classroom)safe boating course. (Courses via computer count here, also)

    Now, this one is a real stat. I am paraphrasing from the report:

    Alcohol as a factor in a relatively low % of NON-fatal accidents, but relatively high in those resultant in death.

    Other main causes are: ( in order of percentage) Improper lookout, operator inatenntion, excessive speed (for conditions), operator inexperience, alcohol use, and navrules infraction.

    So, basically, if you don't watch where you are going, not paying attention, going too fast, not knowing what you are doing, don't know navrules, and drinking (while cruising or fishing)--- Boy, you in a heap of trouble.......

    When I first joined the CG auxiliary, we had a Chief Warrant officer as base commander. He said that "recreational boaters leave their common sense at the marina when they go out boating"

    After 26 years in the Auxiliary, assiting over 250 boaters, I will not dispute that statement

    For those interested, heres a link to the stats:

    http://www.uscgboating.org/statistic...tatistics.aspx

    Click on the word "download" for the year you want
    Captharv 2001 2452
    "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

    #2
    According to stats, most accident/fatalities occur between 2:00pm and 4:30pm, during calm weather condition in the water temperature above 60F. Main contributing factors consumption of alcohol, improper lookout, operator inexperience.

    Comment


      #3
      GrindKore wrote:
      According to stats, most accident/fatalities occur between 2:00pm and 4:30pm, during calm weather condition in the water temperature above 60F. Main contributing factors consumption of alcohol, improper lookout, operator inexperience.
      Thats a good summary...

      Some of the data figures were so close, and I combined them.

      The alcohol factor, however, is there and why many states have very heavy penalties for BUI.
      Captharv 2001 2452
      "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

      Comment


        #4
        GrindKore wrote:
        According to stats, most accident/fatalities occur between 2:00pm and 4:30pm, during calm weather condition in the water temperature above 60F. Main contributing factors consumption of alcohol, improper lookout, operator inexperience.
        yesterday we were trolling along, calm seas where we choose.. and a huge cruise ship was exiting the channel for out town.. it kicked it into gear once out of the channel, there were several little skiffs around and us... well their wake came at us, and the capt at the time of our boat, couldnt get the bow into it, didnt realize the wave was that big till to late.. a huge wave wacked us broad sided and things in the galley and salon went flying and me. the wave smacked the starboasrd side and went up the salon windows to the flydeck.. our 3888 didnt like that size of a wave, nor me.. it rocked servely back and forth.. well, I wont tell what happened next. but could have been worse... we we are alive, and I was shaken... I HATE cruise ships now..:worth.. the friend feels horrible about it, and now I have to clean the carpet under the salon table.... AGAIN..lol.. he is an old salt who knows the seas well, just got thrown off by the ship since we were well enough away..

        Comment


          #5
          GrindKore wrote:
          According to stats, most accident/fatalities occur between 2:00pm and 4:30pm, during calm weather condition in the water temperature above 60F. Main contributing factors consumption of alcohol, improper lookout, operator inexperience.
          Sounds like a nice day and nice days have more people on the water. The more peeps. the more accidents.

          I am firm believer in some form of licensing for boaters. Nothing complicated, just maybe a 4 hour class.

          I would not even have an age limit on it. If 5 year old can pass, he/she should be able to drive the boat. This may not

          be a really good idea so that is when parental supervision should come in. Young children usually like a certain amount

          of rules and are proud of themselves when they achieve something - like a license. More than likely, the child will be correcting the adult.

          Anyway, didn't mean for this to get political.

          Comment


            #6
            This is a great post! Stats don't lie. I've been reading through some of these reports and its a good wake-up call. I'm not the most dangerous boater on the water by a long shot, nor am I the safest 100% of the time - but I suspect many of these accidents were by people just like me, and you.

            Comment


              #7
              Great post. I'm active duty Coast Guard and worked last weekend, and believe me, those stats are dead on. Saturday and Sunday was nothing but Search and Rescue and assistance posts.

              Be careful out there, learn your NAVRULES and take a boating safety course.

              Comment


                #8
                alive, and I was shaken... I HATE cruise ships now.... the friend feels horrible about it, and now I have to clean the carpet under the salon table.... AGAIN..lol.. he is an old salt who knows the seas well, just got thrown off by the ship since we were well enough away..
                If you got the name of the boat, send a complaint to both the USCG and the cruise line.

                Comment


                  #9
                  TonyB wrote:
                  Sounds like a nice day and nice days have more people on the water. The more peeps. the more accidents.

                  I am firm believer in some form of licensing for boaters. Nothing complicated, just maybe a 4 hour class.

                  I would not even have an age limit on it. If 5 year old can pass, he/she should be able to drive the boat. This may not

                  be a really good idea so that is when parental supervision should come in. Young children usually like a certain amount

                  of rules and are proud of themselves when they achieve something - like a license. More than likely, the child will be correcting the adult.

                  Anyway, didn't mean for this to get political.
                  I tend to agree, although I do believe there should be an age limit. If you have to get licensed for a car why not a boat? Boats are, in some ways, more complicated to operate and the rules are not necessarily "common sense" when it comes to who has the right of way. In a car you know where you're supposed to be because there are lines on the road and plenty of signs to give you direction. No so on a boat.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    [QUOTE=captharv;687951You are most likely to get into a boating accident if:

                    You are in Florida, in July,A sunday, between noon and 6:30 PM on a lake, while cruising (and fishing as a second activity), in an open motorboat, 16-26' in lenght, with an 75-150 HP engine.

                    The weather conditions will be o-6 MPH winds, and less than 6" waves, with clear visibility.

                    The accident is most likely a collision with another pleasure boat or a fixed object (NAVAIDS are included here). The injury will be a broken bone or cut. The victim will be 20-29 yrs old, while the opertor of the boat is 35-55 yr old, and has 101-500 hrs of experience, and NO formal (classroom)safe boating course. (Courses via computer count here, also)

                    I don't see this as any revelation. Accidents happen when people go boating, which is usually in good weather.
                    David
                    http://www.cambridgeadvertising.org
                    http://www.davidladewig.com

                    Comment


                      #11
                      [QUOTE]Four Pyrates wrote:
                      [QUOTE=captharv;687951You are most likely to get into a boating accident if:

                      You are in Florida, in July,A sunday, between noon and 6:30 PM on a lake, while cruising (and fishing as a second activity), in an open motorboat, 16-26' in lenght, with an 75-150 HP engine.

                      The weather conditions will be o-6 MPH winds, and less than 6" waves, with clear visibility.

                      The accident is most likely a collision with another pleasure boat or a fixed object (NAVAIDS are included here). The injury will be a broken bone or cut. The victim will be 20-29 yrs old, while the opertor of the boat is 35-55 yr old, and has 101-500 hrs of experience, and NO formal (classroom)safe boating course. (Courses via computer count here, also)

                      I don't see this as any revelation. Accidents happen when people go boating, which is usually in good weather.[/QUOTE]

                      Recreational boaters go out when the weather is good, the pros (i.e. commercial vessels) go out in all kinds of conditions so I would think the relevant point here is that is training and experience help reduce accidents.

                      Comment

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