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    Not sure on what to do....-gctid406941

    Hey guys, newbie here. My wife and I have decided to buy a boat, ive been doing some research on boats and ive narrowed it down to 3 boats. Bayliner 170, Bayliner 175 are a Sea-Doo Challenger 180. Ive just about thrown out the Sea-Doo so that leaves me with the 170 are 175. First, let start by saying a little about what the boat is going to be used for. Im 28 years old, my wife is 26 and we have twin girls that were just born. Not real big into fishing so this is going to be used for joy riding and skiing. Now like already mentioned, im down to the 170 and the 175. Im not a real big fan of inboards so that would leave me with the 170. Ive looked at the options and I can get the 170 with the Flight package ( wake tower, graphics etc... ). More than likely get the Mercury 115 foursrtoke over the 90 also. The only thing I dont like about the 170 is I cant get the extended swim platform. Here's what I would like guys, I would like for you all to give me reasons why you would get the 170 are why you would get the 175.

    #2
    Make sure that you have actually driven in a 170/175 before you buy it. They are a really small boat and you'll have some challenges with weight distribution if you want to ski/board behind it. 4 people is going to be about the limit comfortably

    Between the 2 I'd get the 175 with the I/O but that is just a personal preference, don't care for outboards on runabouts. I find the 3.0L/IO easier to service and repair.

    Out of curiosity, what is the general price of the 170 vs 175?

    Comment


      #3
      oldjeep wrote:
      Make sure that you have actually driven in a 170/175 before you buy it. They are a really small boat and you'll have some challenges with weight distribution if you want to ski/board behind it. 4 people is going to be about the limit comfortably

      Between the 2 I'd get the 175 with the I/O but that is just a personal preference, don't care for outboards on runabouts. I find the 3.0L/IO easier to service and repair.

      Out of curiosity, what is the general price of the 170 vs 175?
      Its roughly $1,000.00 in price difference. Now im concerned about size, beacause I know when I my kids get bigger there each gonna want to bring a friend, so thats a total of 6 people in the boat. I understood that the price of inboards is going up beacuse of emissions. Also heard that the outboard gets better fuel economy. Can you shed some light on those topics?

      Comment


        #4
        bunkiefd4 wrote:
        Its roughly $1,000.00 in price difference. Now im concerned about size, beacause I know when I my kids get bigger there each gonna want to bring a friend, so thats a total of 6 people in the boat. I understood that the price of inboards is going up beacuse of emissions. Also heard that the outboard gets better fuel economy. Can you shed some light on those topics?
        No idea on the fuel economy, but gas is the cheap part when you are thinking about spending 20K+ on a boat. I'm amazed at how much the prices have gone up in the last 7 years. The 175 was a $9999 boat in 2005 when I bought my 195.

        One suggestion I have, especially since this is your first boat. You might want to consider a slightly used boat so that someone else can take the depreciation hit. You can buy used 2005-2008 175's around here for $7500 or so. That way you can see if boat ownership is really for you without breaking the bank - and gives you the opportunity to upsize later without taking it in the shorts on the sale of the smaller boat.

        Comment


          #5
          I have to weigh in on a couple things to hopefully spur some further discussion:

          1. I personally like outboards better, after having been a boater my whole life I have decided that outboards are simply cheaper and far less of a headache in the long run. With that said, they are louder, not as asthetically pleasing, etc...

          2. I have 2 young children myself, give SERIOUS consideration to a cuddy, you're wife and kids may much prefer it after looking. With that said, there is not a bayliner model in the lineup (nor has there been for some time) that is a cuddy with an outboard motor. I believe the 192 is a superb boat though. However there are walkaround style boats that are nice, and have outboard motors. The Striper 2101 being one of those. If you can find one, (Seaswirl no longer makes them) a Striper 1851 is a decent option. I know there is a dealer near Seattle that still has a new 2011 available.

          3. Maybe the 190 would be your sweet spot and put a camper canvas on it or something? There are so many options, and you will find what you want, but be choosy!

          Comment


            #6
            oldjeep wrote:
            No idea on the fuel economy, but gas is the cheap part when you are thinking about spending 20K+ on a boat. I'm amazed at how much the prices have gone up in the last 7 years. The 175 was a $9999 boat in 2005 when I bought my 195.

            One suggestion I have, especially since this is your first boat. You might want to consider a slightly used boat so that someone else can take the depreciation hit. You can buy used 2005-2008 175's around here for $7500 or so. That way you can see if boat ownership is really for you without breaking the bank - and gives you the opportunity to upsize later without taking it in the shorts on the sale of the smaller boat.
            Yea that could be a option. Ive found some pretty good deals on used boats. The only thing that concerns me is im scared im going to buy somebodys problem they want to get rid off. Second, I can get such a better rate when buying one new, the banks around here are rediculous on there intrest rates when buyng a boat. Im more confused than a goose in a hurricane on what I want to buy lol. Thanks for the input.

            Comment


              #7
              JasonS wrote:
              I have to weigh in on a couple things to hopefully spur some further discussion:

              1. I personally like outboards better, after having been a boater my whole life I have decided that outboards are simply cheaper and far less of a headache in the long run. With that said, they are louder, not as asthetically pleasing, etc...

              2. I have 2 young children myself, give SERIOUS consideration to a cuddy, you're wife and kids may much prefer it after looking. With that said, there is not a bayliner model in the lineup (nor has there been for some time) that is a cuddy with an outboard motor. I believe the 192 is a superb boat though. However there are walkaround style boats that are nice, and have outboard motors. The Striper 2101 being one of those. If you can find one, (Seaswirl no longer makes them) a Striper 1851 is a decent option. I know there is a dealer near Seattle that still has a new 2011 available.

              3. Maybe the 190 would be your sweet spot and put a camper canvas on it or something? There are so many options, and you will find what you want, but be choosy!
              Yea the 190 is a nice boat. Im affraid it mite be a little out of my price range though. Not to sure on the cuddy though. How are you liking the 160?

              Comment


                #8
                bunkiefd4 wrote:
                Yea that could be a option. Ive found some pretty good deals on used boats. The only thing that concerns me is im scared im going to buy somebodys problem they want to get rid off. Second, I can get such a better rate when buying one new, the banks around here are rediculous on there intrest rates when buyng a boat. Im more confused than a goose in a hurricane on what I want to buy lol. Thanks for the input.
                Meh, boats are money pits anyway. Get a good surveyer to survey any potential purchases and enjoy your savings! New and used, they all need $$$ and upkeep.

                Comment


                  #9
                  bunkiefd4 wrote:
                  Yea that could be a option. Ive found some pretty good deals on used boats. The only thing that concerns me is im scared im going to buy somebodys problem they want to get rid off. Second, I can get such a better rate when buying one new, the banks around here are rediculous on there intrest rates when buyng a boat. Im more confused than a goose in a hurricane on what I want to buy lol. Thanks for the input.
                  You'll find that a lot of the 170/175 starter boats will have little to no use on them and have lived in a garage. Lots of folks buy them, use them a bunch the first year and then park them - while continuing to make payments until what they owe on the boat is finally less than the boat is worth resale. Don't let yourself get talked into those 15 year loans that a lot of boat dealers like quoting monthly payments on.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    bunkiefd4 wrote:
                    Yea the 190 is a nice boat. Im affraid it mite be a little out of my price range though. Not to sure on the cuddy though. How are you liking the 160?
                    Love my 160, even with 2 young kids we take it out every few weeks. However we usually have to find a permanent home on the shore for all the people and crap, and use the boat for watersports and such. But, all the same, my wife enjoys lounging (beach or the boat, whichever) and i like watching people eat it on the kneeboard and tube, and my daughter is happy as long as she's outside. It's a fine day at the lake as long as your boat floats and runs! With that said, I will get a larger boat later in life

                    Comment


                      #11
                      With family onboard, I'd add these items for consideration:

                      cuddy (somewhere for the kids to get out of the weather)

                      an onboard head/porta-potti

                      I/O vice an outboard (quieter)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        My .02.

                        The 175 can be roomier with buckets rather than back to back seating. If you are planning to have more than 4 on the boat it would require some to sit/ride up front. Some folks don't like to be underway with passengers up front. That is where my wife and daughter prefer to ride. Just not WOT. I have had 5 adults in the boat at once and it was kinda tight. Not unuseable, just tight.

                        Now... Outboard over inboard. I prefer the inboard for this type of boat. Couple of reasons.

                        1. The outboard can take some of your space due to the engine mount on the back. Since inboards are built around/over the engine, they can be a bit roomier.

                        2. You mentioned it... Swim Platform. When skiing, towing toys, wakeboarding, lounging, and swimming, all the action takes place at the back of the boat. The extra space a platform provides makes those activities much more enjoyable. We added an aftermarket platform to ours, and were truly amazed at how much more fun our outings were.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Try to find a dealer that will let you demo some of these boats. I did and found both the 4 stroke and Optimax engines to be smoother and quieter with better performance then then the 3.0 I/O.

                          I had 3 adults, 2 teens, and a child on my 180 Monday and while that was about as far as I would push the passenger load the performance was fantastic including while towing two on a big tube.

                          Add the 180 to your list to look at. I think outboards are a better choice but you will find plenty of opinions on both sides. For one thing the outboard extends my season in Minnesota, the land of ice and snow.

                          Measure your garage while you are looking. Storing indoors is the way to make a boat last forever.

                          Aaron

                          180 w/Opti 125

                          Comment


                            #14
                            awhite4 wrote:
                            For one thing the outboard extends my season in Minnesota, the land of ice and snow.
                            How do you figure?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              oldjeep wrote:
                              How do you figure?
                              because they drain themselves. Minimal winterization. I/O.....well, if ya have one, ya know.

                              My http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.p....gif[/img]

                              I'd seriously consider the outboard. That will be my next choice. I/O maintenance is a PITA. Just don't buy too small. two-foot-itis (wanting something bigger) can set in quickly.

                              If you live close to the water, open bow is great. Bad weather, potty breaks, etc. are much easier. If not, cuddies are a great option. That said, new cuddies with an outboard are kinda rare. Consider used if this is a deal breaker.

                              Wellcraft has a nice walk around....but not cheap.

                              Welcome aboard and fill in your location (user profile) so we can give you some more info.

                              Comment

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