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    Reasonable offers on boats-gctid359240

    What would be considered a reasonable offer on a boat, percentage wise, of the asking price?

    I am not the haggling type, so when I list something for sale on craigslist, I list it for exactly what I want for it, and no less. I don't add a few hundred to the asking price because I want to get buyers and I want to sell quick and I usually do.

    That being said, if someone has a boat listed for a price, but also says or reasonable offer, and it meets my expectations and the description, what would be a reasonable starting point if I would like to offer less than what they are asking?

    #2
    The market is all over the place;people don't understand what the vessel is worth or worse yet try to use the pricing structures and valuation from four and five years ago as a basis for today's values.

    My advice would be for you to do some market research based on sites like yachtworld.com and then make a tender off er subject to survey (condition and valuation). The bottom line is that a sale occurs when a willing seller and a willing buyer agree on price.

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      #3
      I think whats most important is, what is the boat worth to you? if the boat needs some work theyll likely let it go for a lesser value. but if it looks like someone has poured their heart and soul into a boat maintaining it over the years then going in low may just offend them.

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        #4
        You can have 6 boats 6 years old, and each one will be worth a different amount, on Craigslist, you will need to expect to be offered less than the asking, in fact expect to be offered less for any advertised price, that is how it is done; but you do not have to accept any counter offers.
        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
        Twin 350 GM power
        Located in Seward, AK
        Retired marine surveyor

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          #5
          It is amazing how many people will take half of what they are asking if it is politely presented. Don't try it on the first day they list it for sale! If I think something is too high I wait until the add has expired & then call. Just tell them what you think it is worth & ask them to call you if they don't get what they are asking.

          Advertising is cheap. You might find a fool seems to be the logic!
          Ernie
          1986 3270
          Volvo 305s


          MMSI 338130047
          Lake Michigan

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            #6
            I do this on ebay, sometimes it works, but not with retail dealers.
            Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

            Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
            Twin 350 GM power
            Located in Seward, AK
            Retired marine surveyor

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              #7
              A boat is only worth what a buyer will pay for it... and he just has to want it more than me. I won't get too emotionally involved for that last 10% or so.
              Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

              iBoatNW

              1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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                #8
                yup, we just got a brand new 34 and we come pretty close on trade our 2452, wen i got the paper work they put 12500 for the 2452 on the trailer, i walk away went to another dealer got the 34 and keep the 2452, now im selling the 2452 on my own, 12500 yea sure i pay 9k for the genset, 4 for the trailer, 7 on new engine, 600 on propeller, 150 on tv dvd, 1300 on ac/heater, 1200 on enclosure, plus what i pay for the boat. So very much boat is worth what some one would pay for it. My wife is in the hurry to sell mode, i really dont mind keeping the 2452 in the trailer, and using it here in the river, we have te 34 docked 80 milles from home :0)

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                  #9
                  If one can afford it, a second boat for the river sounds like a winner to me.
                  Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                  Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                  Twin 350 GM power
                  Located in Seward, AK
                  Retired marine surveyor

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I think that your question regarding a % of asking price is almost impossible to answer. Too many variables.

                    I do like these suggestions:

                    The bottom line is that a sale occurs when a willing seller and a willing buyer agree on price.
                    I think whats most important is, what is the boat worth to you?................. but if it looks like someone has poured their heart and soul into a boat maintaining it over the years, then going in low may just offend them.
                    Often asking the seller what their bottom line is, works out to the buyer's advantage.

                    You don't risk offending them, and you gain a feel for where they're at. Then you go back to Pete's philosophy above on this.

                    A boat is only worth what a buyer will pay for it.................... I won't get too emotionally involved for that last 10% or so.
                    Yes, don't shoot yourself in the foot if you really like the boat. IOW, don't allow 10% to stand between you and a purchase.

                    .
                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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                      #11
                      Often people let a few thousand dollars stand between selling their boat. If you know the position the seller is in on things like moorage, insurance, payments, maintenance that's due, etc... you can use that to your advantage.

                      For example, on my 2859 I was looking at $200/mo in moorage, insuring two boats ($75 or so a month on the 2859). I wasn't making any payments on either boat, but usually two-boat owners are making two payments. Be willing to look past some small stuff, keep it pleasant and talk cash. Many sellers deal with people who don't have financing aligned before they start looking. Have that checkbook in hand.
                      Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

                      iBoatNW

                      1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Know a guy that made an offer on a boat - knowing that it was going to not be used and owner had payments, moorage, and insurance to pay and things were tight for the seller. Offer was flat refused, he kept shopping but hadn't found the right deal, almost one year later the seller called him and asked if he was still looking. Bought the boat for a bit less than original offer and seller lost the payments, insurance, moorage money for that year.

                        Know another seller that had the boat FSBO - rejected first couple offers, sat on the market for quite a while, finally listed with broker and sold for right at or a bit less than the early offers and had to pay the brokerage fees.

                        If you are going to sell - just sell the damn thing. I know when I have sold both of the ones I had before this one I could have eeked out another 15% or so but in the interest of time and getting the deal done they were gone and I had no risks of ownership of them any longer than I had to. I see so many boats for sale for so long and deteriorating the whole time that if they would just take the first semi-realistic offer that came along they would be way ahead in a few months rather than holding out for that last few bucks.

                        Asking prices are in my book irrelevent to the offer - sometimes they are fair in the ask and there doesn't need to be much back and forth, sometimes they are out of touch (or upsidedown) and the appropriate offer is 50% of what they are asking. If you do a bit of shopping and asking around on what is really selling for what you can get a fairly good read on the market and make an offer that is appropriate for you and the unit you are looking at.
                        1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
                        1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
                        Nobody gets out alive.

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                          #13
                          If the boat is what you're looking for and you like it and the asking price is in the ballpark, offer 80% and take it from there.

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                            #14
                            green650 wrote:
                            What would be considered a reasonable offer on a boat, percentage wise, of the asking price?
                            Half.
                            Mocoondo
                            2002 Bayliner 195 Capri
                            Mercruiser 5.0L V8 / Alpha I Gen II
                            MMSI: 338091755

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                              #15
                              green650 wrote:
                              What would be considered a reasonable offer on a boat, percentage wise, of the asking price?

                              I am not the haggling type, so when I list something for sale on craigslist, I list it for exactly what I want for it, and no less. I don't add a few hundred to the asking price because I want to get buyers and I want to sell quick and I usually do.

                              That being said, if someone has a boat listed for a price, but also says or reasonable offer, and it meets my expectations and the description, what would be a reasonable starting point if I would like to offer less than what they are asking?
                              Others have given you lots of good advice so I'll keep my comments to a minumum. Looking at it as a % discount off asking price doesn't make sense, per se. The asking price could be anything including a ridiculuously high or low amount. And you have to consider that boats, much like houses, are priced based on location. A price in Washington state may seem high (or low) to someone in Florida.

                              Research comparable boats for pricing and then decide what you feel is a reasonable offer.

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