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Bayliner 1700 Capri Floor Repair-gctid569664

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    Bayliner 1700 Capri Floor Repair-gctid569664

    Hi guys! I know this section says "completed projects" but there is no section for "in progress" projects. Also, according to a couple posts I found in this forum, it was deemed ok to post "in progress" projects in this section. That said, this thread is where I plan to try and document the progress I make as I repair the floor on my 1988 Capri.

    I am a first time boat owner and completely new to the sport/hobby. I have no experience with it, nor family or friends who have boats. Kind of crazy, I know. I was always into go-karts, dirt bikes, quads, etc growing up and never really into the water stuff. Probably because I live in the Seattle area where the summers never got hot enough to make me want to jump on the water. Over the past few years however, I have been doing more and more lakeside camping, and each time I have been out there, I have seen a lot of boats, jet skis, you name it out running around looking like they were having a ton of fun. I never really put any serious thought into it, although, I looked around at used stuff on Craigslist every now and again as a time killer.

    Recently however, an opportunity presented itself which allowed me to make a trade for my boat, which I got from the original owner. It seems to be in good shape overall, but it had one "soft spot" on the floor in the rear of the boat - basically right where everyone steps down off the seat from the swim ladder area. The boat also didn't run and none of the electrical worked, and the starter wouldn't turn the engine over. I spent some time rebuilding the starter and doing a compression test (125 PSI on all cylinders), then eventually got it to start and run. I also spent a little time getting the electrical working to include the stereo, lights, bilge pump, and horn. I wanted to make sure it was all semi operational before I put any real effort or money into the floor.

    So, that brings us up to speed. Aside from thinking I need a water pump impeller, the floor is the last thing I need to take care of before I can water test it. Let's start with some pictures...

    Here was the boat when I brought it home:







    And here is what I started with the rear floor. If you look at the large section lying to the left in the photo, you can see the top (facing the camera) is wet from the rain it sat in the night before, however, if you look closely at the broken edges, you can see where the wood is a lighter color where it's dry on the bottom side:



    Basically, what I think happened is between getting slightly wet, the fact there is a 24" span between stringers, and no support between the top of the fuel tank and the bottom of the deck, the 1/2" deck simply cracked under the stress of people stepping on it over and over again. I was honestly expecting a lot more rot than what I have found. The boat spent it's first night at my house without a cover on, and of course it poured down rain after being in the 70s all week, so that's what a lot of the wet wood is from. The areas I have taken apart are actually dry about half way through the wood and on the bottom side, and none of the foam is wet, nor is there water down around the fuel tank (which drains to the bilge). The stringers are good and solid and seem to be ok as well.

    So, following the initial "rip and tear" to get the floor out, I decided to pull the carpet all the way out of the boat, as well as the rest of the seats:



    As you can see, there is some weakness/rot around the ski locker area, but it isn't too bad, and the rest of the floor looks pretty good considering. I plan to repair the ski locker area when I put in the new rear section that I have torn apart.

    ~T.J.

    #2
    good luck with your project! You could have started somewhere else and we could have moved it to completed once you are done but it's fine as it is....

    The sad news is that boats always start to rot from the keel up and from the stern forward. If the floor is bad the stringers usually were bad long before. Don't be shocked if you have to dig deeper and deeper.......

    Comment


      #3
      Once I had created enough destruction inside to satisfy myself as to what I was up against, I decided to turn to the hull while waiting for the rain to dry up inside. I removed all the extra pin striping that was either too "busy" looking, or missing sections.

      As seen above, this was before:



      This is after:





      I think it looks MUCH more clean without all the unnecessary stripes. I took off a total of 4 individual stripes, plus the giant white graphics on the sides. I want to clean it up some more, but I haven't decided which direction I want to go with it it. I am thinking I will remove the multicolor stripes below the blue on the side and re-stripe it with a single wide stripe, then simply redo the "BAYLINER" text on the sides and be done with it.

      As for the floor, I don't have any pictures right now, but I managed to get some more of it cut out from the rear. My plan is to cut out the rear sections right up along the jump seat bases and across the rear section between them. The original plywood goes UNDER these areas, but I don't want to pull all that out since it looks pretty good as-is. I will lay a new sheet down cut to fit that section (as well as the areas of the ski locker), then I plan to simply sand off all the old fiberglass resin from the rest of the deck. This should give me all "new" dry wood to work with. I am thinking I will then coat everything in epoxy resin, use fiberglass cloth to tie into the hull sides, jump seat frames, rear of boat, and to tie the deck pieces together, then go over it all with more resin and some CSM to finish it off.

      Originally I wanted to gel coat it all and do snap in carpet, but at this point, I am thinking once I get the epoxy resin and CSM down, I will simply put carpet back in like factory and enjoy it so I can get it out on the water and save some cost. No sense in dumping a ton of money into a boat that I may outgrow by the next season. Besides, the work I do and the products I use will probably still be far superior to the work that was done originally, and that lasted nearly 30 years.

      ~T.J.

      Comment


        #4
        "kjs" post=569670 wrote:
        good luck with your project! You could have started somewhere else and we could have moved it to completed once you are done but it's fine as it is....

        The sad news is that boats always start to rot from the keel up and from the stern forward. If the floor is bad the stringers usually were bad long before. Don't be shocked if you have to dig deeper and deeper.......
        Yeah, this was my thought as well. I don't know if I'm being overly optimistic or simply in denial, but it genuinely looks to me like it's only the main top deck that was damaged. The stringers seem solid and all the foam is dry. I would imagine I would have obvious damage to the stringers and wet foam if there was rot down there? I have looked and poked around under the seats, around the fuel tank, and in the bilge area (which are all gel coated) and don't see any signs of rot.

        It really seems it was only the one area on the surface, and more so that it "broke" than it rotted out which made the floor "soft". I especially believe this to be true because if the wood was rotted where it was soft, I would think it would not be dry on the bottom side, correct?

        ~T.J.

        Comment


          #5
          correct! You should play in the lottery asap..... That's more than luck. Usually you start to dig in and find wet foam and brown and mushy wood.

          If you want to avoid carpet and have a good and waterproof floor have a look at Durabak 18. It's a PU material with pieces of rubber (shredded tires) in it. Get a free color sample first to see whether you like it! Some don't like that you can see the black rubber coming through the surface a bit. If you don't like that you will have to paint with the pure material over it again. Good thing is that you can roll or brush it on.

          Comment


            #6
            I did some more cutting and exploring tonight. I think it's plenty good and I won't be tearing anything else out at this point. If you would like to see a rare sight, have a look at the photos below.

            Original Bayliner foam that is still dry with dry wood on top and a solid stringer!



            Here is the section I cut out of the rear in it's "final shape" that I will patch (the dark spot in the foam on the left is from water that poured off the tarp when I removed it):



            Close up of the dry wood above the fuel tank at the back of the boat (note the gap between the bottom of the floor and the top of the fuel tank):



            Looking towards the bow. This is where I plan to simply resurface the wood with a belt sander or something to get through all the old flaking resin. Then I can just reapply new epoxy resin and cloth:

            ]

            More to come...

            ~T.J.

            Comment


              #7
              So, looking at the below picture (again), this is the plan. I am looking for advice on number one...

              1. A: Create a wooden support to run on top of the fuel tank between the stringers

              B: Sheet over the stringers like it was, but add expanding foam to fill the gap between the tank and floor. This might be the better option to prevent wear on the tank from vibrations?

              2. Lay in new resin sealed patch panel and screw in place

              3. Tie patch panel into the hull on either side, the "tab" I left at the rear, and both of the jump seat bases

              4. Glass entire floor with resin and cloth

              5. Additional layer of resin and mat

              6. Gel coat or bed liner

              7. Install carpet.

              How would you support the floor over the tank between these stringers?



              More to come later!

              ~T.J.

              EDIT: I forgot to mention that I am considering doing two larger square hatches in the center of the floor instead of one single long skinny ski locker. I don't ski or anything, and I think the square openings would be easier for storing extra gear and stuff.

              Comment


                #8
                While you are at it... In most boats the seats are to low for the captain. If they are (test sit and keep in mind that the bow will go up when running) you can increase the height of the base as you already dug into it. Gives a lot of extra storage space under the back-to-back seats........ I'm 6'1" and usually need two throwables under my butt to sit at the right height......

                Comment


                  #9
                  That's a great idea! Thanks! I'm much shorter than you, so I should definitely look into that. I was considering doing a captains seat (or whatever they're called) on that side anyway, but I wasn't sure. I was also thinking about doing a "Bayliner Cobra style seat" behind the captains seat, and keep the original lounge seats on the other side. Hmm... Ideas ideas

                  ~T.J.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    My Admiral is 5'6 and needs two additional PFD's to get the "head up"..... As soon as my carpet bites the dust and I go all Durabak the seat bases will get an additional 3-4" of height.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Ok, I knocked out a little more work tonight at the last minute. I went ahead and started sanding down the old broken resin in the bow area. I just wanted to get all the broken and loose stuff up and get the edges cleaned up for new stuff to stick better. Here's where I ended up:



                      I will have to take a day or two off from it since I will have my son, but then I will be back at it. I will pick up some plywood to start cutting into my patch panels, and hopefully order my glassing supplies. I'd really like to get this done soon!

                      ~T.J.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Ok, finally got some time to work on the boat. I took some scrap CDX I had lying around from a bathroom floor project and made templates out of it. I plan to get something different to make the actual patch panels from, but I wanted to get an idea of the fit and strength first. It was kind of a good thing I did this because I discovered that the foam that was under the original floor had actually bowed the floor up above the top edge of the stringers. This meant that the new floor section wouldn't lie in the boat flat. I took a hacksaw blade and simply shaved the foam until it was flush with the top of the stringers. This allowed the floor panel to sit perfectly flat across both stringers and on the hull. It's significantly stronger and more solid feeling now.





                        When the actual panels go in, I plan to resin all the pieces of wood, re-resin the stringers and hull, then set the new panels in and fill the gaps with a thick resin/chopped strand mixture. Then, I will lay cloth over the top of everything and carry it into the original hull everywhere to tie it all in as one solid structure.

                        Next step from here is to get final materials ordered (floor, fiberglass, resin, gel coat, etc) and build the replacement ski locker hatch. I think to save money and get it out sooner I will just put the original carpet back in for this season and see what happens. Who knows though, maybe I will do something else last minute.

                        ~T.J.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I got some more motivation to keep going on this. I got my fiberglass supplies today, and also cut out the ski locker hatch and made a replacement panel for that as well. Here are a couple pictures of that.





                          I need to make the support pieces that run along the long sides of the ski locker opening, but once that's done, I can start my actual wood work and fiberglass work. Oh, and I ordered a new water pump kit, a boat cover, a couple more speakers for the stereo, some new spark plugs, a new fuse box, a couple add-on items, etc. Last thing I think I need is some new carpet for the inside. Should be done soon if all goes well!

                          ~T.J.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            coming along nicely! Don't forget to raise the seat bases while you can or you may regret it later......

                            Test sit in the boat and imagine that the bow will be up 10" when under way and you will find the best height. If you are between 5'6" and 6'6" you will normally need around 4-6" higher seats to be comfortable. Best way to "test" is if you simulate the bow up with the trailer jack and lift the trailer tongue up. Somehow the boat designers seem to design the seat height for boats on the trailer or dealer lot and not for floating.

                            To many of us did hurt their behind sitting on the seat backs of the back-to-back seats! With just a tiny bit of chop you have a hard time sitting the following week.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              or replace it with a captains chair that you can adjust the height on. that's what I did.


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