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    CO poisoning-gctid383181

    A while back, we were anchored in Silver Glen Springs, along with 2 other boats. There were a lot of other groups doing the same thing.

    On Sunday morning (Fathers day), I hear on my VHF "Help Coast Guard, anybody". Silver Glen is surrounded by 100' high trees, and radios (particularly cellphones) do not work. So, I answered and he reported a boat next to him had 2 deaths from CO poisoning. I have an external high gain cellphone antenna mounted on the boat, so I called 911 for them and relayed the info to the authorities.

    I asked the state for a copy of the official report.

    The state hired a CSI group to investigate the incident. Their findings:

    1. The three boats were anchored pependicular to the "wind", blowing across the beams.

    2. The victims boat , being on the downwind end, had a "mooring fender" between it and the center of the three boats

    3. All three had "camper canvas" up (station wagon effect)

    4. The center boat had a builtin genny, with its exhaust on the starboard side, causing its fumes (CO) to be trapped between it and the victims boat (mooring fender)

    5. (the biggie) the victims boat had the CO monitor wiring "ripped out" thus disabling the monitor. (The victims friends stated "it was making noise on a previous trip, so they disconnected it)

    The investigation concluded that all of the above , and the center boat with a properly installed builtin genny were the cause of the deaths. The official report did not mention an alcohol blood san, but we observed them to be partying the night before. Thats what you do at SIlver glen.

    The victims were educated people: the guy was a mechanical engineer, and the wife had a business degree.

    The "number cruncher" for that area is, and many of the numbers are estimates from my 25 years of going there, and maybe anchoring out over 100 times ( with no problems):

    The weekend anchor out averaged 75 boats overnight, many with gennys. ( In Florida, an air conditioner is not an option; its necessary) During week days, maybe an average of 10 boats.

    The last few years have a about 2/3 of what it was. Now, if one calculates the number of overnighters , it comes out to a couple of hunderd thousand overnight anchored outs.

    Besides the one above, the only other ones I heard about are: a houseboat with a defective exhaust on their genny, and another boat with unknown causes. So, statistically, its dam safe, provided you use some common sense. Note: all three were boats with built-in gennys.

    The purpose of this post is to alert you to the dangers of not using some common sense. Please dont turn this into a "I don't anchorout because..." versus the anchorouts.

    I observe the wind, currents, other boats in close proximity, and ask those close if they are going to run a genny and/or if they have a working CO monitor aboard. I'll move if I suspect a potential problem.
    Captharv 2001 2452
    "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

    #2
    When we bought our current 2452, the owner who stored it in his airplane hanger when no boating, got tired of the constant beeping of the CO detector so he pulled the power and left it hanging on the bulkhead.

    He was not aware that most smoke and CO detectors will beep constantly when they are not operable due to the sensor or something else inside not working to specs. That is your warning that the device needs to be replaced. They seldom last more than 5 years... Cheap insurance to replace when they do start to beep for "no reason".

    Like smoke detectors in our homes, when the warning shrill sounds, its time to replace the battery or the unit...

    Cheapest price for insurance you can find...
    Doug ;}
    MMSI: 338068776
    "Go Aweigh to" Photos < click on red letters... 2001 Bayliner 2452 w/6.2 HO (paid for)


    sigpic

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      #3
      Go Aweigh2452 wrote:
      When we bought our current 2452, the owner who stored it in his airplane hanger when no boating, got tired of the constant beeping of the CO detector so he pulled the power and left it hanging on the bulkhead.

      He was not aware that most smoke and CO detectors will beep constantly when they are not operable due to the sensor or something else inside not working to specs. That is your warning that the device needs to be replaced. They seldom last more than 5 years... Cheap insurance to replace when they do start to beep for "no reason".

      Like smoke detectors in our homes, when the warning shrill sounds, its time to replace the battery or the unit...

      Cheapest price for insurance you can find...
      I have one mounted in the galley over the sink.. its a dual type.. plug-in with a backup battery for when we arent running the gen or shore power.. it eats batteries fast, but well worth it since the boys stateroom is across from the galley and ours is front bow... we make sure all our apts have one.. required by the fire depts now here... we even got extra $ off insurance rates here.. just did my annual check with my agent

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        #4
        I have two on board. One in the cockpit and one in the main cabin.

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          #5
          telebob wrote:
          I have two on board. One in the cockpit and one in the main cabin.
          Same here.

          Another reason to have 2 is backup in case one does not work properly.
          Cheers, Hans
          2007 Carver 41 CMY
          Twin Volvo D6-370
          Montreal, Canada
          Midnight Sun I Photos

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            #6
            I know there has been discision regarding "marine" type CO detectors, but heres one from Home Depot thats battery operated and only costs $18. There is no reason not to have a couple on board.

            [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/687012=27852-CO Detector.jpg[/img]

            Comment


              #7
              CPSS wrote:
              I know there has been discision regarding "marine" type CO detectors, but heres one from Home Depot thats battery operated and only costs $18. There is no reason not to have a couple on board.

              http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg&#91;/img]
              I have 2 of these on my boat. My 3055 has a terrible station wagon effect and they do go off.

              Comment


                #8
                CPSS wrote:
                I know there has been discision regarding "marine" type CO detectors, but heres one from Home Depot thats battery operated and only costs $18. There is no reason not to have a couple on board.

                http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg&#91;/img]
                I have the same. I test it everytime I go out.
                1992 4588
                WitchWay

                Seadoo Wake 170

                Comment


                  #9
                  I have a household-type smoke/CO in the cabin and a CO-only in the cockpit. You really need to cover both areas, because the fumes can take totally different routes to either. Evidenced by the fact that I've had one or the other go off in certain wind conditions, but never both at once.

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