Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Brutal Honest Answers Needed-gctid362127

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Brutal Honest Answers Needed-gctid362127

    As you know I am looking into a cruiser, but I just had a revelation, I am too big / unbalanced / clumsy / fill in the blank here to walk across the cabin to get to the anchor and bow cleat. Now, other than the obvious (lose lots of weight and take ballet) how do you cruiser folk get out to the anchor? Do you need to go out there for docking? Do you have any tricks to keep from falling off and being on someone's You-Tube video? Help! This may alter my existence totally.

    #2
    Most small cruisers have a bow hatch. Assuming you can fit through the hatch you could stand in the hatch and play out your anchor.

    Comment


      #3
      I always tie the bow line to a spot close to where i get off the boat because i dock by myself alot.keep it tight coming from the bow so it doesnt drag in the water then untie it when you get to the dock. as far as the anchor i have a lot of handrails and i just take my time. o yeah if you are nervous wear a lifejacket as you could hit your head. i do beleive you can install windlass controls in the cabin area

      Comment


        #4
        You hold on to hand rails and walk on gunwales to get to the bow. Wear PFD, I have not fallen off yet.

        Comment


          #5
          hmm, There's a scary visual, I tried that and got stuck. I put my arms up as signaling a touchdown, stood up and got up about 8 inches before feeling like I was getting stuck. I am 320# @ 5' 4"

          Scary wrote:
          Most small cruisers have a bow hatch. Assuming you can fit through the hatch you could stand in the hatch and play out your anchor.

          Comment


            #6
            The boat I looked at had rails down the sides but when I shook them (from being on the ground) they moved about 2 to 3" in either direction. A windlass sounds good, do you need to secure the anchor while moving?

            jamie mac wrote:
            I always tie the bow line to a spot close to where i get off the boat because i dock by myself alot.keep it tight coming from the bow so it doesnt drag in the water then untie it when you get to the dock. as far as the anchor i have a lot of handrails and i just take my time. o yeah if you are nervous wear a lifejacket as you could hit your head. i do beleive you can install windlass controls in the cabin area

            Comment


              #7
              As in hang over the edge of the boat ?!?!!?!?!?! Wow, I am really thinking on that weight loss program

              GrindKore wrote:
              You hold on to hand rails and walk on gunwales to get to the bow. Wear PFD, I have not fallen off yet.

              Comment


                #8
                I often leave my bow line for docking/mooring tied to the bow cleat and bring the other end into the cockpit and tie it off to something until ready to be used...works well when docking solo

                As for anchoring, if you dont already have a windlass, I would consider one, along with installing controls at the helm I have this setup and would not go with out it...It is common practice to tie off the anchor incase of acidental deployment (not absolutly neccessary but I recomend it), maybe you can do that through the hactch or install a safety switch (swithch to power windlass switch) that cuts some risk of tangling your rode in your prop!

                Another option is to bring someone capable/helpful along...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hey welcome to the clumsy club! I am 6'4" 250 but always clumsy as hell. I fell off my old boat one time- pulling up the anchor. Authorities suspect alcohol was involved.

                  I love my windlass.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I'm not sure if you are asking about anchoring or docking.

                    If anchoring, and since you mentioned Windlass, that is certainly an option.

                    Be very aware and very cautious as to aviod a poor Windlass installation.... the Windlass operation should be as "hands-free" as posible, and this means that the layout and installation must be correct.

                    If docking, you will not be using a bow cleat. Instead, you'll be using mid-ship and stern cleats.

                    .
                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Good one Brad!

                      I'll say that it does get a little hairy and I'm small.

                      A windlass would be my dream

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Just a word of caution. The windlass is a VERY handy device but does not eliminate the need to be able to get to the anchor quickly. If there is a problem with the windlass or if there is a ton of vegetation stuck on the anchor/chain, you WILL need to have access to the anchor. A good walk-around design would be necessary if you are having trouble accessing the bow using the hatch.

                        I know you are looking at cabin cruisers, but here is another option. There are enclosed pontoon boats (not necessarily houseboats) that have easy access to the bow. Both anchoring and docking are much easier with these boats. The only drawback is that they are intended for use in protected waters.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Ill be brutally honest....... as coming from some one who used to be a weight loss counselor and used to be over weight somore so than I am now. Boating is a physical activity. Just because you have a windlass doesn't mean you sit at the helm and drop anchor. You still have to be able to secure the anchor when it's been dropped. Then you have to secure it when you bring it up. This means you are going to have to be able to go up front bend over/kneel down and lock down the anchor rode or anchor. What if the windlass fails? You will still need to be able to deal with that. If its a medium size cruiser then the front hatch wont be close enough to reach the windlass. You probably wont be comfortable in a small cruiser..

                          The next thing is you will need to be able to go up front at your size you will need to find a boat that has a space wide and strong enough for you to pass. You wont find that in a small cruiser. As some one that can hardly fit my fat butt through a boat hatch then at 5'9" and 200 lbs I am going to guess that going through a hatch will not be an option.

                          Now there is the aspect of safety. If you tried to go forward and you fell in for any reason for that matter how would you get in the boat? Have you ever tried to get up those pitiful swim platform ladders? You would need to solve that problem. Make sure you get a better ladder and install a handle or rope to be able to get back in the boat.

                          Your best bet is going to be take some one with you physically able to help. Find a boat that allows you to do what you need safely. And you said it lose weight but that is always easier said than done.

                          EDIT...I don't want to be the one to discourage you. One of the best things you could do is get out on the water enjoy it and be more active. Find a boat that works for you and learn how to manage what you need to to get the job done. Its just that currently you will struggle but that doesn't mean you can't do it.

                          Also I hesitate to say (not always a good.idea)this but you could as longs as it was in protected waveless non tidal area you could anchor from the rear of the boat. As long as there was no bad weather. You would have to pull anchor manually but hen that wont be too bad.
                          1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
                          twin 454's
                          MV Mar-Y-Sol
                          1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
                          Twin chevy 350's inboard
                          Ben- Jamin
                          spokane Washington

                          Comment


                            #14
                            usually around the gunnels or threw the front window, windlass does rock

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Two items to consider

                              1) when I am living aboard I find that the extra activity has caused me to feel great and to easily lose weight - mind you, it came back on just as easy this winter. So don't hesitate,boating is good for you

                              2) a little larger cruiser (to a point) (32 or so) may be actually easier to handle not only because it is more stable but also because of the wider side walkways. I think the advice which has been offered on the use of PFDs when outside of the cockpit or sedan has merit - the Admiral and I both have inflatables which are comfortable and are the way to go and yes a ladder is important. Some sailboat folks even use life lines although I have yet to see them on powerboats.

                              BTW the posters comment on working outside (or even complying with the call of nature) and falling overboard under the affluence of incohol is not to be ignored - it is the dirty little family secret of boaters that they have to be ever vigilant about - you operate to avoid it but you better know how to get back in

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X