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    #31
    What do you plan on using for the door itself? I have seen some made from Starboard with good results. Of course there is the old fiberglass wrapped marine plywood version too. On the PO had a guy kind of copy to method on the method used on the 3288. It need a bit more work for it to fit like it should, since the PO worker literally died before he finished the job. The PO was getting a bit miffed that his calls were not being returned and that the guy never showed up to finish the job, until one day his widow answered the phone. Then the PO felt really bad about it. That was just one of "those things that can happen".

    Don't say your goin' to get a transom door if it kills you...





    Greg


    Attached files

    Newport, Oregon
    South Beach Marina
    1986 3270 with twin 110 HP Hino diesels. Name of boat "Mr. Darcy"
    Past work history: Prototyping, tooling, and repair for Reinell,. General fiberglass boat repair starting in 1976.
    Also worked as heavy equipment mechanic, and machinery mechanic for over 30 years.

    Comment


      #32
      I used a Sawzall



      Note if.you plan on using the cut-out as the door you cannot square up the sides or the door won't open or close. The far side from the hinge has.to be angled.





      It's not that difficult to but it is alot of work. You need to add supports for the transom grind it well.

      I used a Sawzall because there will probably be a certain amount of free hand cutting. I rounded.my corners but square would be easier. I'm placing a starboard door but plan in the future using the cut out piece for making a door. That's probably the most work. Thus a star board plastic door would be much easier.

      I have done a lot of research regarding this. I also used to do glass work for a living. Let it be known there are many ways to do this some with support coring some without. I've seen some that have made stainless supports and some with none at all and not even glassed just enclosed in wood or starboard. It's my opinion that an internal support of wood glued in with epoxy and glassed over to be best but yes it's more work. Nothing done right comes easiest.


      Attached files

      1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
      twin 454's
      MV Mar-Y-Sol
      1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
      Twin chevy 350's inboard
      Ben- Jamin
      spokane Washington

      Comment


        #33
        You should also do internal stringers for support of the transom. Sometimes because of things on the inner transom its not possible to do much but chose a location that allows for that. You may have to relocate something like trim tab pump and so on.







        Outline it first with tape. Then cut


        1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
        twin 454's
        MV Mar-Y-Sol
        1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
        Twin chevy 350's inboard
        Ben- Jamin
        spokane Washington

        Comment


          #34
          The cut also may have some corning of foam you will have to deal with .



          For mine I had some double walling to deal with so it became a little.more complicated. I know there were easier was.to do it but this is what I wanted to do. Newer boats have a different configuration and make it easier to do it.







          I haven't finished it yet.so no final pics . It got too cold in my shop to do glass work. It hasn't been until now that it's been warm enough
          1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
          twin 454's
          MV Mar-Y-Sol
          1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
          Twin chevy 350's inboard
          Ben- Jamin
          spokane Washington

          Comment


            #35
            That looks like a nice project, I like employing part of the exterior and interior fiber glass so it blend in.




            Picture of my competed door.
            Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
            96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

            Comment


              #36
              "yachtman" post=801887 wrote:
              The cut also may have some corning of foam you will have to deal with .

              [attachment]34957 wrote:
              20160318_123210.jpg[/attachment]

              For mine I had some double walling to deal with so it became a little.more complicated. I know there were easier was.to do it but this is what I wanted to do. Newer boats have a different configuration and make it easier to do it.

              [attachment]34958 wrote:
              20160318_123051.jpg[/attachment]

              [attachment]34959 wrote:
              20160311_185324.jpg[/attachment]

              [attachment]34960 wrote:
              20160311_185353.jpg[/attachment]

              I haven't finished it yet.so no final pics . It got too cold in my shop to do glass work. It hasn't been until now that it's been warm enough
              I did mine very similarly to yours. Only difference was I left about an inch of a "stoop" on the transom, I guess to keep items from rolling out the back. In retrospect I should have gone flat...that way the cockpit drains would be irrelevant.

              Sawzall did the trick in about 20 minutes. Oscillating tool is a toy, it would probably take two days to do it with one of those.
              Esteban
              B-ham!
              Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

              Comment


                #37
                "green650" post=801899 wrote:


                Sawzall did the trick in about 20 minutes. Oscillating tool is a toy, it would probably take two days to do it with one of those.
                Not sure which brand you tried or what types of blades you used but mine rips through glass pretty quick and leaves a very clean edge too. It does however take its damn time if there's any plywood coring to get through :silly:
                Dave
                Edmonds, WA
                "THE FIX"
                '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                Misc. projects thread
                https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                Comment


                  #38
                  What i liked about the Sawzall was I used a long blade and was.able to cut through all the walls at the same time. I didn't have to calculate what was on the other side and all the lines matched up because they were all cut through at the same time.

                  I think though if you are uncomfortable with that then use something else. As far as dust the Sawzall

                  dust is in bigger chunks and doesn't fly all over. The other tools make much finer particles .

                  You do have to remember to watch the other end of the long blade to make sure it's where it belongs.

                  After all its just fiberglass it can be fixed if it gets messed up.
                  1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
                  twin 454's
                  MV Mar-Y-Sol
                  1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
                  Twin chevy 350's inboard
                  Ben- Jamin
                  spokane Washington

                  Comment


                    #39
                    "yachtman" post=801908 wrote:
                    What i liked about the Sawzall was I used a long blade and was.able to cut through all the walls at the same time. I didn't have to calculate what was on the other side and all the lines matched up because they were all cut through at the same time.

                    I think though if you are uncomfortable with that then use something else. As far as dust the Sawzall

                    dust is in bigger chunks and doesn't fly all over. The other tools make much finer particles .
                    Exactly.

                    I cut through the teak cap, aluminum rub rail, wood, and 3 separate panels of glass all in one shot. Then I hit it with an 8" grinder with 80 grit sanding wheel to square it all up and make the radius I liked. All edges need to be ground significantly to feather edge for glass overlay so I do not know why you would want to waste all day trying to make a pretty cut.
                    Esteban
                    B-ham!
                    Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

                    Comment


                      #40


                      I have yet to make a door for mine. I will probably go with star board. The ones that are made to match the transom look way to clunky to me. If I remember correctly, just under the glass cap under the teak, there is about 1 inch thick wood sandwiched in glass so that was a little tough to get through even with a 10 inch blade on my sawzall.
                      Esteban
                      B-ham!
                      Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

                      Comment

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