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Installing a 2nd bilge pump-gctid380768

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    Installing a 2nd bilge pump-gctid380768

    While reading Capt Sarah's unfortunate experience with her splash yesterday, the idea of a second bilge pump was briefly discussed. I have a question and didn't want to get off topic on her thread.

    So... If installing a second pump, do you need to install a second hose and thru-hull also? What about electrical? Maybe run it off a different fuse than the first pump? I just have the stock pump in my bilge, but I have a brand new shiney pump, that pumps out more gal per min than the stock pump, sitting in my garage. It's of little use there. What's the best way to install it. Tapping into the existing power supply and outflow hose would be the easiest, but something tells me that's not the best solution. At the sime time, Im not super excited about drilling through my hull. All thoughts are welcome.

    Thanks,

    John
    2003 Bayliner 305 - SOLD!
    Twin 5.7L, Carb'd, 445 hours
    Bravo II drives
    Closed-cooling

    #2
    cwiert wrote:
    While reading Capt Sarah's unfortunate experience with her splash yesterday, the idea of a second bilge pump was briefly discussed. I have a question and didn't want to get off topic on her thread.

    So... If installing a second pump, do you need to install a second hose and thru-hull also? What about electrical? Maybe run it off a different fuse than the first pump? I just have the stock pump in my bilge, but I have a brand new shiney pump, that pumps out more gal per min than the stock pump, sitting in my garage. It's of little use there. What's the best way to install it. Tapping into the existing power supply and outflow hose would be the easiest, but something tells me that's not the best solution. At the sime time, Im not super excited about drilling through my hull. All thoughts are welcome.

    Thanks,

    John
    .....quietly awaiting answers to this.......

    (and I'll betcha they include knocking a new hole in your hull)

    Comment


      #3
      Time to get out your hole saw kit.

      Use a separate electrical circuit, separate through hull.

      Drilling the your first hole in a perfectly good boat is like some other firsts in life.

      It'll be over with way quicker than you imagine; it will be less scary than you imagined, and practice will make perfect.

      KEVIN SANDERS
      4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
      www.transferswitch4less.com

      where are we right now?

      https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

      Comment


        #4
        I'm in the same boat you are in too...

        I'm going to keep my manually operated 350 gph bilge pump, and am going install an automatic bilge pump that's rated at 1100 or 1200 gph and drill another hole for the outlet...

        I think drilling thru the hull is scary too.... but at the same time.... kinda exciting!

        Comment


          #5
          ksanders wrote:
          Time to get out your hole saw kit.

          Use a separate electrical circuit, separate through hull.

          Drilling the your first hole in a perfectly good boat is like some other firsts in life.

          It'll be over with way quicker than you imagine; it will be less scary than you imagined, and practice will make perfect.
          Agreed

          Wire it off a different battery bank. My biggest pump is on the house bank, a 3700 GPH.

          Each pump has it's own discharge, all well above the water line grouped with the existing discharges.

          The hull side will be thinner than you expect. Use a hole saw.

          Set the pump and float up slightly higher than the existing pump. This to keep the second pump clean and in reserve.
          Jim McNeely
          New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
          Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
          Brighton, Michigan USA
          MMSI # 367393410

          Comment


            #6
            ksanders wrote:
            Time to get out your hole saw kit.

            Use a separate electrical circuit, separate through hull.

            Drilling the your first hole in a perfectly good boat is like some other firsts in life.

            It'll be over with way quicker than you imagine; it will be less scary than you imagined, and practice will make perfect.
            This will be my second hole I get to drill...in a boat that is. my first was for my GPSs transducer.

            Anyway, can I just run the electrical wires to a battery, since they are right there anyway? I don't think I need a Helm switch since my first pump is on a helm switch. This one will be just a backup and has the float switch on it, and I'll keep it a couple inches higher than the other one in the event the first pump fails or can't keep up with the water.
            2003 Bayliner 305 - SOLD!
            Twin 5.7L, Carb'd, 445 hours
            Bravo II drives
            Closed-cooling

            Comment


              #7
              I think that my second will be positioned to be my first ON tho.

              Presently the water gets deeper in there than I like it to be,,,,,,so in my case my existing will become the backup and the newbie will be mounted a bit lower.

              Hole Saw? That won't just destroy the fiberglass?

              Seems like a special drill needs to be used,,,,,,,no?

              Comment


                #8
                ksanders wrote:
                Time to get out your hole saw kit.

                Use a separate electrical circuit, separate through hull.

                Drilling the your first hole in a perfectly good boat is like some other firsts in life.

                It'll be over with way quicker than you imagine; it will be less scary than you imagined, and practice will make perfect.
                Ditto Kevin and Jim.

                If you install a nice looking thru hull fitting, no one will ever question it's existance.

                If this will be your largest bilge pump, it will serve as your emergency pump, and will be activated by a separate float switch that will be mounted at a higher elevation than the pumps lowest draw-down ability.

                This part is important! (please avoid bigle pumps with the integrated float switch! :thumb )

                You'll power the float switch from an Un-Interruptible source, such as your largest battery bank as Jim suggests.

                In most cases this will be your HLBB.

                Pick the power up from the rear of your MBSS terminal that connects to this battery bank.

                In many cases, this will be terminal #2.

                This avoids a direct battery connection.

                The "un-interruptible" portion of this means that the power to the float switch can never be accidentally turned off.... regardless of the MBSS position.

                No switch..... no Auto/OFF/On switch, etc!

                You can install a power switch to manually activate the pump, and there will no interferance with the float switch operation.

                .
                Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                Comment


                  #9
                  when both my engines were out for the fiberglass repairs and replacements of the drives...I went into the engine bay with the foreman and instantly remembered the pump trying to keep up with the incoming water....it's a 1500gph pump in the stern of my boat..so...after remembering that incident...I told the foreman to install another one in the fwd part of the engine bay...

                  as stated ..it needs to be on it's own dedicated service and hose....one pump tied to the main pump can overwhelm the water and blow it back into the engine bay....so...I wanted 2 pumps the original is on the switch to the helm...the 2nd is attached to the batt. on a dedicated circuit with fuseable link and it's own dedicated hull penetration and hose....it's an auto pump so..if the aft pump can't keep up...the fwd bilge pump will (hopefully) help out when/if the water gets that high.....

                  the only problem with bayliners hulls is they aren't exactly thick...so..you may have to build up the area with fiberglass to allow you to screw the mount to the hull...you don't want the pump bouncing around loose....

                  hope this helps...

                  :arr arr

                  Comment


                    #10
                    As a plumber that drills into fiber glass alot. When drilling with a hole saw I find it works best with the drill in reverse. It will keep the fiber glass for cracking / chipping and leaves a smooth hole too. Just food for thought

                    Comment


                      #11
                      M & M's wrote:
                      As a plumber that drills into fiber glass alot. When drilling with a hole saw I find it works best with the drill in reverse. It will keep the fiber glass for cracking / chipping and leaves a smooth hole too. Just food for thought
                      Thank You M&M

                      First post huh? Great,,,,,most people ask a question as #1.

                      YOU are helpful right outta the gate!

                      +1 to you

                      Sarah

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Seapuppy. A lot of todays pumps come with a mounting bracket. You can epoxy the bracket to the hull (you may have to make up a transition bracket out of plywood), and then attach the pump to the bracket. When, if, service is required, you can remoce the pump without removing the bracket. Saves putting screw holes where you don't want them.
                        Bob Hawes.
                        Kelowna, B.C.
                        1998 Trophy 2052 WA
                        4.3 Vortec, A1 G2

                        Comment


                          #13
                          2850Bounty wrote:
                          Ditto Kevin and Jim.

                          If you install a nice looking thru hull fitting, no one will ever question it's existance.

                          If this will be your largest bilge pump, it will serve as your emergency pump, and will be activated by a separate float switch that will be mounted at a higher elevation than the pumps lowest draw-down ability.

                          This part is important! (please avoid bigle pumps with the integrated float switch! :thumb )

                          You'll power the float switch from an Un-Interruptible source, such as your largest battery bank as Jim suggests.

                          In most cases this will be your HLBB.

                          Pick the power up from the rear of your MBSS terminal that connects to this battery bank.

                          In many cases, this will be terminal #2.

                          This avoids a direct battery connection.

                          The "un-interruptible" portion of this means that the power to the float switch can never be accidentally turned off.... regardless of the MBSS position.

                          No switch..... no Auto/OFF/On switch, etc!

                          You can install a power switch to manually activate the pump, and there will no interferance with the float switch operation.

                          .
                          This part is important! (please avoid bigle pumps with the integrated float switch!

                          Do tell, Rick! Why don'tcha like 'em?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            don't know why Rick doesn't like them but I hate their mechanical construction. Even though they have a screen to keep out dirt they WILL clog and then it's very difficult to clean them out. I had one in the last boat and ended up replacing it with a regular one and a separate float switch.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              M & M's wrote:
                              As a plumber that drills into fiber glass alot. When drilling with a hole saw I find it works best with the drill in reverse. It will keep the fiber glass for cracking / chipping and leaves a smooth hole too. Just food for thought
                              This is very good advise.
                              Jim McNeely
                              New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
                              Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
                              Brighton, Michigan USA
                              MMSI # 367393410

                              Comment

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