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Trailering 2007 Bayliner 175, motor up or down?

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    Trailering 2007 Bayliner 175, motor up or down?

    Hi
    New member here with a new for me 2007 Bayliner 175 Alpha 1 stern drive 3.0, in really good shape. Am going to tow for storage and a quick question. Can boat be trailered with the trim in any position? (i understand up will limit hitting objects). How about when parked for the winter storage, should it be down for the year?

    thanks

    #2
    Up in trailer position while trailering to limit potential contact then as far down as possible during storage.
    The down position offers less stress on the bellows during long term storage.
    Welcome to the club.
    Dave
    Edmonds, WA
    "THE FIX"
    '93 2556
    Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

    The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
    Misc. projects thread
    https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

    Comment


      #3
      Yup... all the way up... and I do mean ALLL the way up. You'll drive it in down position once!

      I usually put a 2x4 under the out drive and then lowered the front end of the boat as low as I could while maintaining the proper down angle on the cover for rain... and then lowered the outdrive onto the 2x4 until it was almost touching it... then I would manually lift the trailer tongue up until the outdrive was on the 2x4... never had to replace the bellows in 11 years I had the boat.
      Ships n Giggles
      1993 Bayliner 4388
      MMSI# 367412710
      Day Island Yacht Club
      Commodore

      Comment


      • Skybird
        Skybird commented
        Editing a comment
        Seems like a trailering forum, so I will ask a question that is somewhat related. I took my 2017 VR5 with 115hp Merc to the river yesterday. When I pulled it out of the water it came right up on the bunks (no rollers) pretty easily. I cranked it all the way to the rubber bow roller so that it was right up against the bow. But after a 68 mile trip home, I noticed that the bow was now a few inches back from the rubber bow roller. I don't think it is a good idea to trailer with the boat not firmly against the roller. I tried to crank it on the trailer to pull it closer, but it did not budge. I don't know when I will be in the water again. I think there is a space there to squeeze in some sort of rubber bumper so the the roller and the bow are at least touching. Any suggestions? I don't think there is any way to lift the boat to allow me to crank it while on the trailer. This never happened before. The crank seems to be okay. Maybe the strap just stretched a bit?

      • Shipsngiggles
        Shipsngiggles commented
        Editing a comment
        Skybird did you secure the back of the boat with transom straps? If not, that is a must!

      • AlanSqB
        AlanSqB commented
        Editing a comment
        I have had a similar experience with the strap on the bow winch stretching a bit, but not quite that much. Second what Shipsngiggles said abut transom straps but for a 68 mile trip, especially on the highway, I'd probably add another ratchet strap over the midsection of the boat around where the wheels on the trailer are. I don't usually do this around town, but absolutely on longer trips for insurance. I also check the bow strap and snug it up during any quick stops during a trip.

        Did all this for a trip from WA to FL and despite a blown tire and broken bearing along the way, the boat never shifted.

      #4
      Regarding trailering: I am surprised there is so little stopping power for a boat to prevent it going forwards. Two transom straps that angle forwards and down, held with two eye bolts ( 4 thru-hull mounts), which prevents the boat from going backwards. Forward on the bow is 1 eyebolt (two mounting positions that are very close to each other) which holds a chain that goes into a slot in the winch post. If the chain rattles lose, there is nothing holding the bow. A bit of braking and the boat climbs the bow stop roller and comes off the trailer. Seeing so many videos and pictures of boats on the side of the road I wonder how often this happens.
      Anybody using additional bow tie-downs? Where do you attach them to?

      Comment


        #5
        The transom tie downs are to keep the boat secured to the trailer and to prevent it from bouncing while in transport. The videos and pictures you see of boats on the side of the road are often the result of LACK of proper securing the vessel to the trailer made worst if the trailer is equipped with rollers instead of carpeted bunks. On my OEM trailer the trailer winch holds the bow of the vessel securely against the bow winch/roller and in order for the bow to jump that it would need to come loose and the bow u-bolt would have to move back and jump over the roller. The additional safety chain in the front of mine is a coil metal cable. I trailer my vessel all the time at hwy speeds and never had any issues.

        I don't think additional tie-downs are needed when your trailer is properly setup for your vessel and is properly secured.

        Comment


          #6
          Agreed. I feel like the boats we see on the side of the road are from people who either didn't secure correctly to the trailer or ones who went down the road without periodically checking all the straps/chains/hooks. Make it a habit to check over all the trailer components every time you stop with at least a quick glance. I do a mental checklist and touch each one momentarily because I have OCD.

          I'm always shocked when I ride with other people who have no idea what's going on with their vehicles or trailers. They'll just cruise down the road and ignore or not see major issues. It's important to have an eye on your trailer while driving. Add it to your mirror scan. Pull over if anything doesn't look/feel/sound right.

          As for additional tie-downs, I do the center strap because it's belt and suspenders for the longer trips where I'll go hundreds of miles between stops. It's also something that's required in some countries and municipalities so it seemed like a good idea. Some boats actually have center attachment points for additional trailer straps.

          Finally, look into BoatBuckles BoatBuckle Boat Tie-Downs (immioutdoors.com). They're pretty interesting. I'm buying a set for my VR5. They bolt to the trailer so you don't have to run up to the truck to find them at the ramp.

          Comment


            #7
            I deal daily as a cargo pilot with large freight pallets or other objects that need to follow strict rules to secure them with straps, nets and chains, some up to 20Tons (44000 lbs).
            Having a good idea of how forces work I am just amazed that a 4000 lbs boat is held to a metal stanchion by 2 bolts going through some plastic (fiberglass). Heavy braking or a sudden impact (as in a collision) could rip the ubolt out of the bow and nothing will stop the boat. My transom straps go under and forward (by at least a foot) so any loss of restraint on the front can launch the boat about 3 ft forward. If they fall off, there is nothing to hold the boat.

            Here 2 pictures of my boat on the trailer:
            Attached Files

            Comment


              #8
              Originally posted by Metrodriver View Post
              Regarding trailering: I am surprised there is so little stopping power for a boat to prevent it going forwards. Two transom straps that angle forwards and down, held with two eye bolts ( 4 thru-hull mounts), which prevents the boat from going backwards. Forward on the bow is 1 eyebolt (two mounting positions that are very close to each other) which holds a chain that goes into a slot in the winch post. If the chain rattles lose, there is nothing holding the bow. A bit of braking and the boat climbs the bow stop roller and comes off the trailer. Seeing so many videos and pictures of boats on the side of the road I wonder how often this happens.
              Anybody using additional bow tie-downs? Where do you attach them to?
              Similar to this set up is a good idea. The further aft at the trailer connection point the better. Obviously the bow eye needs glassed in reinforcement to handle the potential stress that’ll present itself during a panic stop situation.
              Click image for larger version  Name:	8D04A3FD-1897-4573-AB34-5011706156B3.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	93.5 KB ID:	633997
              Heres a double strap set up.
              Click image for larger version

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              Dave
              Edmonds, WA
              "THE FIX"
              '93 2556
              Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

              The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
              Misc. projects thread
              https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

              Comment


                #9
                Yes, that is a good idea. I was thinking more like a strap from deck cleats down and rearwards to the trailer. Not necessarily under a lot of tension, but enough to help the bow eye bolt in case of an emergency stop before it would be pulled out of the hull..

                Comment

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