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    Halibut in WA-gctid793291

    Not sure if you are aware, but there is a movement afoot supported by the North Olympic Peninsula chapter of the Puget Sound Anglers, and it is to change the entire halibut season here in WA. One of our members, Dave Croonquist is very active with everything going on in our area, and has an understanding of the regulations, people involved and proposals that has me astounded and humbled.

    A participating member of North or Falcon, he recently traveled to Victoria, BC for the IPHC (International Pacific Halibut Commission) meeting. Formed in 1923, this group sets the halibut quotas for AK, BC, WA, OR and CA. I have attached the IPHC quotas for 2017. (The red highlighted numbers are from us getting back the sablefish bi-catch quota given to the commercial fleet.)

    Quoting Dave's letter to the various 'powers that be' regarding the sablefish bi-catch:

    We have been working with WDFW staff for a number of years trying to get the WA sport allocation, that was given to the sablefish fleet in 2002, back for our use. Nothing has come out of our discussions except that it could be looked at and then another year goes by without any action. This year, we're giving up 70,000 lbs for an incidental take of halibut during the sablefish fishery, about 30% of our base fishery. Those pounds are adding over 20% to the commercial harvest share. The sport fishing fleet and the coastal communities would greatly benefit from any additional quota made available to us.

    Here are our three objectives as outlined by Dave in a letter to our membership:

    1. Get the full sport fishery share (93,652 lbs. for 2017) that is currently going to the sablefish fleet back into the sport harvest quota, which could lead to an increase in the number of days on the water for 2017.

    2. Work with the IPHC and PFMC to recognize the economic importance of the sport fishing fleet to the coastal economies by providing a longer season structure similar to what Alaska and British Columbia have with a daily bag limit of one fish, a field possession limit of two fish, and an annual possession limit of six fish. Our proposal could/should also be applied to Oregon and California in some manner. Six fish may be too many and the proposed season dates probably need to be cut back some ÔÇô maybe a little later opening and closing in September. There are a number of options to explore.

    3. Getting a separate halibut catch record card for Washington so we can find out how many people are actually fishing for halibut or, as an alternative, dropping the number of boxes on the current CRC from ten spaces to six or fewer spaces and having WDFW set up a regulation requiring the reporting of all halibut taken within 30 days of the close of the season either electronically or by mail as is done with the Puget Sound crab CRC reporting process.

    Bottom line: We want WA go to a system similar to what Canada uses. So far, the topic has been broached and a very large seed has been planted. Now we need to germinate it. However, our best chance for a change won't happen until next year.

    IMO, this is by far the best proposal for everyone BUT the tribes; now they can't go out a week before our opener like they did on 2015 and bomb the entire area. It also allows us to have the ability to pick the times when the weather is safe for us, our family and friends, and the tides are favorable. I would also be happy with a 2 halibut per year maximum quota.

    As to instituting the maximum size limits that Canada uses, there is no restriction within the proposal. There is, however, varying opinions from both sides of the size issue.

    In other news, if you haven't heard, North of Falcon tribes have refused to open the doors for public viewing of the salmon quota setting procedure. No surprise really. Being sovereign, they don't have to follow any guidelines, and the feds seem okay with that. Therefore, the tribes have increased their resistance to transparency. More to come.


    Attached files

    "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
    MMSI: 367637220
    HAM: KE7TTR
    TDI tech diver
    BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
    Kevin

    #2
    Up here a big one is the charter guys. Don't get me wrong, we need the tourism, and everyone deserves to catch fish.Many of the charter guys don't seem to think they have to follow the rules. It used to be they would target the large females. This in part has led to the declining halibut stocks, in our area at least. They also will go to a good rockfish are, and all six guests will fill their quota in one spot.

    There are of course many of the charter captains that are good, and know how to not over fish certain areas.

    I have always wondered why Washington has a such a short season, and BC is almost wide open.
    Joel
    1987 3818 Hino 175
    "Knotty Girl"
    Prince Rupert B.C.

    Comment


      #3
      "canoel" post=793292 wrote:
      I have always wondered why Washington has a such a short season, and BC is almost wide open.
      WDFW claims we met our quota last year on the third day of fishing.

      [attachment]33585 wrote:
      WDFW2016Halibut.jpg[/attachment]

      I have no clue who got the fish, but I know of only two boats who landed one each in Area 6. The rest of us got skunked. And this year we have 3 - one day openers. Since witnessing all the chaos and raging angry people, those who dropped in Sequim and Port Angeles rather than travel west like they usually do because of a one day opener, I'm not even going out.
      "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
      MMSI: 367637220
      HAM: KE7TTR
      TDI tech diver
      BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
      Kevin

      Comment


        #4
        Let's hope that some common sense regulations are adopted. The options explained above by CptCrunchie would be a great improvement over the current version. Here's hoping, fingers crossed. K
        Kevin & Robyn
        Koppers Kove
        MMSI 338206107
        2001 Bayliner 2452
        5.7 B2 PT BRA3 17p

        Comment


          #5
          It's my fault. The year after I bought some halibut gear, the one day opener/two or three day season started. My boat isn't trailerable, so if I use my soon to be sold boat, it's about $500 in gas, or if I take the 3818 and run slow, about $375 in diesel. I enjoy fishing, and a fresh fish dinner is always a high point, but there is a limit to how much I'm going to spend.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
          MMSI 367770440
          1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
          Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

          Comment


            #6
            I wish they would go to some sort of tag system. Allow each person one maybe two per year?

            Heck, even if it's a lottery system where only half of us get a tag each year, and then you can go out whenever you want to catch that one would be better than what we havevnow.

            How many of you here actually think that system where they have someone at the dock counting peopke with fish coming in the launch ramp actually works? To me it seems like that's only a dog and pony show to make it look like they know what they're doing. The ones that are actually doing the catching are going at night, going to their slips, boat houses, etc.

            When hunting season is going on do they have people stationed at all the parking lots counting deer?
            Esteban
            B-ham!
            Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

            Comment


              #7
              Here is a letter just issued from the WA State 24th District representatives. The good news is we are getting more halibut days. The bad news is they will all still be one day openers, better known as Derby Style fishing. Special thanks also go to Dave Croonquist of Puget Sound Anglers, North Olympic Peninsula.



              Dear friends and neighbors,

              Two years ago, our regional halibut fishing season was reduced to just three days, with brutal consequences. The competition to harvest halibut in such a short window pushed businesses and employees to their limits and raised serious safety concerns. It was the kind of "accident waiting to happen" that we can't afford to repeat, and we know folks out there remain wary.

              In that light, we'd like to share what we know from a meeting Thursday with legislative staff and staff from the state Dept. of Fish & Wildlife. Though our halibut fishing season is determined by the International Pacific Halibut Commission and implemented by the National Marine Fisheries, our state officials have significant input and have requested a seven-day season for this year.



              Fish & Wildlife staff say approval of their request is likely and that the final determination will be announced later this month. So we think prospects for this season look good. If the commission approves Fish & Wildlife's request, this year's halibut fishing season will take place on May 4, 6, 11, 21 and 25 and on June 1 and 4. In addition, if the halibut quota has not been exhausted on those dates, the season could be extended; if so, the additional dates would be posted on the Fish & Wildlife website at dfw.wa.gov.

              If you would like to voice your priorities for future halibut seasons, including even specific dates you believe might be best, Fish & Wildlife holds a public comment period every November. To receive notification of when that comment period will take place, you can sign up for Fish & Wildlife's email listserv by emailing a request to Michele Culver at michele.culver@dfw.wa.gov.

              Signed

              Senator Kevin Van De Wege

              State Representative Steve Tharinger

              State Representative Mike Chapman
              "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
              MMSI: 367637220
              HAM: KE7TTR
              TDI tech diver
              BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
              Kevin

              Comment


                #8
                Good news if they go with the seven day opening. Now if they would just open before the fish migrate instead of after.....
                P/C Pete
                Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
                MMSI 367770440
                1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
                Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

                Comment


                  #9
                  "green650" post=793955 wrote:
                  I wish they would go to some sort of tag system. Allow each person one maybe two per year?

                  Heck, even if it's a lottery system where only half of us get a tag each year, and then you can go out whenever you want to catch that one would be better than what we havevnow.

                  How many of you here actually think that system where they have someone at the dock counting peopke with fish coming in the launch ramp actually works? To me it seems like that's only a dog and pony show to make it look like they know what they're doing. The ones that are actually doing the catching are going at night, going to their slips, boat houses, etc.

                  When hunting season is going on do they have people stationed at all the parking lots counting deer?
                  Steve, in the Cliffe Note version, this is what we have proposed:

                  1. A 6 halibut per year per license.

                  2. A season from the 2nd Saturday in March to the 3rd Saturday in October.

                  3. A one per day catch, with a possession limit of 2. That means, if you catch one on Saturday and one on Sunday, you must return home with them.

                  4. A catch card similar to what we have for crab. It will have to be turned in within a month of the closing.

                  5. A paid $10 stamp - similar to what Canada has for salmon - where you must have one to harvest halibut.

                  6. The WA Sport Fleet - we - want the 70,000 lbs back that was given to the sablefish fleet for bi-catch halibut. (Explained better below.)

                  Other than the obvious concerns, like one day openers, bad tides and the mandates of fishing when the weather and seas are dangerous, the current bones of contention are:

                  1. WDFW, and in particular, Ms Culver cited that if everyone caught their 6 halibut limit, that would equate to 30,000,000 lbs of halibut. The only way she could have come up with that number, is if she is counting all WA fishing licenses. So even if you only fish for trout in Spokane, she is counting your share of halibut too. A stamp would show exactly how many people are going out for halibut.

                  2. A catch card is the only way to show actual harvest numbers. As much as WDFW thinks they are doing a great job, I have personally seen one fish counter actually log a sole as a halibut.

                  3. Most of us would be happy with 2 per year, just let us go get them when we want, when the tides are optimum and it is safe for us, our families and guests.

                  4. Fishing is big business here on the Peninsula, and many businesses are near collapse if something isn't done soon.

                  5. The last piece is ugly, no matter how I try to explain it. Last year, the tribes were allowed to longline the entire bottom in areas 4, 5 and 6 a week before our opener. A season would take the pressure off this entitlement mindset and we will have a better chance of landing one. They will still be able to do as they like, they just won't be able to stomp on our chances a week prior to when we have to fish.

                  Here is an excerpt from Dave Croonquist's report from the IPHC (International Pacific Halibut Commission) meeting in Victoria, BC, January 23-27, 2017.

                  The halibut fishery has been managed through the IPHC based on a convention (treaty) signed between the US and Canada in 1923. The Convention has been updated periodically over the years. The primary focus of the IPHC on halibut management has been for the commercial long-line fishery. While there was always some take of halibut by sport fishers, the interest in the fishery has grown over the past 20+ years. The IPHC sets the sideboards (landing quotas) that are then applied by apportionment between US waters and Canadian waters.

                  [li]Alaska (Areas 2C through 4E) is managed under the umbrella of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council and gets the lion's share of the total allowed halibut harvest. Alaska will have 22,620,000 lbs. with 2,815,000 lbs. for the recreational charter fleet and the private, unguided sport fleet which will take an estimated 3+ million lbs. of harvest.[/li]

                  [li]Canada (Area 2B) will have 7.45 million lbs. with 15% (1,117,500 lbs.) going to the sport fleet. WA, OR, and CA (Area 2A) are managed through the Pacific Fisheries Management Council.[/li]

                  [li]The 2A Catch Share is 1.33 million lbs. for 2017, an increase of 190,000 lbs. over 2016. The 2A quota is divided up by tribal quota of 465,500 lbs. (35% of the 2A quota), non-tribal commercial quota of 265,402 lbs. (30.4% which includes the salmon troll incidental take), and the WA sport fleet share 307,702 lbs. (35.6% of 2A total) which is then divided into the 4 halibut areas (Columbia River, South Coast (Westport), North Coast (La Push and Neah Bay) and Puget Sound. The WA sport fleet share is reduced by 70,000 lbs. which is given in the 2A Catch Share Plan to the sablefish fleet for incidental take of halibut during their fishery N. of Pt. Chehalis (Westport). That leaves the sport fleet with 237,762 lbs., an increase of 23,652 lbs. over last year.[/li]

                  [li]The OR sport fleet will get 29.7% (256,756 lbs.)[/li]

                  [li]The CA sport fleet will get 4% (34,580 lbs.).[/li]

                  "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
                  MMSI: 367637220
                  HAM: KE7TTR
                  TDI tech diver
                  BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
                  Kevin

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The biggest problem with by-catch is: They target their by-catch.
                    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                    Twin 350 GM power
                    Located in Seward, AK
                    Retired marine surveyor

                    Comment


                      #11
                      The latest letter from MS. Culver, Intergovernmental Ocean Policy Manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). a letter to the Port Angeles City Council upon a resolution on behalf of the struggling fish-reliant businesses to encourage WDFW to increase the allowable dates for landing halibut. As far as I recall, Ms. Culver is incorrect in a number of her points, but she has yet to even recognize the directions we want to take. I've included my comments in a different color throughout the letter.



                      March 4, 2017

                      RE: City of Port Angeles Resolution No. 05-17, Regarding Recreational Halibut Seasons

                      Dear City of Port Angeles Council Members:

                      I am writing in response to the resolution passed by the City Council regarding halibut fishing seasons. I am the Intergovernmental Ocean Policy Manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and oversee the management of our state's halibut fisheries.

                      First of all, we sincerely appreciate the intent of the City's resolution on this matter. The safety of our angling public and the promotion of economic benefits to local communities resulting from fisheries are important to our agency. I am offering these comments in an effort to provide you with some additional information that I hope you will find helpful in your future discussions about halibut seasons.

                      I would like to provide some background information regarding halibut management as context for my comments on items 1 and 4, relative to a six halibut annual bag limit for anglers, and a season that extends from mid-March through mid-October, which represent a change from current regulations. Items 2 and 3ÔÇöno limit on the poundage of an individual fish, and a daily limit of one fish and a possession limit of two fishÔÇöare already in federal and state regulations.

                      Management Background

                      As you may know, the halibut stock is managed by the International Pacific Halibut Commission

                      (IPHC), formed by a convention between the U.S. and Canada, throughout its range from the Bering Sea to northern California. The IPHC has an annual meeting in January to set the quotas for its management areas, which are displayed in Figure 1.



                      Because these quotas are adopted by an international body, they are implemented in federal regulations by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). As such, the states are required to adhere to these federal quotas and, if the state did not take action to close its fisheries when the quota was attained, NMFS could preempt the state with federal action.

                      The West Coast is managed as "Area 2A" and is comprised of the waters off Washington, Oregon, and California, and includes state waters, such as Puget Sound. The quotas that IPHC adopted for the last six years for each of its management areas are described in Table 1.

                      Table 1. International Pacific Halibut Commission quotas (in millions of pounds, net weight) by management area, 2012-2017.



                      As you can see, the Area 2A quota has been relatively stable at approximately 1 million pounds over this period. Area 2B is Canada. It is my understanding that the proposal in the resolution was patterned after the Canadian recreational halibut regulations, which includes a six fish annual bag limit and a similar season that opens in February. However, as you can see in Table 1, Area 2B consistently has a quota that is six or seven times that of Area 2A.

                      The reason for this is that halibut are "apportioned" by IPHC among these management areas relative to the distribution of the stock with the primary nursery grounds occurring in the Bering Sea and the center of the population being off Alaska. Area 2A is considered to be at the far end of the stock's range. The distribution of halibut is determined through an annual survey conducted by IPHC in all of these management areas, and some tagging research to help inform the level of migration that occurs among areas.

                      Within 2A, the quota is shared among all user groupsÔÇötribal, commercial, and recreational

                      (Figure 2). The allocation of the 2A quota among those groups is defined by the Pacific Fishery



                      As reflected in Figure 2, Washington receives the largest allocation of recreational quota. The commercial fishery is also restricted to the area south of Point Chehalis, Washington, and primarily occurs off of Oregon. WDFW closed the commercial fishery inside state waters in 1996, and then followed up with actions through PFMC to prioritize the allocation of halibut for state recreational fisheries north of Point Chehalis through the Catch Sharing Plan in 2000. Additionally, since 2003, the commercial halibut fishery has been closed through federal regulations from the shore seaward to the 100-fathom depth contour to protect yelloweye rockfish, which are managed under a rebuilding plan.

                      Annual Process to Consider Regulation Changes and Set Seasons

                      WDFW has a minimum of two public meetings each year to consider changes to recreational halibut fishing regulations and identify and discuss the season dates that we would recommend to NMFS through PFMC, for the following season. During these meetings, we review a tide calendar to help select dates that have the most favorable tides to help address safety concerns (i.e., days with large tidal exchanges tend to be more difficult to fish, particularly by anglers with smaller boats), and WDFW's role is typically one of facilitation.

                      For the most part, we do not have a stake in the outcome relative to the specific dates that are selected, but try our best to achieve a consensus view that meets the overall objective of maximizing season length and the comments we hear to ensure that the process is as "fair" as possible to all of the participants. For example, there are anglers who favor fishing on weekends and others who prefer weekdays; some want to ensure that scheduled halibut derby days are included. Additionally, some would prefer consecutive days, othersÔÇöparticularly local businessesÔÇöfavor having at least one closed day in between open days so visitors stay overnight.

                      Needless to say, these meetings usually last a few hours as there is considerable "give and take" amongst the stakeholders and, in the end, we usually do reach consensus on the dates selected. However, because these are fisheries managed under federal quotas, we try to select as many dates up front that we believe are likely with the understanding that the quota may not be sufficient to accommodate all of the days.

                      For 2017, the stakeholders recommended seven specific datesÔÇöMay 4, 6, 11, 21, and 25, and June 1 and 4ÔÇöwhich were posted on our website a few months ago. (Note: I am not sure where the notion that WDFW was limiting the fishery to three days came from.) The season is structured such that, if there is quota remaining after June 4th, then the fishery would continue on a similar Thursday/Sunday schedule, until the quota was reached.

                      From there, WDFW recommends those dates to PFMC. The dates approved by PFMC are transmitted in the form of recommendations to NMFS. Once the IPHC annual meeting concludes, NMFS begins its rulemaking process to adopt these dates into federal regulations. Once the dates have been finalized in federal regulations, WDFW takes conforming action to adopt the season dates in state regulations.

                      For the 2017 season, the federal proposed rule has been published and is out for public comment until March 15. Once that rule is finalized, WDFW will issue a news release to announce the final season dates.

                      Six Halibut Annual Bag Limit

                      Our understanding of the objective of the six fish annual bag limit is to reduce the number of halibut that are retained by anglers. This, in turn, would reduce the overall catch that counts against the quota, thereby allowing for a longer season.
                      (If this makes any sense, please help me understand. The biggest reason for a 6 annual bag limit works only with the 1/day, 2 in the field limit. How would this reduce the quota?)

                      WDFW has considered this proposal as it was proposed to us by representatives of Puget Sound Anglers a few years ago. WDFW has a Catch Record Card system and anglers are required to record the number of halibut caught and submit their Catch Record Card each year to the Department. Based on our analysis of the returned Catch Record Cards from 2010-2014, 84% of Washington's halibut anglers report catching two or fewer fish per year and 63% report catching only one fish. Therefore, having a six fish annual bag limit would have little effect.

                      An annual bag limit of two fish would affect roughly 16% of the anglers (i.e., those who report harvesting more than two fish per year); and an annual bag limit of one fish would affect 37% of the anglers. However, in taking the analysis a step furtherÔÇöbecause the majority of the anglers only catch one halibut per year now, we determined that reducing the annual bag limit to one halibut may not provide sufficient fish for an additional fishing day.


                      This is such a misguided statement. In 2015, it was open for 8 days, to which I went out on 4 of them. Not only were the tides against us, the wind was too. The last day, we started at Freshwater Bay, but the current was just too strong. We motored east to Green Point,but again, the winds and seas were whipping. In fact, on our way back to Port Angeles Haven Boat Ramp, I hurried the bow twice, with green water coming right over the wheelhouse, swamping the aft deck. Thankfully, she shook it off and kept going. So, for her numbers to be accurate, she needs to take into consideration far more than the yearly catch counts.



                      Season Length

                      With regard to the season length, as described above, the halibut fisheries are managed under federal quotas, and the states are required to monitor their respective fisheries, project when the quota is anticipated to be attained, and close the fishery accordingly. Failure to do so could result in preemptive federal action and, over time, continued overages could erode the state's credibility relative to our ability to manage fisheries to stay within their quotas.

                      The Washington recreational halibut fishery has gained popularity over the last ten years as more anglers are participating and halibut has perhaps helped fill the gap between bottomfish and salmon seasons for local communities. Unfortunately, over this same period, the 2A quota has remained relatively static, and the Puget Sound recreational halibut fishery has consistently exceeded its quota. So, an increase in angler effort, coupled with higher catch rates, and fishing against a relatively flat quota, has resulted in continually shortened seasons.

                      Figure 3. Comparison of Puget Sound recreational halibut quota, WDFW catch estimates, and corresponding season lengths, 2000-2015.



                      In 2016, the season was the same length as in 2015ÔÇöeight daysÔÇöand the quota was exceeded by 79%. Both IPHC and PFMC have expressed concern about the Puget Sound halibut fishery continually exceeding its quota, and this practice has also raised management challenges for WDFW as other areas along the coast (Neah Bay, La Push, and Westport) have even shorter seasons (typically lasting three to four days in recent years), but are managed in a manner that keeps their fisheries within their respective quotas, creating the perception of a double-standard.

                      WDFW manages the coastal halibut fisheries by monitoring the quota attainment and taking action inseason to close the fishery. This is consistent with how the recreational halibut fisheries are managed in Oregon and California and how the tribal and commercial fisheries are managed. Puget Sound had been managed by selecting season dates preseason then estimating catch after the season had concluded. As mentioned above, this method has resulted in catches that exceed the quota. Beginning in 2015, WDFW received a grant from NMFS to explore alternative methods that would allow us to monitor the Puget Sound quota attainment and take inseason action, similar to how other halibut fisheries are managed. We were able to develop and use a system in 2016 that produced comparable catch estimate results as our previous method, and we will be managing the Puget Sound halibut fishery in 2017 under this new system to help ensure the fishery stays within its quota.

                      Additionally, until 2017, WDFW has had staggered halibut seasons across its management areas

                      (i.e., Puget Sound, Neah Bay and La Push, Westport, and Ilwaco). In talking with our stakeholders, we learned that many of our anglers fish multiple areas during the year catching fish that counted against the quota for the port being fished on a given day. In an effort to


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                      Port Angeles City Council

                      March 4, 2017

                      Page 7

                      address the shortened halibut seasons that every area is experiencing, we received a proposal to have a uniform statewide halibut season (i.e., all areas open concurrently). We agreed to implement that proposal beginning this year and are hopeful that it will help extend the season for all areas.

                      Again, we sincerely appreciate the intent of the City's resolution regarding the structure of our recreational halibut seasons, and hope that you find this information helpful. We do share your concerns with regard to public safety and the importance of fisheries to local economies, and hope that we can work together to find feasible solutions.

                      If you have any questions, or if you would like to be added to our e-mail list to be notified of our annual recreational halibut meetings in advance, please feel free to contact me at (360) 902-2182 or Michele.Culver@dfw.wa.gov.

                      Sincerely,

                      Michele K. Culver

                      Intergovernmental Ocean Policy Manager


                      cc: Senator Van de Wege Representative Chapman

                      Clallam County Commissioners

                      Jefferson County Commissioners

                      Port of Port Angeles

                      City of Forks

                      City of Port Townsend

                      City of Sequim

                      Jim Unsworth, WDFW

                      Ron Warren, WDFW


                      Attached files

                      "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
                      MMSI: 367637220
                      HAM: KE7TTR
                      TDI tech diver
                      BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
                      Kevin

                      Comment

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