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    Sundeck pads-gctid369541

    Anybody know what kind of foam is use in these? I found a webite that sells all kinds of foam (thefoamfactory.com), just tossin around the idea of making my own and covering them...not feeling the 900 bill for a set of two pads...

    #2
    You want a foam that drains. Not all do.
    Jim McNeely
    New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
    Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
    Brighton, Michigan USA
    MMSI # 367393410

    Comment


      #3
      Couldnt a guy used some kind of closed cell foam? Then absorption wouldnt be a factor right?

      Comment


        #4
        Here's a link to some EZ Dry foam. http://www.onlinefabricstore.net/foa...FQaFhwod92IbZA

        Comment


          #5
          You could ask the Foam Factory which foam they sell will not absorb water and go for it.

          Comment


            #6
            I bought some cheap stuff at Walmart. Got a whole roll for $18. Will cover it in outdoor fabric and sew it up. For that price if it gets ruined I can easily and afford to replace them. My wife is up for the challenge of sewing them together - will even have a nice round pillow for head rest.

            Comment


              #7
              Impulse wrote:
              I bought some cheap stuff at Walmart. Got a whole roll for $18. Will cover it in outdoor fabric and sew it up. For that price if it gets ruined I can easily and afford to replace them. My wife is up for the challenge of sewing them together - will even have a nice round pillow for head rest.
              Im thinkin theres a market for this if shes up for it :greedy_dollars:

              Comment


                #8
                From the link

                Eva-Dri foam has an exploded open cell construction which allows liquids to flow right through, and humidity to rapidly evaporate, instead of acting like a moisture trapping sponge.

                ----------

                I have been to the FoamFactory in Michigan. They have a lot of products to choose from. Give them a call.

                I think you need open cell foam.
                Jim McNeely
                New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
                Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
                Brighton, Michigan USA
                MMSI # 367393410

                Comment


                  #9
                  No matter what you choose keep in mind you want to keep the bottom side open with a mesh type material so the cushion can breath or drain if required. Nothing will stand up to mother nature unless you make them out of fibreglass which is obviously very uncomfortable. Surveyors actually check humidity levels where sun pads are normally placed as water/humidity remains trapped there. The best way is to store them in the cockpit when you leave your boat, never leave them on the deck unless you are boating or at the dock enjoying the boat. Make them with the least amount of seams as possible and no pleats or fancy pillows as every crease prevents water run off and accumulates dirt/mould/mildew and every seam leaks water into the pad.My pillows are separate and get attached with velcro to the pad. My dock neighbour got a nice 32' Four Winns not that many years ago and I mentioned to him he should remove his pads when leaving, did not listen and ended up making new ones 2 years later and guess what? He now stores them in the cockpit when he leaves.Take a look at the picture below to see how I believe the ultimate sun pad should be made. As for foam, I let the guy who built them decide as I wanted something soft enough to be comfortable yet hard enough so you don't bottom out too easily. His choice turned out to be perfect.One last thing, Bayliner tends to seal the pad foam in light plastic similar to what they put over your suit at the cleaners. This is the worst mistake, as moisture will get in and once there it is trapped and I don't need to explain what happens then.

                  [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/673411=26287-P1000205.jpg[/img]
                  Cheers, Hans
                  2007 Carver 41 CMY
                  Twin Volvo D6-370
                  Montreal, Canada
                  Midnight Sun I Photos

                  Comment


                    #10
                    MidnightSun wrote:
                    No matter what you choose keep in mind you want to keep the bottom side open with a mesh type material so the cushion can breath or drain if required. Nothing will stand up to mother nature unless you make them out of fibreglass which is obviously very uncomfortable. Surveyors actually check humidity levels where sun pads are normally placed as water/humidity remains trapped there. The best way is to store them in the cockpit when you leave your boat, never leave them on the deck unless you are boating or at the dock enjoying the boat. Make them with the least amount of seams as possible and no pleats or fancy pillows as every crease prevents water run off and accumulates dirt/mould/mildew and every seam leaks water into the pad.My pillows are separate and get attached with velcro to the pad. My dock neighbour got a nice 32' Four Winns not that many years ago and I mentioned to him he should remove his pads when leaving, did not listen and ended up making new ones 2 years later and guess what? He now stores them in the cockpit when he leaves.Take a look at the picture below to see how I believe the ultimate sun pad should be made. As for foam, I let the guy who built them decide as I wanted something soft enough to be comfortable yet hard enough so you don't bottom out too easily. His choice turned out to be perfect.One last thing, Bayliner tends to seal the pad foam in light plastic similar to what they put over your suit at the cleaners. This is the worst mistake, as moisture will get in and once there it is trapped and I don't need to explain what happens then.

                    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]
                    Thank you sir for the advice. So attaching these pads, is is simply a matter of riveting some snaps to the deck?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      To do it right you need to screw down an awning track to the deck at the width of the front portion of the pad. http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...=%200&pID=2177 Then you need to sew in a awning welt to the lower from portion of the pad.http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...=%200&pID=2174 This allow the pad to slide into the attachment from the side and will never leave you flopping in the wind. If you look closely at my picture you will see a 1 1/2" flap/extention running from top to bottom on each side of the pads. Here I have installed just a few snaps however on the very last one at the top you will need to install a twist lock fastener as a snap will not hold up in high winds (ask me how I know) http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...cBrand=0&page=

                      If I give you more info I will have to build it for you.
                      Cheers, Hans
                      2007 Carver 41 CMY
                      Twin Volvo D6-370
                      Montreal, Canada
                      Midnight Sun I Photos

                      Comment


                        #12
                        MidnightSun wrote:
                        To do it right you need to screw down an awning track to the deck at the width of the front portion of the pad. http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...=%200&pID=2177 Then you need to sew in a awning welt to the lower from portion of the pad.http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...=%200&pID=2174 This allow the pad to slide into the attachment from the side and will never leave you flopping in the wind. If you look closely at my picture you will see a 1 1/2" flap/extention running from top to bottom on each side of the pads. Here I have installed just a few snaps however on the very last one at the top you will need to install a twist lock fastener as a snap will not hold up in high winds (ask me how I know) http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...cBrand=0&page=

                        If I give you more info I will have to build it for you.
                        These links and parts are very helpful. Much thanks!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          MidnightSun wrote:
                          To do it right you need to screw down an awning track to the deck at the width of the front portion of the pad. http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...=%200&pID=2177 Then you need to sew in a awning welt to the lower from portion of the pad.http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...=%200&pID=2174 This allow the pad to slide into the attachment from the side and will never leave you flopping in the wind. If you look closely at my picture you will see a 1 1/2" flap/extention running from top to bottom on each side of the pads. Here I have installed just a few snaps however on the very last one at the top you will need to install a twist lock fastener as a snap will not hold up in high winds (ask me how I know) http://www.jtstopshop.com/products/p...cBrand=0&page=

                          If I give you more info I will have to build it for you.
                          Ha, id be ok with that! :worth

                          Comment

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