Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Replacing bilge pump-gctid383471

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Replacing bilge pump-gctid383471

    Splashed yesterday w/the annual "Spring Surprise" - this year it's a dead bilge pump. The Marina said they could replace it but would have to pull the engine. At $90/hour marine labor, I don't think so. I was able to remove the old pump w/a shorty screwdriver and some contortionism - plan to call Overton's for a replacement, as it's an old Johnson pump.

    I'm curious to know if any of you have replaced your bilge pump, espcially those of you who have or have had lilttle bowriders like mine that only need one bilge w/o the auto float deal?

    Thanks!

    #2
    Zebra Muscle wrote:
    Splashed yesterday w/the annual "Spring Surprise" - this year it's a dead bilge pump. The Marina said they could replace it but would have to pull the engine. At $90/hour marine labor, I don't think so. I was able to remove the old pump w/a shorty screwdriver and some contortionism - plan to call Overton's for a replacement, as it's an old Johnson pump.

    I'm curious to know if any of you have replaced your bilge pump, espcially those of you who have or have had lilttle bowriders like mine that only need one bilge w/o the auto float deal?

    Thanks!
    I would just get a new pump and install it. The fancy auto float ones are nice, but manually operated works fine too... just be sure to check your bilge every so often. I'd go with the auto if it was me... maybe buy a 2nd manually operated one for a backup?

    KC

    Comment


      #3
      I just spent a few hours this weekend adding a float sensor to my cheap factory bilge pump. Apparently the factory does not find an auto-bilge to be necessary. I do, however. If you do not have a sensor of some sort, it falls upon you to cycle the pump yourself to check for water. I don't like that idea at all.

      Good news is (and I well know tight bilge access...) you can buy bilge pumps that have floats built right in, and some designs that simply cycle every couple minutes to detect water. I would consider both of these a better solution than just replacing what you had one for one... On my 180, while bilge access isn't wide open, neither is there an engine in the way, so not only did I add a float switch to my factory pump, I'm also adding a second, higher volume bilge pump. I like redundancy, but also I do venture out into the Atlantic and Gulf waters, and it just adds a safety margin for me.

      Zebra Muscle wrote:
      Splashed yesterday w/the annual "Spring Surprise" - this year it's a dead bilge pump. The Marina said they could replace it but would have to pull the engine. At $90/hour marine labor, I don't think so. I was able to remove the old pump w/a shorty screwdriver and some contortionism - plan to call Overton's for a replacement, as it's an old Johnson pump.

      I'm curious to know if any of you have replaced your bilge pump, espcially those of you who have or have had lilttle bowriders like mine that only need one bilge w/o the auto float deal?

      Thanks!

      Comment


        #4
        I too have a bowrider (2006 195) and want to replace the standard bilge pump with a float switch of some sort. I have heard to stay away from the pumps with built in switch, but if I add separate switch I have no idea where to put it...

        Comment


          #5
          If you plan to moore this boat, add a new bilge pump of a larger capacity than thought needed. You cannot have a bilge pump that is too large.

          FYI: we have more trouble with the integral float switches than with the pumps that use a separate float switch.

          Say NO to these, and power your external float switch so that power to it cannot be turned off.

          Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/687018=27853-Manual OFF Auto bilge pump switch.jpg[/img]
          Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
          2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
          Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
          Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
          Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

          Comment


            #6
            A few boats ago, I ran into the dead bilge pump problem. It was so tight under the engine that I couldn't get the old one out, and I just left it there, and cut the wires off it. I installed a new pump and the ext float switch adjacent to the old pump but slightly more accessible. I would not consider leaving off the auto switch even though it takes two more hot wires to install. make sure you put the hot lead from the float switch directly to the + of the battery so that it is live at all times, and will cycle the bilge pump even with the key in the off pos.

            Comment


              #7
              To easily install a new pump under the engine, get a piece of aluminum a bit wider than the pump but long enough to slide under the engine.

              Install the pump on the aluminum and slide it under the engine.

              Now its easy to get to it to clean or replace if necessary.

              If you want a float switch, install it on the aluminum also.

              Of course you need enough hose and wire to allow removal.

              You might want to seal the old screw holes also.

              Doug
              Started boating 1955
              Number of boats owned 32
              Bayliners
              2655
              2755
              2850
              3870 presently owned
              Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

              Comment


                #8
                dmcb wrote:
                To easily install a new pump under the engine, get a piece of aluminum a bit wider than the pump but long enough to slide under the engine.

                Install the pump on the aluminum and slide it under the engine.

                Now its easy to get to it to clean or replace if necessary.

                If you want a float switch, install it on the aluminum also.

                Of course you need enough hose and wire to allow removal.

                You might want to seal the old screw holes also.

                Doug
                Great idea!
                Port: Sassafras River Georgetown, MD Bayliner 2000 2855 7.4

                http://www.chart.state.md.us/video/v...50fa36c4235c0a

                Comment


                  #9
                  msd58 wrote:
                  Great idea!
                  Just a thought... I thought mine was dead a few seasons back...but what happened, from sitting and drying out all winter it was just stuck... took it out, took apart the impellar part and lubed it up... still running strong...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    dmcb wrote:
                    To easily install a new pump under the engine, get a piece of aluminum a bit wider than the pump but long enough to slide under the engine.

                    Install the pump on the aluminum and slide it under the engine.

                    Doug
                    I used a piece of plastic the same way. Mine was cut from the top of one of those large rectangular plastic totes you can buy in any department store. It was rigid enough to hold up well, but flexible enough to lay down into the bottom of the bilge.

                    One thing, try to avoid drilling into the bottom of the hull if at all possible. Attach it to a bulkhead or stringer with a 90 degree bend or a piece of (stainless) angle iron or something. And be sure to use sealant in the holes before inserting the screws.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      when we got our boat, the P.O didnt care for it.. only one out of 4 bilges worked. and that sucker was working over time... we replaced all ours on our 3888.. didnt have to pull the boat, was easy fix for the Capt:arr to do. Finding the right ones here in town was the feat.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        dmcb wrote:
                        To easily install a new pump under the engine, get a piece of aluminum a bit wider than the pump but long enough to slide under the engine.

                        Install the pump on the aluminum and slide it under the engine.

                        Now its easy to get to it to clean or replace if necessary.

                        If you want a float switch, install it on the aluminum also.

                        Of course you need enough hose and wire to allow removal.

                        You might want to seal the old screw holes also.

                        Doug
                        Doug, you're not only good-lookin', but you're also one smart hombre!

                        GREAT idea!

                        thanks for sharing it

                        Sarah

                        Comment


                          #13
                          CaptTom wrote:
                          I used a piece of plastic the same way. Mine was cut from the top of one of those large rectangular plastic totes you can buy in any department store. It was rigid enough to hold up well, but flexible enough to lay down into the bottom of the bilge.

                          One thing, try to avoid drilling into the bottom of the hull if at all possible. Attach it to a bulkhead or stringer with a 90 degree bend or a piece of (stainless) angle iron or something. And be sure to use sealant in the holes before inserting the screws.
                          You really don't need to anchor it. It has enough weight to stay put and if it wants to move it will be toward the stern anyway.

                          Thanks Sarah. I have scheduled you for an eye exam 5/22/12 at 2 PM.

                          Doug
                          Started boating 1955
                          Number of boats owned 32
                          Bayliners
                          2655
                          2755
                          2850
                          3870 presently owned
                          Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Ended up simply pulling the old pump and installing a new one in about half an hour. Easier to install new than remove old, but no problems at all (and I am NOT mechanically inclined). Cost me about $35 w/parts and shipping - local Marina told me they would need to pull the motor to do the job. Glad I didn't give them the opportunity. :greedy_dollars:

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Zebra Muscle wrote:
                              Ended up simply pulling the old pump and installing a new one in about half an hour. Easier to install new than remove old, but no problems at all (and I am NOT mechanically inclined). Cost me about $35 w/parts and shipping - local Marina told me they would need to pull the motor to do the job. Glad I didn't give them the opportunity. :greedy_dollars:
                              Well, isn't that typical :thumb

                              And a little greedy...........

                              I am adding one myself - using Doug's idea on a piece of lexan plexi-glass. Going to leave the orig in place and wire this one to a different battery along with it's own outlet hose.

                              About $90 for the whole deal.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X