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Resealing your drain plug flange-gctid392968

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    Resealing your drain plug flange-gctid392968

    The first thing that tipped me off that my drain plug flange was leaking was when I was pulling the boat out of the water a few trips ago, I noticed the entire flange turned 1/8" or so when I cracked the drain plug loose. The leaking flange was confirmed when a few cups of water spilled out of the bilge (not a drop of water entered the boat during the trip). So thanks to a little help from Senior member Rocky_Road, the following project began....Things you will need for the project: 3m 5200 Marine Sealant (i used the 24 hr dry time), Philips head screwdriver, flat head screwdriver, wire brush, couple clean rags

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696581=28952-1.jpg[/img]First thing I did was put a philips head screwdriver on the screws and made sure the holes were not stripped out. I simply made sure I could tighten all the screws. If yours will not tighten because they are stripped, you will need to drill new holes. Mine were good to go, so I will continue with the project.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696581=28953-2.jpg[/img]After removing the flange, I found large amounts of silicone from some cheapy fix someone else had tried at some point in time. I used a flat blade screwdriver (not the best tool for the job, but if you are careful you can use it without scratching the gel coat) to removed the old silicone and get things cleaned up and ready to go.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696581=28954-3.jpg[/img]I cleaned up the rest of the surface with a clean wet rag followed by a dry rag. This is the result. At this point you will need to let the transom drain. Water works it way up into the screw holes and back behind the fiberglass. I allowed mine to drain for 5 hours, mixed with a heat gun periodically I got as much drained out as I could. If planned ahead, I would allow a good couple dry days to allow the transom to drain completely. I will probably end up redoing this job at the end of the boating season before winter. But for now, it is much better than it was.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696581=28955-4.jpg[/img]This is the back side of the drain plug flange. As you can see it is oily and dirty. I used a wire brush and a wet rag to clean the drain plug flange.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696581=28956-5.jpg[/img]Here is the flange all cleaned up. Be careful what you use to clean the flange, the directions on the 3m 5200 sealant are very specific on what you cannot use.

    #2
    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696582=28957-6.jpg[/img]I then applied a massive amount of 3m 5200 sealant to the back side of the flange.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696582=28958-7.jpg[/img]Did the same to the transom surface. I also filled the screw holes with as much sealant as possible.

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696582=28959-8.jpg[/img]I applied the flange, careful to not allow the inside of the flange to fill with sealant. I tightened each screw a little at a time, to make sure the flange tightened down evenly

    [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/696582=28960-9.jpg[/img]Using a clean dry rag, I removed all the excess sealant from around the flange and from the little bit that leaks into the center of the drain. Also be careful to get all the sealant off the screw heads, in the event you ever need to remove the screws again, being able to put the driver on them makes life a lot easier. Let set for 24 hours and you have a wonderfully sealed drain plug flange. Took the boat out that weekend, sealed tight.

    Comment


      #3
      Good write up!:coo-

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks this is something I want to do too. Good write up.

        Comment


          #5
          whitey382 wrote:


          http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]I then applied a massive amount of 3m 5200 sealant to the back side of the flange.

          http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]Did the same to the transom surface. I also filled the screw holes with as much sealant as possible.

          http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]I applied the flange, careful to not allow the inside of the flange to fill with sealant. I tightened each screw a little at a time, to make sure the flange tightened down evenly

          http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]Using a clean dry rag, I removed all the excess sealant from around the flange and from the little bit that leaks into the center of the drain. Also be careful to get all the sealant off the screw heads, in the event you ever need to remove the screws again, being able to put the driver on them makes life a lot easier. Let set for 24 hours and you have a wonderfully sealed drain plug flange. Took the boat out that weekend, sealed tight.
          Looks good but too bad you used 5200, it's for permanent installations. You wrote you plan on re-doing it at end of season. 3M 4200 was the product to use. Just an FYI.Gary.

          Comment


            #6
            garball wrote:
            Looks good but too bad you used 5200, it's for permanent installations. You wrote you plan on re-doing it at end of season. 3M 4200 was the product to use. Just an FYI.

            Gary.
            Oh well, guess its staying then

            Comment


              #7
              It looks like you've protected the transom very well against any further water ingress. Good job and a good write-up.

              Here's a tip that can save you some clean up effort on the next similar sealing project:


              1. Once you have the fitting removed and the area fully cleaned up, cover the entire work area in blue or green painter's masking tape.
              2. Put the fitting back in place, and with a sharp exacto knife, cut around the outside edge of the fitting, scoring through the tape.
              3. Lift the fitting back off, and peel away the tape that was under it, leaving a masked area around the outside edges.
              4. Finish the installation, just like you did above, and wipe off the excess sealant.
              5. Then peel off the masking tape. It leaves a perfect edge with almost no effort and fewer rags.



              Comment


                #8
                whitey382 wrote:
                If planned ahead, I would allow a good couple dry days to allow the transom to drain completely. I will probably end up redoing this job at the end of the boating season before winter. But for now, it is much better than it was.
                I wouldn't worry about this. The first step you took was a smart one. You know the core isn't rotten, by checking right at the point where leakage was the worst. You caught it in time, and it's sufficiently dry to leave it now. The 5200 will not fail on you.

                Comment


                  #9
                  JWebber wrote:
                  Good write up!:coo-
                  Good call

                  Comment

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