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Is it just me? Am I wrong to think this way...New Alternator for $230 versus $100-gctid383992

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    Is it just me? Am I wrong to think this way...New Alternator for $230 versus $100-gctid383992

    If you have followed 2 of my other recent threads, you know that I recently did something stupid, fried my alternator, and now I have to pay for that mistake. Fine.

    Now I don't mind paying someone for their services - but I also don't like to feel like I'm being taken advantage of either.

    Am I reacting the wrong way to this?

    Saturday morning I fried my alternator. I called a local service dealer (15 minutes away from house). I won't mention the dealer, that's not what this "rant" is going to be about, and I'd like to keep this thread from being removed, if possible.

    I'm told he doesn't stock any new alternators - however, he has a rebuilt one (maybe compatible for my boat engine). Now the decision to go with new versus rebuilt is a personal one - I chose to go with new. He tells me a new one is going to run around $300.

    I give him the part number, 863077-1, engine information, 2005 Mercruiser 5.7, etc. This was Saturday 5/19.

    Afterwards I Google the part number, and I find all kinds of links for a brand new alternator part number 863077-1 for under $100. Every spec matches exactly per the labelling on the alternator (I took a picture of the label so I could reference it).

    So now I'm thinking when I get a call back from this guy I'm going to be quoted something lower than $300, right?

    I get a call back today, Tuesday, 5/22 - he "finally" found a supplier for a new alternator, but questioned whether the last number was a "1" or a "T". I assured him it was a "1" (I have a photo of it). He says his supplier could only find an alternator ending with a "T", and the alternator would be $230.

    Now am I reacting the wrong way - I said what essentially amounted to "hell no", but was more polite than that over the phone (he hadn't ordered the alternator yet, so he wasn't financially committed to it). If I can find the alternator on Google for under $100 from multiple sources, how is he unable to find the "right" part number, and run 2 1/2 times higher?

    I offered to buy the alternator myself, have it shipped to me, and pay him for the labor - sure, I could install the alternator myself, but I'm a little concerned I might not get the right tension setting on the belt. I'd rather a professional who has the right tools do this. He tells me he doesn't install "outside purchased" parts.

    I offered to let him buy the alternator "directly" and in addition charge me his labor. I e-mailed him the picture (so there is no confusion it's the right part number, etc) and I included a link for a new alternator specifically matching the part numbers on the label in the picture.

    Like I stated earlier - I don't mind paying a local guy a fair price for their services, but is it "fair" asking nearly 2 1/2 times the cost of a part, and then not expecting the customer to feel they are being taken advantage of?

    Either that, or his supplier is taking advantage of him?

    Am I the one "wrong" here. In the other threads some of you had told me getting my fried alternator repaired would be cheaper than buying a new one, but all along I was of the impression a new one would only be $100 or so - Is there something "wrong" with the suppliers offering the alternator for $100 that I should be aware of?

    #2
    Robert K wrote:
    If you have followed 2 of my other recent threads, you know that I recently did something stupid, fried my alternator, and now I have to pay for that mistake. Fine.

    Now I don't mind paying someone for their services - but I also don't like to feel like I'm being taken advantage of either.

    Am I reacting the wrong way to this?

    Saturday morning I fried my alternator. I called a local service dealer (15 minutes away from house). I won't mention the dealer, that's not what this "rant" is going to be about, and I'd like to keep this thread from being removed, if possible.

    I'm told he doesn't stock any new alternators - however, he has a rebuilt one (maybe compatible for my boat engine). Now the decision to go with new versus rebuilt is a personal one - I chose to go with new. He tells me a new one is going to run around $300.

    I give him the part number, 863077-1, engine information, 2005 Mercruiser 5.7, etc. This was Saturday 5/19.

    Afterwards I Google the part number, and I find all kinds of links for a brand new alternator part number 863077-1 for under $100. Every spec matches exactly per the labelling on the alternator (I took a picture of the label so I could reference it).

    So now I'm thinking when I get a call back from this guy I'm going to be quoted something lower than $300, right?

    I get a call back today, Tuesday, 5/22 - he "finally" found a supplier for a new alternator, but questioned whether the last number was a "1" or a "T". I assured him it was a "1" (I have a photo of it). He says his supplier could only find an alternator ending with a "T", and the alternator would be $230.

    Now am I reacting the wrong way - I said what essentially amounted to "hell no", but was more polite than that over the phone (he hadn't ordered the alternator yet, so he wasn't financially committed to it). If I can find the alternator on Google for under $100 from multiple sources, how is he unable to find the "right" part number, and run 2 1/2 times higher?

    I offered to buy the alternator myself, have it shipped to me, and pay him for the labor - sure, I could install the alternator myself, but I'm a little concerned I might not get the right tension setting on the belt. I'd rather a professional who has the right tools do this. He tells me he doesn't install "outside purchased" parts.

    I offered to let him buy the alternator "directly" and in addition charge me his labor. I e-mailed him the picture (so there is no confusion it's the right part number, etc) and I included a link for a new alternator specifically matching the part numbers on the label in the picture.

    Like I stated earlier - I don't mind paying a local guy a fair price for their services, but is it "fair" asking nearly 2 1/2 times the cost of a part, and then not expecting the customer to feel they are being taken advantage of?

    Either that, or his supplier is taking advantage of him?

    Am I the one "wrong" here. In the other threads some of you had told me getting my fried alternator repaired would be cheaper than buying a new one, but all along I was of the impression a new one would only be $100 or so - Is there something "wrong" with the suppliers offering the alternator for $100 that I should be aware of?
    There are about 4000 reasons why he is/could be/should be higher.

    1. They make money on parts as well as labor.

    2. Is he selling you a Mercury or other brand part, and you're looking at generic "replaces" versions or the Delco-branded OEM unit?

    3. A NEW alternator is not usually $100 for an OEM unit. You're looking at $100 to have one rebuilt... if new ones of the same quality were the same price, nobody would have their alternator rebuilt.

    I just went through this with my mom's car - $705 for a new Volvo alternator, dealer wanted $500 for a replacement, factory rebuilt Bosch with 2-year warranty was $208, rebuild = $100.

    You get what you pay for when it comes to price vs quality, but there's also markup for brand, by the guy installing it, the resellers between, etc.

    Comment


      #3
      Quick search of the part number shows mostly DB Electrical as the supplier for the less than $100.00 alternator.

      A search of the manufactuers part number ADR0316 (which is a supposed "direct replacement for a dozen or more alternators) shows this part is from a manufactuer in Korea.

      For use with MERCRUISER Models: Model 5.7L EFI (Gen +)

      Model 5.7L MIE

      Model 8.1S HO

      Model 8.1S Horizon

      Replaces MERCRUISER: 19020612

      Specifications:

      Equipment Type: Inboard-Engines

      Model Year: 98-On

      99-On

      01-On

      Engine Used On: GM 5.7L - 350ci - 8cyl

      GM 8.1L - 496ci - 8cyl

      More Info: Delco (Korean) 70A Alt.

      Delco 70A - S/N 0L677227 & Up

      Delco (Korean) 70A Alt.

      MFG: DR

      AMP: 70

      Our Part Number: ADR0316

      I will say as for DB Electrical the statement at the bottom of the webpage made me spit my coffee.......

      QUOTE

      Covered By Our One Year Warranty!

      Dont be fooled by cheap imitations.

      I owned a KIA

      There is a reason I do not own a KIA anymore.
      Boatless at this time

      A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

      Comment


        #4
        rodWell, I agree there is something wrong with your mechanic in charging that much for a used altenator. The labor cost can very based on the difficulty of removal and replacement issues. If this is a electrical specialist who rebuilds original components that might be different, but the person who does this locally charges less for rebuilding than it is for a new one. Check with other boat shops and consider taking pics of the wireing and do it yourself. Sometimes its worth the personal test and saves lots of money too. My first test was at 55 and built a big barn with no prior experience and the same was true when I put in a new motor and outdrive on my 2655 at age 61. So GO FOR IT. Gary
        GARCHAR
        1988 2655
        2009 Volvo Penta 5.7 300 hp DP F3s
        Twice Past Commodore
        Northwest Outboard Trailer Sailors, Eugene,OR

        Comment


          #5
          The more things you can do yourself, like installing an alternator, the more you will know about a boat, and the more money you will save.

          As I suggested before, take the blown alternator to a shop and have them estimate rebuilding. If all that wrong with it is doides,the repair cost may plesantly suprize you. And, if the alternator came out of the boat, you absolutely know it will go back in.

          If you remove it yourself, draw a diagram of the wire hookup. This saves a lot of swearing when replacing it. As far as setting the belt tension, the new serpentine belts are not nearly as critical as the old vee belts. The manual says to set it so the long run at the top deflects about 1/2" when you press on it with your finger.

          I, too, look for the best deal, however, it has to be the right parts. When the alternator in the 2452went out 3 years ago, I took it to an alternator shop who was a Delco distributor. He could not get the parts it needed (Some of the Mando units are made in Korea, and only the diode banks and brushes are available here. Mine had a shorted rotor winding), he quoted me $250 for a new one.

          I said I can do better than that thru the web. He said, OK. Its been here a year, Ill sell it to you for my cost, $145. I said ok.

          An alternaor specialty shop will sell at lower prices. A mechanic, especially a marine one, can't
          Captharv 2001 2452
          "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

          Comment


            #6
            Just some info to add..i work for a marine parts seller in canada the oem alt here retail price is

            514.19....WOW....the ADR0316 ALT retail price is 239.93...the prices there are way better than here to start with...we sell more of the ADR0316 based on price and no issues...some merc oem parts prices are out to lunch for sure for us here in canada...for the price to around 1/2 the price for oem from b.c. to washington crazy....

            Comment


              #7
              Replacing alternator is one of the few easy to do repairs I would not even consider about calling mechanic. Seriously, order a correct OEM or Sierra replacement brand and install it yourself. It takes basic tools and is very easy to do as alternator is always very accessible.

              Comment


                #8
                I had a short thread about 10 days ago on here - I was investigating the wiring at the back of my alternator for corrosion and the output post just disintegrated in my hand. I checked online and found an oem replacement for £184 GBP (~$250).

                Ended up going to a local Alternator repair shop based on advice from guys on here and paid £70 GBP to have it repaired. Re-Installed it myself - this really was a simple job and I've never ever touched an engine of any description in my life*. Don't worry about the serpentine belt either. As long as the longest section only deflects by 1/2" you will be fine.

                I now have a perfectly functioning alternator and enhanced understanding of my boat. OF course, you could simply purchase a replacement and do the same thing but there's nothing like having the reassurance that your "reconditioned" alternator will definitely fit your engine.

                * I had purchased a Seloc manual the week before this happened and read through most of it so as to get an understanding of my engine. I would highly recommend you do something similar as knowing your engine/boat really will save you some day. Not just money, but literally save you on that day when you get stuck out on the water with engine problems - believe me, that day *will* come eventually.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I received excellent advice from BOC concerning my post earlier in the year concerning the fact that the Alternator Tests OK, but Voltmeter on the dash reads low. Turned out the Large Red main wire connector was overheated and did not allow enough current to pass thru, or did with great difficulty. I just returned from a week long boat trip and the alternator charged both batteries (both new, and one at a time) easily. I was at peace. IMPORTANT !! When I took the Old batteries out, I had them fully tested as part of the replacement. Turns out 1 of the batteries was SHORTED INSIDE. What this meant (i was told at the alternator shop) was the alternator kept trying to push current to the bad battery - 40 amps continuously as long as the switch was turned to that battery, and the wiring couldn't take it forever. I would recommend testing the batteries as part of the alternator replacement. Maybe a bad battery pushed the alternator over the edge. As far as rebuilding the alternator. An Alternator shop can take an OEM Mercruiser Alternator and completely replace the guts.. turn cut the stator and new regulator and diodes for about $100. This is only if the windings are OK. With no boat mechanic skills, I REPLACED THE ALTERNATOR 4 TIMES in 2 days. IT IS EASY. I would go with the OEM alternator, even at over 2 times the cost. I would have paid $400 not to have had the problem ruin a previous week long boat trip to Lake Havasu Arizona.
                  cglazier - "Fiftybucks"
                  1995 2855 7.4 bravo II

                  Comment


                    #10
                    This is the alternator currently in the boat.



                    The prices I'm qouting are for a NEW alternator, not a rebuild.

                    Seaching specifically for Mercury Marine Part 863077-1, that's where I got DB Electric for $90 NEW

                    http://www.dbelectrical.com/p-3650-n...-19020611.aspx

                    Searching for part number 863077T, then I get the $250 and up alternators.

                    http://www.marinepowerservice.com/Bo...roductID=40931

                    What I am finding is the more expensive alternators are more than likely due to the name/quality of the manufacturer - so as stated - you get what you paid for.

                    What has me a little concerned about the upper end alternator - 65 amps versus the current alternator as 70 amps.

                    OK - so now I can see where everyone saying rebuild would be cheaper than new - sure, if buying new $250 alternator.

                    So does it make sense to pay about $100 to repair the current alternator, or pay the same $100 for a new one which is exactly the one that is already in the boat? Or does it make more sense to pay the $250 for a "better" brand?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Robert K wrote:
                      This is the alternator currently in the boat.



                      The prices I'm qouting are for a NEW alternator, not a rebuild.

                      Seaching specifically for Mercury Marine Part 863077-1, that's where I got DB Electric for $90 NEW

                      http://www.dbelectrical.com/p-3650-n...-19020611.aspx

                      Searching for part number 863077T, then I get the $250 and up alternators.

                      http://www.marinepowerservice.com/Bo...roductID=40931

                      What I am finding is the more expensive alternators are more than likely due to the name/quality of the manufacturer - so as stated - you get what you paid for.

                      What has me a little concerned about the upper end alternator - 65 amps versus the current alternator as 70 amps.

                      OK - so now I can see where everyone saying rebuild would be cheaper than new - sure, if buying new $250 alternator.

                      So does it make sense to pay about $100 to repair the current alternator, or pay the same $100 for a new one which is exactly the one that is already in the boat? Or does it make more sense to pay the $250 for a "better" brand?
                      If you are comfortable replacing it yourself, buy cheap and keep spares. There is no rule that says brand A will last longer than brand B. Both brand name Quicksilver (mercury) and aftermarket will likely to burn out the same if shorted out or abused. However, some will argue that brand-name parts are of higher quality and thus better. Same argument as wall-mart brand sneakers and Nikies IMHO, both made in Asia.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Depends.

                        Would you rather have a Rolex or a cheaper knock off from Korea that says Rolex.

                        Me, when it comes to the boat I don't usually skimp. Especially when my wife and kids may depend on my choices.

                        I'll buy OEM parts for the engine, the "cheapest I go is buying Sierra filter for the oil, and belts from the local CarQuest.

                        There is a reason I paid 180 for the fuel pump I had on the Mercruiser 165 I played with.

                        Alaskan waters are a bit different, you can get places with no radio contact really fast, really deep bays, really high mountains, really rough waters.

                        I also refuse to skimp on the Scotch when we are anchored, Glenlivet with glacial ice or just plain water.
                        Boatless at this time

                        A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I have had very good luck having a local shop repair alternators and starters.

                          I have no problem with a local rebuild.

                          As said, replacement is very easy.

                          Doug
                          Started boating 1955
                          Number of boats owned 32
                          Bayliners
                          2655
                          2755
                          2850
                          3870 presently owned
                          Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I took my old alternator to a alternator rebulder with his own shop. He exchanged my faulty one with a rebulid; that was five years and $75 ago! Simple to do, undue positive post off your battery, mark your wires connected to the alternator. Loosen bolt holding tension on your belt, then the two holding alt in place. When back in position tighten the belt tension so that you only have 1/2" play either way. Connect alt wires then batt post. done!

                            I'm with all the other guys that offered do it yourself advice on this one!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              FYI

                              Auto, marine , or bike shop parts are marked up 100 percent of what the shop pays for them. Now keep in mind we buy our parts cheeper then you can. Now if you were to compair apples to apples on the alt your talking about i would bet his would be the better brand and better warantee.

                              When you sell parts and install them you don't use cheep crap becaues you only want to do it once and you want your cust to be happy. Price is not frist to people. Getting it fixed right the frist time is top of the list and not having it happen again. Price comes about 3rd to 4th.

                              Now say you buy the 100 dollars alt and it dies out in the ocean / or lake how much is a tow home going to be becaues you wanted the cheep one.

                              Also repair shops of any kind will not eat on labor alone to much over head. Unless you know the biz you you would not see the cost of doing biz.

                              Comment

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