Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Compliance Notice or Capacity rating for a 1994 Bayliner 3055-gctid365649

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Compliance Notice or Capacity rating for a 1994 Bayliner 3055-gctid365649

    I was hoping that someone could help me in verifying the vessel tonnage and also the max. number of persons on board rating for this boat. We have a requirement up here in the great white north that the manufacturers have a Canadian Compliance notice affixed to the vessel with this information and I do not have this on my boat as it likely was sold in the U.S before ending up here.

    Any information at all would be helpful as I need this for the MMSI application.

    Thanks

    #2
    Vessels of this size do not require a capacity placard in the US.

    I would count the number seated passangers you could have in the cockpit and call that the number.

    My 2004 305 would seat 8 maximum. I don't think we have ever had that many aboard. "I" would not go beyond 8 that's for sure.
    Jim McNeely
    New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
    Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
    Brighton, Michigan USA
    MMSI # 367393410

    Comment


      #3
      As Jim said, it was not required. The boat dry was 8,000lbs according to Bayliner. This is just a guess but in theory the capacity is propably in the teens given that a 22' open bow can be 10-12. Now personally I would never put that many in a 22' boat, or that many on mine but the ratings are very high IMO.
      Phil, Vicky, Ashleigh & Sydney
      1998 3055 Ciera
      (yes, a 1998)
      Previous boat: 1993 3055
      Dream boat: 70' Azimut or Astondoa 72
      Sea Doo XP
      Sea Doo GTI SE
      Life is short. Boats are cool.
      The family that plays together stays together.
      Vice Commodore: Bellevue Yacht Club

      Comment


        #4
        I believe Coast Guard requires capacity plates only on boats under 19 feet. Above that might be manufactuers suggested capacity. In most cases, passenger capacity is much higher that practical capacity. Just this past summer I witnessed 12 people that I could see on a Bayliner 2450 anchored out for fireworks. Looked like a clown car!

        Comment


          #5
          ÔÇóLook for a capacity plate near the operator's position or on the transom of the boat. This plate indicates the maximum weight capacity and/or the maximum number of people that the boat can carry safely in good weather.

          ÔùªYou should not exceed either the stated maximum weight capacity or the maximum number of people.

          ÔùªMaximum weight is the combined weight of passengers, gear, and motors.

          ÔùªIn many states, it is a violation to exceed capacity.

          ÔÇóFederal law requires single-hull boats less than 20 feet in length to have a capacity plate. (However, PWC and sailboat manufacturers are not required to attach a capacity plate.) Always follow the recommended capacity found in the owner's manual and on the manufacturer's warning decal. Never exceed these capacity recommendations.

          On boats with no capacity plate, use the following rule of thumb to calculate the number of persons (weighing 150 lbs. each, on average) the boat can carry safely in good weather conditions.

          Number of people = boat length (ft.) x boat width (ft.)15For example, for a boat 18 feet long by 6 feet wide, the number of persons is 18 times 6 (or 108) divided by 15, which equals seven 150-lb. persons (or a total person weight of 7 x 150, or 1050 lbs.).

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks everyone for your comments, it is weird Canadian thing but I alsp found out that Transport Canada which also regulates all things marine here, is not so hung up on having this affixed any longer. They used to supply this if not equipped but it is now up to all manufacturers to have this attached on all vessels and it is really only required if used for commercial purposes, no longer a mandatory thing if used for pleasure use only. I still think that this still happens on new boats sold in Canada whatever the size of vessel.

            That said, common sense would dictate no more that what can be seated as was stated (8 -10) but If there are any pre 2000 Canadian 3055 owners out there with one of these affixed, I sure would like to know what their plate reads just for my own sake.

            Thanks much,

            Frode

            Comment


              #7
              I would think that you would not want more than 8-10 on the boat for an onboard venture for a day trip, (personally more than 6 with the captain and spouce would be a pain in the butt if fishing); if going to a beach and some stay on the beach overnight then you could carry more, but remember, you must have life jackets for each person on board; in the US there are age limits where the life jacket must be worn at all times while on deck.

              In Seward AK we have 6 paid passenger charter boats that are 24' that do quite well for fishing, but there are rules; for family, there are sqabbles ," I want to fish first, I want that side of the boat, he caught the last fish" that even occurs on charter boats.

              Always with a large family group set the rules prior to any agreement to let the person onboard, It can be a really fun trip with a large group if it is staged properly.

              The captain is in charge of the boat, the admiral keeps the peace.

              It is not so much how many you can carry, but how many you can safely carry!

              A bit long winded, but that is my experience, and from others in our harbor I have listend to, I love it on the water, it is so peasefull, even when I was chartering.

              My most wonderfull experience was on a charter while on the way to my fishing area, I saw a whale, we could not figure out why the whales fin was splaching so much, well, it was a whale giving birth, after the berth the whale came with-in 50 ft of my boat and eyeballed us, then moved on, that was the day my camara died.
              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
              Twin 350 GM power
              Located in Seward, AK
              Retired marine surveyor

              Comment


                #8
                Lazy D 88 wrote:


                On boats with no capacity plate, use the following rule of thumb to calculate the number of persons (weighing 150 lbs. each, on average) the boat can carry safely in good weather conditions.

                Number of people = boat length (ft.) x boat width (ft.)15For example, for a boat 18 feet long by 6 feet wide, the number of persons is 18 times 6 (or 108) divided by 15, which equals seven 150-lb. persons (or a total person weight of 7 x 150, or 1050 lbs.).
                My 305 numbers rounding down.

                30 long x 10 Wide = 300 / 15 = 20

                20 People on board would be nutz.

                I can feel the difference between 2 and 5 on board in the boats handling.

                I will stick with the number of places to sit in the cockpit as my line in the sand. So Jim's limit is 8.

                ----------

                To have twenty on board.

                8 in the cockpit

                3 in forward berth.

                3 on cabin settee

                3 in aft berth

                1 in the head

                2 behind the boat pushing
                Jim McNeely
                New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
                Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
                Brighton, Michigan USA
                MMSI # 367393410

                Comment


                  #9
                  I believe if you look just below the throttle you'll see that the seal says the 3055 has a yacht classification and therefore the number of people allowed on board is limited to how many you feel could be safely aboard providing they all have life jackets.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X