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Need tips on what to do in an emergency-gctid366720

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  • boatworkfl
    replied
    If you take a USCG auxillary boating safety course you boat insurance co. will give you a discount.

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  • hfxjack
    replied
    Here is some good reading for those of you that have not taken a VHF radio course.

    http://www.mercator-publishing.com/i...mple_pages.pdf

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Here are some lessons I took away after surviving a fire in the engine room.

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  • cwiert
    replied
    seapuppy wrote:
    well..let me first say from experience...

    ...hope this all helps.......

    :arr arr
    Yes, Seapuppy, your experience definitely helped. Honestly, it was your story last year that even got me thinking about the "what ifs." Before that, I had the "ignorance is bliss" attitude. Reading your story was the first time I said to myself, "oh crap, what the hell would I do if that happened to me...i have no idea." And that was scary. So that's what kicked my butt into gear and started the learning process for me. And hopefully I can share what I've learned with others too. So if there's any good that came out of your unfortunate situation, hopefully this is it. Thanks for sharing your story and providing your input on what you learned from the experience.

    JimMc wrote:


    [SIZE]2 wrote:
    Regarding the Raymarine 53 radio



    [/SIZE]Raymarine had issues with the NMEA input being miswired on some Ray 53 radios. The sets with serial numbers of M108877 and higher are ok.

    It would be wise to check it.
    [/SIZE][/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT]
    Oh great. OK, I guess I'll be checking that the next time I get down to the boat. Thanks for the heads up.

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  • boatworkfl
    replied
    Safety checklist link.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...KnvKH06pV_nLUw

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  • Guest
    replied
    bump:arr
    ..........

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  • JimMc
    replied
    My current Uniden 625 Marine radio

    Lift the clear plastic protective tab over

    DISTRESS. If you momentarily press DISTRESS, the channel you were on at the time immediately changes to 16 and your power levelchanges to HI. If you hold down DISTRESS the radio beeps once per second. At the end of 5 seconds, a condition screen appears listing several distress condition choices. Rotate PUSH/SELECT to choose the appropriate distress condition or EXIT if you want to cancel.



    --------

    Regarding the Raymarine 53 radio



    Raymarine had issues with the NMEA input being miswired on some Ray 53 radios. The sets with serial numbers of M108877 and higher are ok.

    It would be wise to check it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    replied
    cwiert wrote:
    I did a lot of reading last night. GOod info. THanks to Pete for the link.

    My radio is DSC, so I will definitely be synching that up with my chartplotter. It looks like it's only 2 wires. Why didn't I do that before?! (i guess because i didn't know). I will also be requesting a MMSI# from BoatUs. I read up on how to input that number into the radio. And you're right, you have to depress the "Distress" button for 4 seconds. The radio will actually count down those 4 seconds on the display.

    That leads to a new question... What do you do first, a mayday call on Ch 16, or press the distress button? I'd think the distress button, because if I understand this correctly, when that button is pressed, the USCG will get all your vital info anyway from the MMSI# and will get a fix on your location from the chartplotter. Right? So why waste time with a mayday call and trying to convey that info over the air when the units can send them that info electronically, giving you more time to do other things, like untie the dink, or get your ditch bag and other gear in order.

    Lastly, if your radio is synched to the chartplotter, that should give the USCG your exact location, right? So then why would you need EPRIB? Just for redundancy?

    Thanks again,

    John
    well..let me first say from experience....depending on the radio....some will delay the broadcast 4 secs while others(ie mine) have a cover and will instantly respond and broadcast a signal......with that said....

    first remain calm..

    assess the situation

    make a determination can the boat be saved or should we abandon or call for help..(my first impression was dang...lets see where the water is coming from....dang...call help)...

    go to radio and don't even think about it...hit the button....the CG will come on air and say..."there has been a mayday broadcast from Bayliner Wild whim ..a 35 ft black and white bayliner location xyz by abc with unknown emergency..any vessel within reach please provide assistance.......at that point I broke in and said...mayday mayday mayday....this is wild whim....I've struck an unknown reef and taking on water...stbd engine dead with 2 people and 2 dogs on board...mayday mayday mayday......

    from there I had about 6 boats to my side as well as puget mike and virginia within minutes.......

    now...that is how I did it.....we were all wearing auto inflatables.......so I knew we wouldn't drown.....we don't own a dingy but will be seriously getting one installed this yr....I have the hand held radio but when your running around with your hair on fire trying to get people safe and not sink.....you don't have time to think....where is that danged radio.......have everything ready to grab and go....

    one thing to think about ...the boat won't be sinking instantly...you will have a few minutes to gather things....but.....install a huge bilge pump in the engine bay...if there's only one...install a 2nd fwd with direct operation off of a batt....with a float switch....I know people think I'm nuts but after seeing my drive hanging with a 4 in hole in the bellows....I know that the one bilge pump ain't enough....2 is better.....

    make sure all your flairs are current...have them accessable....along or in the ditch bag.....

    oh yeah...and go thru the mental drills in your head......

    personally I never knew how I'd react in an emergency like the one we had.........I hope I did ok.....we're still alive and nobody got thier little tootsies wet...

    hope this all helps.......

    :arr arr

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Good points here, but one has been missed. Smaller boats are foam filled and required to pass coast guard testing fully loaded with the plug out(swamped) and still be able to float and operate. Know if your boat has foam or not. It's not likely to sink if it does, so no need to abandon unless on fire or you've been run over by another boat and there is only pieces left, or it's disabled and heading for a dam, rocks, etc etc.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    When you hit the DSC emergency button, your radio switches to VHF channel 70 and transmits the MAYDAY on that frequency. Then it goes back to 16 and awaits an acknowledgement.

    If you're within VHF range of US or Canadian Coast Guard towers when you do this, CG will reply and get the particulars from you and then will begin broadcasting a MAYDAY relay for you. Their transmission is much more powerful and will be picked up by more vessels than you will reach using a ch16 broadcast.

    They will take time to share details, LAT/LON, etc with any responders, while you focus on gaining control of the situation.

    Note: many radios allow you to select an emergency type and that gets tagged onto the DSC message that is sent out.

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  • Go Aweigh2452
    replied
    What Mike said, hit the DSC first thing and all DSC capable boaters will get your emergency and position if they have it connected to a chart plotter. It is also good to call on ch 16 since other boaters that do not have DSC may be closer to you and can assist. Not everyone has DSC yet. So I would blanket my chances of rescue and use DSC, ch16 and if I had time, fire off a couple of flares skyward. No time then just do DSC plus ch 16.

    cwiert wrote:
    I did a lot of reading last night. GOod info. THanks to Pete for the link.

    My radio is DSC, so I will definitely be synching that up with my chartplotter. It looks like it's only 2 wires. Why didn't I do that before?! (i guess because i didn't know). I will also be requesting a MMSI# from BoatUs. I read up on how to input that number into the radio. And you're right, you have to depress the "Distress" button for 4 seconds. The radio will actually count down those 4 seconds on the display.

    That leads to a new question... What do you do first, a mayday call on Ch 16, or press the distress button? I'd think the distress button, because if I understand this correctly, when that button is pressed, the USCG will get all your vital info anyway from the MMSI# and will get a fix on your location from the chartplotter. Right? So why waste time with a mayday call and trying to convey that info over the air when the units can send them that info electronically, giving you more time to do other things, like untie the dink, or get your ditch bag and other gear in order.

    Lastly, if your radio is synched to the chartplotter, that should give the USCG your exact location, right? So then why would you need EPRIB? Just for redundancy?

    Thanks again,

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    cwiert wrote:
    I did a lot of reading last night. GOod info. THanks to Pete for the link.

    My radio is DSC, so I will definitely be synching that up with my chartplotter. It looks like it's only 2 wires. Why didn't I do that before?! (i guess because i didn't know). I will also be requesting a MMSI# from BoatUs. I read up on how to input that number into the radio. And you're right, you have to depress the "Distress" button for 4 seconds. The radio will actually count down those 4 seconds on the display.

    That leads to a new question... What do you do first, a mayday call on Ch 16, or press the distress button? I'd think the distress button, because if I understand this correctly, when that button is pressed, the USCG will get all your vital info anyway from the MMSI# and will get a fix on your location from the chartplotter. Right? So why waste time with a mayday call and trying to convey that info over the air when the units can send them that info electronically, giving you more time to do other things, like untie the dink, or get your ditch bag and other gear in order.

    Lastly, if your radio is synched to the chartplotter, that should give the USCG your exact location, right? So then why would you need EPRIB? Just for redundancy?

    Thanks again,

    John
    Activating the DSC emergency call also sends your distress to every DSC-equipped boater within VHF range. Their radio will show your LAT/LON to aid them in coming to you ASAP. And if they've got the feature on their electronics and properly hooked up, your position will appear right on their chart plotters too. This makes it simple to plot a course to your transmitted location.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Time will dictate what radio call you make- if you have time, you can do both. However, if you just took a torpedo on the bow from U-192, and you're going down fast, you may have time to just do 1- or none. Chance favors the prepared mind.

    EPIRB- if your boat gots down, and you're in your dinghy or swimming in a sea of debris, the EPIRB will continue to send out your position long after the boat has sunk, and you've drifted away from the initial position point

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  • cwiert
    replied
    JimMc wrote:
    I know the Ray 53 can be interfaced as I have had two of them.

    If a radio has DSC and an emegency button then it must have a NMEA input.

    You must program the radio with your MMSI #. You can get one free from Boat US. This is good for US water.

    If you will be travelling internationally get a FCC radio liscence and an MMSI from the FCC. This will be entered into an international database.

    Connect the NMEA out of your GPS/Plotter to the radio NMEA in. Be sure the GPS info is being accepted sometimes the settings need changed on the GPS output sentence.

    BTW - The DISTRESS button on most of the radios must be PRESSED AND HELD FOR 4 to 5 seconds. This is to eliminate false alarms.

    ----

    I second the comment on a EPIRB. I bought mine after the foot ball player were lost in the gulf a couple years ago. A top of the line is about $950 and a basic one can be had near $500.

    Like every thing you get what you pay for. The top of the line will issue your exact position Lat & Lon with it's very first broadcast and it shows your Lat & Lon so you can give them via your hand held radio. A basic one will ping an alert and it will need to be triangulated from 3 satellites to get a fix on your position.
    I did a lot of reading last night. GOod info. THanks to Pete for the link.

    My radio is DSC, so I will definitely be synching that up with my chartplotter. It looks like it's only 2 wires. Why didn't I do that before?! (i guess because i didn't know). I will also be requesting a MMSI# from BoatUs. I read up on how to input that number into the radio. And you're right, you have to depress the "Distress" button for 4 seconds. The radio will actually count down those 4 seconds on the display.

    That leads to a new question... What do you do first, a mayday call on Ch 16, or press the distress button? I'd think the distress button, because if I understand this correctly, when that button is pressed, the USCG will get all your vital info anyway from the MMSI# and will get a fix on your location from the chartplotter. Right? So why waste time with a mayday call and trying to convey that info over the air when the units can send them that info electronically, giving you more time to do other things, like untie the dink, or get your ditch bag and other gear in order.

    Lastly, if your radio is synched to the chartplotter, that should give the USCG your exact location, right? So then why would you need EPRIB? Just for redundancy?

    Thanks again,

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • hfxjack
    replied
    ksanders wrote:
    If you are in a emergency, in this case a flooding that you've determined you cannot control...

    While everybody is donning lifejackets...

    First, call on channel 16 a mayday. Do this first because you'll very quickly flood the batteries and loose the ability to call for help.

    This procedure is simple, and you need to practice it.

    MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY MY POSITION IS xxx WE ARE SINKING

    Repeat this at least twice. This should start a very short radio conversation with the nearest USCG station. Then you KNOW help is on the way.

    Grab the ditch bag, get in your skiff if you have one, and then set off your EPIRB

    If you do not have an EPIRB buy one. They're cheap and would have saved the life of the Texas boater that died.
    I printed colour coded laminated and attached the three calls to the radio mik. Also included a brief explanation of their use.

    Hello Hello is not one of the calls :kidding

    Leave a comment:

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