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Bit the bullet today...-gctid361250

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    Bit the bullet today...-gctid361250

    I woke the beast today. Took her top off and started cleaning. Started to wet sand the hull this morning (step 1 of 3) with 600 grit wet sand, then going to do 1000 and lastly 2000. After that do some gelcoat repairs, then buff and wax. This should take the better part of 1 month(weekends) to do.

    #2
    k-townguy wrote:
    I woke the beast today. Took her top off and started cleaning. Started to wet sand the hull this morning (step 1 of 3) with 600 grit wet sand, then going to do 1000 and lastly 2000. After that do some gelcoat repairs, then buff and wax. This should take the better part of 1 month(weekends) to do.
    Is wet sanding the way to fix 'rash marks' on the hull?

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      #3
      Wet sanding is a method of removing shallow scratches, but is mainly used for oxidized/chalky hulls. Scratches or dock rash as I call it, need to be filled and faired.

      [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/664237=25426-Photo0130.jpg[/img]

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        #4
        k-townguy wrote:
        Wet sanding is a method of removing shallow scratches, but is mainly used for oxidized/chalky hulls. Scratches or dock rash as I call it, need to be filled and faired.

        http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]
        Well that's a huge difference!I think that I am a candidate for that, my boat could use a lot of work on the outside.Plain as day when you look at it like that.Good luck on yours, I'm sure she'll be a beauty Thanks kindly for the pic & all. Sarah

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          #5
          k-townguy wrote:
          I woke the beast today. Took her top off and started cleaning. Started to wet sand the hull this morning (step 1 of 3) with 600 grit wet sand, then going to do 1000 and lastly 2000. After that do some gelcoat repairs, then buff and wax. This should take the better part of 1 month(weekends) to do.
          Interesting you should mention this. Just got back from the marina, wet sanding my super structure (starboard side only), I'm up to 800 grit from 220 (220, 320, 400, 600, 800). At 800 I decided to do a cut polish with 3M Imperial Rubbing Compound which is supposed to take over from 800 grit. What I got as a very smooth surface but no 'mirror' shine when looking straight on. If you look at it from a very acute angle, you'll see a mirror shine. This isn't satisfactory so I was told to go to 1500 at least! Man, what a job. I'll tackle this on the weekend and cut polish at 1500 to see the results and post back.

          Gary,

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            #6
            That looks great, I bet it looks and feels brand new again to the touch

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              #7
              I've always used 2000 grit to finish the wet sanding step, then some 3M Finesse-It II Glaze on a buffer with foam pad, and then wax. Lots of work but always gives the gel-coat a nice glossy finish.

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