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Suddenly don(39)t feel so bad about my boat-gctid383495

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    Suddenly don(39)t feel so bad about my boat-gctid383495

    My boat is far from perfect. i picked her up for 2500 with a good trailer. Runs well. I have some water intrustion in my transom as evident from transom mount bolts embedding in the wood a milimeter or two. I don't think I'm that far gone yet, but I do know what is in my future.

    Anyway, my buddy bought his boat for 14k. it's a 96 Larson 240 Daycruiser. This boat actually made me fall in love with boating and inspired me to get my own. I went up to his house this weekend to work on his traim tabs as they weren't working. i crawled up in the engine compartment and found the pump loosley sitting upside down not attatched to anything. I asked if he knew why it was upside down.

    "I don't know boats," was his answer.

    So i filled up the reservoir once right side up and the pump worked fine. However, it still wasn't attatched to anything. I put my finger on the transom where it had been previously mounted and my finger WENT STRAIGHT THROUGH UNTIL I TOUCHED THE GELCOAT. I started feeling around. The whole transom, except the middle area where the bellhousing mates with the outdrive coudl be pushed through with one finger (there seemed to be an extra piece of fiberglassed plywood in the middle). I showed him, but he didn't seem to worried as he was selling it. *shudder

    So, I drove home feeling pretty good. I was telling my wife about it and I am just amazed how my boat is a decade older (somewhat of a beater cosmetically) and is more sound than his boat which cost significantly more.

    Moral of the story: it's all about MAINTENANCE and prior care. I've heard people on this forum talk about this before but never really saw it first hand.

    #2
    Do you think he will tell a buyer about the rotted transom?

    Comment


      #3
      hopefully the buyer gets a survey.

      If he doesn't disclose it he could be liable for repairs.

      Perfect example why we suggest a survey. Even on an older boat. You don't want to buy this problem even if you are spending only a few thousand on it. The repairs could exceed the cost of repair and the boat won't be worth any more. It is expected a boat being sold has a solid hull or you buy it knowing it needs repair.

      Doug
      Started boating 1955
      Number of boats owned 32
      Bayliners
      2655
      2755
      2850
      3870 presently owned
      Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

      Comment


        #4
        Yeesh. When I bought my '96 I crawled around and beat on everything with my fists even though it was a clearly well-maintained boat. You just never know.

        Comment


          #5
          i think he will tell the next owners. i hope.

          Comment


            #6
            dmcb wrote:
            hopefully the buyer gets a survey.

            If he doesn't disclose it he could be liable for repairs.

            Perfect example why we suggest a survey. Even on an older boat. You don't want to buy this problem even if you are spending only a few thousand on it. The repairs could exceed the cost of repair and the boat won't be worth any more. It is expected a boat being sold has a solid hull or you buy it knowing it needs repair.

            Doug
            Doug,

            Do you know of a law that requires a seller to divulge the history/problems with a boat buyer?

            Most states have this for selling a house but I haven't heard of it for boats.

            I bought mine in Florida. A year after I bought it I found where they did a mickey mouse coverup floor board repair under the new carpet. It cost me $250 plus 30 hour of labor.

            I thought boat sales were AS IS. Unless you find it going in, its yours.

            Chris

            Comment


              #7
              While you donÔÇÖt have a legal obligation to volunteer information about the boat, you also canÔÇÖt withhold known information about a defect. If an accident occurs, your failure to disclose may come back to haunt you and selling a boat "as-is" is not always protection. If possible, include mention of any problems or defects in the written contract.
              http://www.discoverboating.com/resou...cle.aspx?id=64

              May change from state to state.

              In this case with a hole poked in it, it would be difficult to say you didn't know.

              Bad position for the owner. The failure to get a survey (which would have showed a wet transom or its present condition) will prove to be an expensive mistake.

              Doug
              Started boating 1955
              Number of boats owned 32
              Bayliners
              2655
              2755
              2850
              3870 presently owned
              Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

              Comment


                #8
                Regardless of what the law says, the seller is open to a lawsuit for not revealing known defects. The problem is that it real easy to find some hungry lawyer who will represent you. Something as obvious as a hole poked into the transom cannot be dismissed as "did not know...".

                My friend sold a 21' larson cuddy. He wrote on the bill of sale as is. He took the new owner out for 2 hours teaching him about the boat and boating in general. Had him sign papers showing that the 2 hour run showed no problems with the boat.

                A few weeks later, the other guy guy call on the phone and said the lower unit was defective, and went bad. My friend went there and took pictures of it, showing a clear collision damage. He had pictures of the boat before, showing it was not damaged.

                He refused to pay. The other guy got a lawyer, and my friend went to his. It cost my friend 1/2 of the bill, to get out from under it. The lawyer recommended not going to court, as courts usually sided with buyers.

                Now, I have had some legal training for my business degree. I think that Uniform Commercial Code, which regulates sales, manufacturing, banking, etc, has a clause:

                "Warranty of fitness for general usage" and a few other which an attorney can use against you.

                My mother's attorney used this against an auto dealer (before present day lemon laws). The car would suddenly stall and not start again. The dealer replced a lot of assemblies. but failed to fix it. They had to give her another car.

                To the OP: your friend could get screwed royally if the transom lets go and the boat sinks, or people are injured.
                Captharv 2001 2452
                "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

                Comment

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