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    175 br smart tab sx users-gctid409496

    those out there who have the smart tabs sx on their 175 br I just have a couple quick questions. i already have the 40 lb tabs and the appropriate mounting kit needed for our unique hull design my 2 questions are

    has everyone been using the nylon bolts the tabs come with? I would think upgrading to a real bolt would be a little sturdier but if everyone is using the nylon bolts provided i'll just ride the bandwagon

    ps I dont run the boat in saltwater

    also, what setting has everyone been running their tabs at? I was just going to start with 3 like the directions say and adjust from there, but if everyone has found a better setting then i'm all ears

    thanks boys

    #2
    I have read where others have used stainless bolts. I went with the supplied nylon bolts, have had no issues in the season and a half since installation. From my experience, I conclude that a stainless steel bolt is harmless overkill.

    I installed my pivot bolts at the middle setting and have not moved them. There is a common mis-conception with Smart Tabs that changing the bolt location results in a change to the angle of the tab. Not so for installation on a "standard (flat) transom" In this case, changing the bolt location results in an incremental increase or decrease in the amount of hydrodynamic force required to move the tab up, but not a change in the initial position of the tab itself.

    All that is very well and good for a flat transom. For the 175 which has a bulb shaped protrusion on the upper part of the transom, the situation is a little different. The actuator strut upper mounting bracket is mounted on the bulb and hence is more over the top of the plane of the tab than it would be for a flat transom installation. So, moving the pivot bolt to a hole location closer to the transom will position the tab slightly slower. Conversely, moving it to a hole location away from the transom will position the tab slightly higher. And, since the actuator strut is closer to perpendicular to the tab, changing hole locations will have a smaller impact on the actuator force (increased or decreased) as compared to standard flat transomn install. Since the tabs were designed to be positioned at a specific angle to the transom plane (I forget what that angle is), I haven't messed with moving the pivot bolt from the middle hole. The boat/tabs perform great at this setting on a 175 in my opinion.

    Comment


      #3
      fish21121 wrote:
      I have read where others have used stainless bolts. I went with the supplied nylon bolts, have had no issues in the season and a half since installation. From my experience, I conclude that a stainless steel bolt is harmless overkill.

      I installed my pivot bolts at the middle setting and have not moved them. There is a common mis-conception with Smart Tabs that changing the bolt location results in a change to the angle of the tab. Not so for installation on a "standard (flat) transom" In this case, changing the bolt location results in an incremental increase or decrease in the amount of hydrodynamic force required to move the tab up, but not a change in the initial position of the tab itself.

      All that is very well and good for a flat transom. For the 175 which has a bulb shaped protrusion on the upper part of the transom, the situation is a little different. The actuator strut upper mounting bracket is mounted on the bulb and hence is more over the top of the plane of the tab than it would be for a flat transom installation. So, moving the pivot bolt to a hole location closer to the transom will position the tab slightly slower. Conversely, moving it to a hole location away from the transom will position the tab slightly higher. And, since the actuator strut is closer to perpendicular to the tab, changing hole locations will have a smaller impact on the actuator force (increased or decreased) as compared to standard flat transomn install. Since the tabs were designed to be positioned at a specific angle to the transom plane (I forget what that angle is), I haven't messed with moving the pivot bolt from the middle hole. The boat/tabs perform great at this setting on a 175 in my opinion.
      thank you very much sir, you have been extremely helpful

      Comment


        #4
        I thought about using stainless bolts but thought that the nylon bolts were probably better. Here is my rational thinking. If something goes wrong and there is excessive force applied to the smart tabs the nylon bolts will shear and hopefully not cause any harm to the transom where the smart tab brackets are attached.

        Comment


          #5
          nvrstsfd1 wrote:
          I thought about using stainless bolts but thought that the nylon bolts were probably better. Here is my rational thinking. If something goes wrong and there is excessive force applied to the smart tabs the nylon bolts will shear and hopefully not cause any harm to the transom where the smart tab brackets are attached.
          My thoughts exactly, whats cheaper to replace, 2 nylon bolts or the trim tabs themselves. I just wanted to verify my own rationale

          Comment


            #6
            My first thought about replacing the nylon with SS was why bother unless the nylon ones break. If they do break then maybe. If not then leave well enough alone. Now I'm thinking your on to something here. Always use nylon bolts and let them act as safety shears.

            nvrstsfd1 wrote:
            I thought about using stainless bolts but thought that the nylon bolts were probably better. Here is my rational thinking. If something goes wrong and there is excessive force applied to the smart tabs the nylon bolts will shear and hopefully not cause any harm to the transom where the smart tab brackets are attached.

            Comment


              #7
              We have been lucky and got some nice weather and I got my tabs all mounted up with the special clevis' on tab position 3. I'll take and post some pics if you guys like.

              Took her out this afternoon for a couple hours with a buddy, so my experiance with these tabs on my boat is limited and with a light load.

              All I can say so far though is, WOW! Very quick time to plane. Less throttle to get on plane (Approx 3/4 throttle before and closer to 1/2 throttle now). Slower minimum plane speed (Approx 2700-2800 RPM to consistently maintain plane before, 2400-2500 RPM now). Porpusing is virtually eliminated. Bow rise is significantly reduced. Slow speed bow wonder reduced. Top speed appears to be the same but I didn't GPS I'm just going by the speedo and where it reached before and after with similer load. Fuel consumption I can imagine will be slightly better as I don't need as much throttle for as long to get the boat to cuising or planing speed.

              I only noticed 2 negatives:

              1 - In a high speed hard turn the stern tends to "drift" out a little (I can't remember what this is called in a boat, but I mean oversteer or "drift" like a drift car), the boat occationally did this before and it's not at all to any degree that it feels unsafe. Whether it's less or more I couldn't tell ya.

              2 - Although the wake size appears the same, maybe slightly smaller, negligable if at all. It did have some white wash along the top edge that was very difficult to find a trim setting at wakeboard speed to clean up and make "crisp". More people, ballast, may yield different results.

              All that said, as mentioned it was a light load, just me and a buddy. I'd imagine my findings with a heavier load will be a bit different, overall though they certainly make a positive, and very noticable, difference when I compair to the many times I've gone out with similer load.

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