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No limit on atlantic salmon-gctid822022

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    #16
    My step brother got a few from some guys using nets. Seems to me that if you had a good dip net and some sand to throw in the water the fish may come right up thinking it's food.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
    MMSI 367770440
    1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
    Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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      #17
      "Sunnydude" post=822966 wrote:
      Taking my 12 yr old out this week if nothing for the thrill of catching a 10# fish. Most likely will smoke if we catch.
      For most of them, they have such a bad case of yellow mouth, their lower jaw has deformed and they cannot close their mouth around a lure. They can, however, swallow slowly sinking pellets.

      JSYK, the sardines they compress into fish food contain very high levels of PCB's. These fish are dangerous to even feed your dog or cat.
      "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
      MMSI: 367637220
      HAM: KE7TTR
      TDI tech diver
      BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
      Kevin

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        #18
        Yeah, everyone wants to talk about disease, releases etc which are bad enough.

        Even if you had the perfect cage (Land based etc), and were not creating clouds of sea lice, or using 'slice' to prevent it, filtering the water, etc....

        You STILL have to feed the suckers. Where does that food come from...in many cases countries with less stringent environmental laws allowing massive overfishing to provide fish farms with food.

        There is just no way to do fish farming without impact on the existing fragile environment.

        Chay

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          #19
          "CptCrunchie" post=822081 wrote:
          I don't eat farmed salmon, though lots of articles have been written about the sustainability, health and what would happen if they got loose on the west coast.
          Farmed salmon prices are way up this year due to problems the farms are having with disease. At my local supermarket, farmed salmon has gone from $5.99/lb to $9.99/lb. Some types of wild salmon are now actually cheaper than farmed.

          "CptCrunchie" post=822082 wrote:
          However, they believe that Atlantic salmon won't cross-breed
          Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) aren't actually a salmon. They're more closely related to trout - they're the only fish called a salmon in the gneus Salmo. The names for these fish were given to them a century or more ago based on their appearance. DNA testing in the 1980s and 1990s clarified the taxonomy.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmo

          One of the more surprising results of the DNA analysis was that the rainbow trout (originally Salmo gairdneri), long used as an example of the archetypical trout, is actually more closely related to salmon (steelhead when ocean-going) and was renamed Oncorhynchus mykiss. Oncorhynchus being the genus of the Pacific salmons and trout.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oncorhynchus

          I don't know if Atlantic salmon can interbreed with Pacific salmon, but the chances are probably lower than silver (Coho) salmon interbreeding with king (Chinook) salmon. And AFAIK that doesn't happen either.

          "cfoss1" post=823053 wrote:
          You STILL have to feed the suckers. Where does that food come from...in many cases countries with less stringent environmental laws allowing massive overfishing to provide fish farms with food.
          The energy savings from fish farming comes from the fish not having to expend energy to find food and escape predation, and people not having to expend energy to capture the fish for harvest.

          The drawback comes from the highly localized concentration of fish. It's less of a concern for farmed trout, catfish, and tilapia, which are usually raised in ponds so their waste products and any diseases or parasitic infestations are restricted to the single pond. But farmed salmon are raised in pens open to the ocean. Their waste can upset the local ecosystem, and any diseases or parasites they carry can jump over to wild fish.

          There is just no way to do fish farming without impact on the existing fragile environment.
          Despite what environmentalists like people to think, ecosystems are rarely fragile. Just about every fragile ecosystem which ever existed self-destructed by itself millions of years ago - because they were fragile. The overwhelming majority of existing ecosystems are still around precisely because they are robust and able to survive large deviations from "normal" conditions.

          The problem is actually the opposite of the ecosystem being fragile. The ecosystem is extremely robust, so people abuse it (e.g. overharvest fish) with little noticeable impact because the ecosystem can compensate for it. And so it continues for decades with people not caring about the abuse. Until finally we reach the limits of the ecosystem's ability to recover, the point where the straw breaks the camel's back, and suddenly the fish population crashes (e.g. Atlantic cod) when for decades it seemed just fine under slightly less pressure.
          1994 2556, 350 MAG MPI Horizon, Bravo 2

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