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How to Escape My Slip ?!-gctid363682

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    BLCarl wrote:
    Sara

    No photos in this computer but I think I have one someplace. There was one of mine on the superfinn web site.

    I have the B2 drive so it may be a little different but I think they are similar. As long as you have enough space between the prop and the outdrive cavitation plate to mount the WF under the cavplate instead of above. I had to change the Zinc to the flat type so the WF would sit flat under the cavplate. I moved the WF as close as I dared to the prop so the cutout in the plate would be closer to the thickest part of the caveplate. I used a few C clamps to position and hold the WF to the underside of the cavplate. When I got it exactly where I wanted it I drilled from above through the existing holes in the drive cavplate into and through the WF then attached it with stainless bolts large OD flat washers.

    I think the problem with the damaged cavplate in the other thread might have been trying to tighten it too tight, trying to get one to conform to the other. The main plate on my twin finn it much thicker than the B2 cavplate so if it were unsuported with spacers the drive cavplate would crack first if over tightened. In my view attaching the finn to the top of the cavitation plate near it's thinest sections with screw is risky because it's only being supported by 4 screws pulling up on the thin material. When mounted to underside the screws are just keeping the WF in place and all the upward pressure is distributed across the entire underside of the cavplate.

    I hope this long winded explination of my thinking on the subject makes sence I'll look for the photo if you need it.
    Yes, it does

    I'll take another look with fresh eyes at WF,,,,,Thank You, Carl !

    Much appreciated - thanks for the detailed directions

    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • BLCarl
    replied
    LazyCrusr wrote:
    hi Carl

    Can you possibly elaborate or maybe take a pic of this?

    I too bought a Wanderfin but now have noticed that the mounting surfact - cavitation plate - is not straight. That means that the WF and the plate don't have nice, flat surfaces to mount with. Instead my cavitation plate is kinda curved. Not good
    Sara

    No photos in this computer but I think I have one someplace. There was one of mine on the superfinn web site.

    I have the B2 drive so it may be a little different but I think they are similar. As long as you have enough space between the prop and the outdrive cavitation plate to mount the WF under the cavplate instead of above. I had to change the Zinc to the flat type so the WF would sit flat under the cavplate. I moved the WF as close as I dared to the prop so the cutout in the plate would be closer to the thickest part of the caveplate. I used a few C clamps to position and hold the WF to the underside of the cavplate. When I got it exactly where I wanted it I drilled from above through the existing holes in the drive cavplate into and through the WF then attached it with stainless bolts large OD flat washers.

    I think the problem with the damaged cavplate in the other thread might have been trying to tighten it too tight, trying to get one to conform to the other. The main plate on my twin finn it much thicker than the B2 cavplate so if it were unsuported with spacers the drive cavplate would crack first if over tightened. In my view attaching the finn to the top of the cavitation plate near it's thinest sections with screw is risky because it's only being supported by 4 screws pulling up on the thin material. When mounted to underside the screws are just keeping the WF in place and all the upward pressure is distributed across the entire underside of the cavplate.

    I hope this long winded explination of my thinking on the subject makes sence I'll look for the photo if you need it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Is r slip covered? If so tie a rope (line...stringy thingy) overhead to the port side...then you can pull yourself over whileclose to the helm and hit throttle when needed..then just let go of the overhead line...even tie a decoration to it so they don't say anything. If not covered then disregard this as a bad idea cuz rope don't tie good to sky.

    Leave a comment:


  • boatworkfl
    replied
    boatommy wrote:
    My point was, if the boat is pinned to the dock because of wind or drift, there is no reason to worry about keeping the boat tied to the dock.

    That is one less thing to worry about.
    I missed your point, sorry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    boatworkfl wrote:
    You do not always have a choice where you dock your boat in a marina, sometimes a marina will allow you to move to another slip if availible.
    My point was, if the boat is pinned to the dock because of wind or drift, there is no reason to worry about keeping the boat tied to the dock.

    That is one less thing to worry about.

    Leave a comment:


  • Four_Pyrates
    replied
    IS this dock a floating dock? Is there another boat next to you? How far from the dock to the shoreline and how deep? The getaway isn't that difficult, but most people think that turning the boat to port (left) is correct and that isn't necessarily so. Until you clear the stern, going to port is not going to work. If you ease out of the slip with a slight turn to starboard (right) until you clear the stern, you should drive right out and not tap the hull on the dock. As soon as you clear the dock pilot your boat straight ahead until you are making a little way and then turn the wheel hard to port while increasing power to make the turn. It is the old message of taking what the sea gives you and work with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • 706jim
    replied
    LazyCrusr wrote:
    Is there a weekend rate?
    $200.00

    Leave a comment:


  • boatworkfl
    replied
    boatommy wrote:
    If the wind is pushing the boat to the dock, why is everyone concerned with keeping the boat tied to the same dock?
    You do not always have a choice where you dock your boat in a marina, sometimes a marina will allow you to move to another slip if availible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    If the wind is pushing the boat to the dock, why is everyone concerned with keeping the boat tied to the same dock?

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Buckaneer wrote:
    I have see this done... a friend made a bracket to CLAMP a wheel to the dock... it worked!

    or I will come and sit on your dock for $100.00/day, and push your boat off when you need it..:kidding

    How about the BIG ball bumper the size of a basket ball..... ??

    BUCKANEER

    :arr
    Is there a weekend rate?

    Leave a comment:


  • rafaelfigueira
    replied
    LazyCrusr wrote:
    This is good stuff!

    And your MS Paint skills are not to be denied
    +1000! Those trees in the background are picture perfect. Amazing Paint skills.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This is good stuff!

    And your MS Paint skills are not to be denied

    Thanks ALL

    Sarah

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I have see this done... a friend made a bracket to CLAMP a wheel to the dock... it worked!

    or I will come and sit on your dock for $100.00/day, and push your boat off when you need it..:kidding

    How about the BIG ball bumper the size of a basket ball..... ??

    BUCKANEER

    :arr

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I often untie and dock alone. I too have a cross wind that can make it troublesome. I have got a lot better at backing in by giving myself lots of drift room, keeping the space tight and knowing when to abort the mission and try again. My only pride is to dock without too much trouble, so if it takes me three tries, it takes me three tries. I do the same in my car - i never figured out why boaters think they need to dock perfectly on the first try every time - but that's another thread likely.As for leaving solo, I installed a steel leg-bolt with a ring into my dock right about in center of my forward cleat and rear cleat (on the boat). I start my boat and let it warm up with all the lines attached. When I'm ready to leave I untie everything except the one rope that goes from my front cleat, through the ring to the rear cleat. It makes a "v" shape. It provides enough stability for me to get back in the boat and at the helm. Once I'm ready, I take a step back from the wheel, untie the rear cleat and give the throttle a small amount of forward thrust with the wheel turned slightly into the wind, just enough to push me away from the slip and not drift toward land. The rope slides through the ring and drags in the water until i'm free and clear, then I collect it once i'm away from the other boats. It is NOT long enough that it would or could get caught in the drive.I used my superior MS Paint skills to show generally what I'm talking about.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/667139=25714-dock line.JPG[/img]

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  • iceclimber
    replied
    Sara I can understand keeping to yourself as a single (by choice) female Captain; although I would hope the local admirals would be social? On our docks, even if we are not social with other folks - people line up to help for departure and docking. Anyway, my suggestion is it's time to move up to a twin engine boat ! If that is not in the cards the bow thruster suggestion is a great one, but dang those things are expensive. Even with a boat that turns on a dime, I hate high winds. If it's too windy, it is BBQ and a docktail for my crew.

    Leave a comment:

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