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docking a 2855

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  • builderdude
    replied
    I also have fenders, mid ship and stern lines at the ready. When solo and docking against wind or current my mid ship line is my priority line. With the mid ship line secured the boat can only articulate so far. Now I can secure the stern line, adjust the mid ship line and add a bow line if I feel it’s needed.

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  • Nickp
    replied

    Old thread but always a timely issue...

    I am in an East/West slip with North/South current backed in and Port to...wind is generally from SE to SW so it helps even when there is fowl current. In these conditions I have no problem docking the boat by myself. But when the wind is out of the North'ish and the current is flowing South that's when I sit on or in the boat and turn on the TV. There's no way I can hold a 38 beam to the wind and current...just sayin'...

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  • 706jim
    replied
    One concern about tying off the stern is that in a strong wind, the boat can weather vane away from the dock and potentially the drive(s) can contact the dock before you can get back to the helm. That said, a solution would be to tie this line with maybe 6-8' of play so that the drive would stay clear of the dock until you could get back to the helm to either power the boat against the dock or to grab the center or bow line. On my 246, I keep a 1/4" line attached to the bottom of the front fender so that it can be dropped into place when docking without having to walk onto the side deck trail. And it also allows this fender to be lifted up when I get underway. Docking a heavy boat with significant windage is a learned art.

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  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    It looks like we have resurrected an old thread from May of 2015... but here's my take.

    I do agree with Ted in that I do it very similar to what he does.

    Use longer than necessary dock lines. The lines need to be long enough to reach the cockpit area.
    Never use a bow line.... doing that that will get you into trouble.
    Use your mid ship cleat and your stern cleat for your lines.
    (if you decide that you want to use a bow line, you can always do that after you've tied off)

    Connect your lines long before you enter the marina.
    Run them from the cleats under the rail, up and over, and into your cockpit area. (for me, this would be at the flybridge)
    This ensures that the lines end up pulling directly against the cleats, and not from up/over the top of the rails.

    As said, have both lines in one hand while you are still at the controls.

    As you gently come to rest against the dock, climb down with the lines in hand.
    Once you've stepped foot onto the dock (with lines in hand), gently pull the hull in and tie off.



    This has worked well for me while docking single handed.



    .

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  • nwboater62
    replied
    I almost always dock alone. Line on the mid and stern ready to go, hop off with both in hand. I have lines set in my slip so I can hop off and slip them right on the cleats.

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  • johnep
    replied
    After years on my 2855 I found the best way to dock solo is to tie off a stern cleat. As someone said earlier. I have the swim platform so I can get on and off the boat easily. Tie it off, put the boat in forward and turn towards the dock, it gently moves to the dock and I can tie off the bow, then run my spring lines. Even in wind and tide it has not let me down. Just have to move faster some times!

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  • dmcb
    replied
    There are situations where you should not try docking without help.

    If you can't keep your boat against the dock for whatever reason long enough to get to the stern to secure it, well that might be one of the times.

    Securing the stern and powering the bow to the dock is a great way also. It could be a problem if you cannot get back to the helm in time to keep the bow in check. You don't want to be tied to the dock and have your boat 90 degrees away from the dock. A mid line tied with the stern might give you a little more time to get to the helm and keep your transom off the dock.

    Doug

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  • johnep
    replied
    "eewdoc" post=645126 wrote:
    I always try to tie off the stern line first, Easy to reach from inside the boat. then i turn the wheel into the dock and let it slowly power into the dock like a poor man's bow thruster.
    This sounds like it would work for me. I am docking alone 80% of the time. No one to grab a line or to help. Thanks again for all the input!

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  • LeePTI
    replied
    Tough to step off your boat when there is a strong current or wind blowing you off the dock. I bought a Landing Loop pole and a dock line with a 24" loop. Makes it easier for the Admiral to lasso a cleat when docking. Also helps me secure a mid cleat from the pilothouse when docking alone. Not a total solution, but may be a good option for you.

    http://www.landingloop.com/instructions.htm

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  • Shawnh
    replied
    "eewdoc" post=645126 wrote:
    I always try to tie off the stern line first, Easy to reach from inside the boat. then i turn the wheel into the dock and let it slowly power into the dock like a poor man's bow thruster.
    This how we dock our 3288. And you can tie off the stern line without stepping off the boat with a little practice. Then do as above to tie off the bowline. Shut off the engines, and set the lines as you need with no worry of losing the boat or falling in the drink.

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  • Davidlyne
    replied
    "dmcb" post=645095 wrote:
    Tie a mid or bow line and run it back to the stern. Have the stern line ready. You only need to get to the dock long enough to hand someone both lines or get off with both lines. You have complete control of the boat.

    Doug
    +1 I think it was one of Dougs posts that originally enlightened me on how to dock. Now we always do it this way

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I always try to tie off the stern line first, Easy to reach from inside the boat. then i turn the wheel into the dock and let it slowly power into the dock like a poor man's bow thruster.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    "dmcb" post=645095 wrote:
    Tie a mid or bow line and run it back to the stern. Have the stern line ready. You only need to get to the dock long enough to hand someone both lines or get off with both lines. You have complete control of the boat.

    Doug
    Yup, this is how I do it. Seems to be the best way. Mid cleat first, quick to the bow, stern last.

    Only problem is every now & then I nearly am pulled into the water -scary!

    What also helps is having the lines in your slip already waiting.

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  • johnep
    replied
    That's what I have been doing. With the tide running I don't have much time and am a bit concerned about being able to hold the boat against the tide. I may try going with the mid, stern, and then bow line tie off. Just wondering if others had success with that method. Thanks for the replies!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    "dmcb" post=645095 wrote:
    Tie a mid or bow line and run it back to the stern. Have the stern line ready. You only need to get to the dock long enough to hand someone both lines or get off with both lines. You have complete control of the boat.

    Doug
    Ditto

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